Can Dogs Eat Tomatoes? What Matters is the Color

Can Dogs Eat Tomatoes

The answer to “Can Dogs Eat Tomatoes?” may seem to be yes because your dog might discover your tomato plants in your garden one day and eat them all up…  however the side effects of this tomato feast could result in gastrointestinal upsets for your dog like diarrhea and vomiting which you’ll have to clean up for a week, not to mention the loss of all your tomatoes in your garden.

This dog health article gives you the answer to what color tomato your dog can eat.  I hope when you read this article it will give you the information you need about healthy tomatoes for your dog.

Can Dogs Eat Tomatoes?  Dangers of Green Tomatoes, Stems & Leaves

Tomatoes are part of the nightshade family of fruits and vegetables.  can dogs eat tomatoesThe stem and leaves of the tomato contain solanine which is harmful to your dog in large quantities.

Immature or green tomatoes contain higher amounts of solanine than red ripe tomatoes.

Here are 4 signs of tomatine poisoning from green tomatoes, stems and leaves:

  1. Gastrointestinal upset – Your dog may vomit and have diarrhea from eating too many tomatoes or if he eats green tomatoes, stems and leaves.
  2. Cardiac effects – Your dog could have an increased heart rate from tomatine poisoning.  
  3. If you think your dog may be prone to heart problems, the answer is no to “can dogs eat tomatoes?” for you.
  4. Loss of coordination – Your dog could experience weakness in his legs and body if he eats a large quantity of green tomatoes.  You may notice your dog becomes lethargic or has tremors and seizures.
  5. Dilated pupil – Your dog’s eye’s could become dilated as a side effect of tomatine poisoning.

Note:  Bring your dog to your vet immediately if you see any of the above signs of tomatine poisoning.

Health Benefits of Red Ripe Tomatoes for Dogs

Can dogs eat tomatoesRipe tomatoes are nontoxic for your dog to eat in moderation, however your dog should not eat green tomatoes and tomato plants.  To be safe, fence off your garden to prevent your dog from tomatine poisoning if you grow tomatoes.  Now you have the answer to “can dogs eat tomatoes?

Here are 4 benefits of red ripe tomatoes for your dog:

  1. Anti-cancer – The lycopene in tomatoes can defend your dog against cancer and degenerative diseases.  Give your dog 2 or 3 cherry tomatoes as a treat every week.
  2. Vitamins – Ripe tomatoes are a great source of vitamins like vitamin C which can protect your dog from upper respiratory infections, ear and skin infections.
  3. Antioxidants – Tomatoes are loaded with antioxidants that can stop cellular damage caused by free radicals. You can feed your dog 2 or 3 slices of tomato every week.
  4. Beta-carotene – The benefits of beta-carotene for your dog start with eye health, skin and fur health, and boosts your dog’s immune system.  Can dogs eat tomatoes?  The answer is yes and you can give your dog a few of the tomato slices you trim off your ripe tomatoes with his meal 3 times a week.

Avoid These Foods With Tomatoes that are Harmful to Your Dog

can dogs eat tomatoesYou may already know that human foods with tomato sauce or other tomato combinations may be toxic for your dog. 

Here’s 4 popular table foods that can be harmful to your dog:

  1. Pizza – Even though your dog may want to munch on your slice of pizza, the bread and spices alone could upset his stomach and cause indigestion that leads to vomiting and diarrhea.
  2. Salsa – Your chips and salsa could be a quick treat, but there’s onions and spices that are not good for your dog’s digestive tract.
  3. Guacamole – There could be healthy pieces of tomato in your guacamole, but avocado is hard for your dog to digest and could lead to diarrhea.
  4. Lasagna – Carbs, oil and spices used in your favorite recipe for lasagna can give your dog an upset stomach and add too many calories to his diet.

can dogs eat tomatoesNow you know the answer to “Can dogs eat tomatoes?  You can happily give your dog a few cherry tomatoes or slices of fresh ripe tomatoes every week and feel safe.  Remember to keep your dog out of your tomato garden and away from green tomatoes, stems and leaves.

