Deaf Dog: 10 Secret Tips To Keep Your Dog Safe

Deaf DogYour deaf dog may require extra supervision to ensure her safety especially when she’s near street traffic and can’t hear a loud horn from a driver who tries to warn your dog to quickly move out of his way, or you need to use hand signals to direct your dog to come for meals… and even worse your dog with loss of hearing may wander outdoors if you’re not careful which could result