Share this health article about tomatoes for dogs with your friends and family so they know the right color tomato to give their dog and add vitamins, antioxidants and beta-carotene to their dog’s diet.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

Hope you took some great value out of this post on the benefits of ripe red tomatoes for your dog today! I’d love to hear your feedback, so make sure you leave a comment with your thoughts or questions.  Also, you can click on the social media links below to share this article.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like breaking news on how to NOT overpay for your dog’s healthcare costs and reduce the number of times your dog gets sick, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

Meningitis in Dogs: Keys to Unravel Causes & Symptoms

Meningitis in DogsMeningitis in dogs often has unknown causes that affect your dog’s central nervous system, which may result in chronic pain and severe seizures for your dog as well as bills for thousands of dollars to get MRI’s, ultrasounds and dozens of laboratory tests just to discover the treatments for meningitis to try to determine what’s wrong with your dog, which may not shed light on the cure … and even worse, you may never know how your dog got this life-threatening disease.

This news alert gives you 6 keys to unravel causes and symptoms of meningitis or inflammation in your dog’s brain and spinal cord.  Puppies and older dogs with lowered immune systems are at greatest risk for catching meningitis.

6 Possible Causes of Meningitis in Dogs

Meningitis often develops as a secondary infection that may start in your dog’s ears or nose.  Frequently, this disease results from a virus or irregular immune system response and can be idiopathic which means the cause is unknown. 

Possible causes of your dog’s meningitis:

  1. Bacterial infections – Your dog may have an infection of his ears, eyes or nose.  These infections can reach your dog’s brain and spinal cord through his blood. 
  2. Parasites – Infections like distemper, parvo and rabies can spread to your dog’s central nervous system and cause inflammation that leads to neurological damage.
  3. Lyme disease  Another possible cause of meningitis in dogs may be lyme disease which could lead to inflammation of membranes surrounding your dog’s brain and spinal cord.
  4. Toxins – Drugs and vaccines can also lead to inflammation of your dog’s nervous system. 
  5. Steroids – Steroid responsive meningitis occurs when the walls of your dog’s arteries become inflamed.
  6. Breeds – Some dog breeds like Pugs, Beagles and Bernese Mountain Dogs are susceptible to meningitis.

Symptoms of Your Dog’s Meningitis       

Your dog may have already shown the symptoms below:

  • Muscle spasms, seizures and weakness in his legs, neck and back
  • Head tilting, unsteady walking and sensitivity to your touch
  • Lethargy, weakness and depression
  • Fever, vomiting and low blood pressure

Advanced cases of meningitis in dogs can result in:

  • Uncontrolled movements and loss of muscle coordination or ataxia
  • Blindness and paralysis
  • Confusion, depression and aggression

Caring for Your Dog with Meningitis    

Since meningitis is a progressive disease in dogs, the best care you can give your dog is to reduce his inflammation and keep him hydrated.  Ask your veterinarian for all the options you can choose to make your dog as comfortable as possible.

Unfortunately, there are no clear-cut answers to how your dog gets meningitis.  This article gives you 6 keys to help you unravel the possible causes of meningitis in dogs so you can have some tips which I hope will guide you to new ways to comfort your dog.  If your dog hasn’t yet come down with meningitis, then I hope these 6 keys to help you unravel the causes of meningitis will help you prevent your dog from catching this life-threatening disease.

Share this news brief with your friends and family so they know that early detection and treatment of meningitis in dogs is crucial to prevent your dog from life-threatening neurological damage.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like easy to follow news briefs to Get a Handle On Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs, claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

Dog Seizures: Real Stories to Clarify Your Challenge

Dog Seizures

Dog seizures may start suddenly in the still of the night when you hear your dog cry and find him sprawled on the floor in a pool of his own vomit.  These short epileptic seizures can last less than a minute, however you and your dog could end up exhausted at an emergency animal clinic after several visits to more than one vet for tests and evaluations. You may be so frustrated that you wonder if there’s a light at the end of the tunnel or whether you’ll eventually lose your dog from these violent seizures.

This news story gives you 2 insightful seizure submissions sent to Dog Health News from dog owners who shared their struggle with their dogs‘ seizures. My hope is you’ll be able to glean information from their stories to help you cope with your dog’s seizures.  I understand your pain when you see your dog experience his seizure and how difficult it may be for you to find a satisfactory solution.

Dog Seizures Submissions to Dog Health News

You may already know that all dog breeds can suffer from seizures at an early age. Statistics show idiopathic seizures could occur in 6% of dogs.

This means you need to know what you should do for your dog so you don’t panic or cause harm to your dog during his seizure if he shows symptoms like: convulsions, excessive panting and vomiting.

The dog parent seizure submissions below illustrate why it’s so important for you to now notice changes in your dog’s behavior, muscle strength and energy level.  Your dog may need to have blood work and x-rays, take prescription drugs and require continual care which could lead to high dog health expenses. 

Dog SeizuresDog health insurance may help you cover some of your medical expenses.

Now, Phenobarbital and Zonisamide are epileptic drugs used as anticonvulsants.  However, your dog may experience side effects from these drugs like: ataxia, anxiety, weight gain and loss of muscle control. 

Check with your veterinarian for all the details related to your dog’s specific condition before you give your dog these drugs.

Kimberly’s Dog Seizures Submission

“My 3 year old Chihuahua suddenly developed weakness, stiffening of the neck and back and yelping as if in pain. I would hold him until he was comfortable, and he would stop crying. This left him extremely tired. 

We took him to the vet and was told he is having epileptic seizures. The blood work showed nothing .

It did appear that it was some sort of episode.  After being on Phenobarbital for 3 long weeks he is still doing all the same things. 

Finally we took him to an emergency clinic, and they did full x-rays, and showed us a tiny separation in his neck vertebrae. He is now on muscle relaxers and pain meds. 

He seems to be much better until during the night he had another episode.”

Kristina’s Dog Seizures Submission

“I have an 11 month old Siberian Husky that has short seizures very frequently.

The seizures began 3 days after he was neutered when he was 7 months old. 

He vomits and then immediately has a 30-40 second seizure. The first vet prescribed Phenobarbital twice per day after a standard blood, urine, and fecal analysis.  Diagnosis: Epilepsy. 

The longest he would go without a seizure was 2 weeks. 

The second vet tested his blood extensively and tested for a liver shunt.  All is normal except that his red blood cells are smaller than normal.  Diagnosis: Epilepsy. 

They prescribed Zonisamide. He went 2 1/2 weeks without a seizure on both medicines. 

Now we are trying to ween him off of the Phenobarbital and he has seizures every week and a half. The second vet suggests we play it by ear at this point. 

He may have to take both medicines, but we don’t want him to die of liver failure at a young age because of it.

The only other option is an MRI and spinal tap which costs well beyond what we can afford right now.

My question is even if we have an MRI and find out he has some other neurological problem, is there really any other medications that will change his status?

I know there are other anti-seizure medications, but is there really going to be a light at the end of this?

Did the anesthesia from his neutering cause this?  Every time he vomits, even if he just ate some grass because his belly didn’t feel good, he has a seizure. 

At first we thought seizures were his trauma reaction from eating things he shouldn’t have like plastic or pieces of a toy.  He’s so young and I don’t want to lose him to a grand mal.”

4 Dog Seizures Management Tips

  1. Prevention – Eliminate salty treats or food that contain potassium bromide which may lead to your dog’s seizures.
  2. Medication – Be careful about administering medication to control your dog’s epileptic seizures.  Any disruption in dosage may aggravate or initiate seizures.
  3. Diet – Medications for seizure control can cause weight gain so you may want to ask your veterinarian to help you with a diet plan for your dog.
  4. Herbal Remedy – You can use Turmeric, a powerful pain reliever and anti-inflammatory herb to help with your dog’s Dog Seizuresepilepsy.  Daily dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your dog’s weight and not exceed 2 teaspoons for dogs over 100 pounds.

This news story gave you first-hand accounts surrounding dog seizures so you’re aware of the symptoms related to epileptic seizures and specific questions you can ask your veterinarian. 

I want you to know that dog seizures are almost never fatal.  Your goal should be to reduce the frequency of your dog’s epileptic episodes so you minimize your dog’s suffering and manage his condition.

You can also submit your dog seizure experience and your solutions in the comment section below.

Share this article with other people you know who face challenges with their dog’s epileptic seizures.

I hope you received value from this article today.  I’d love to hear your feedback.  Leave your comments with your thoughts or questions.  Also, you can click on the social media links below to share this article… Thank you!

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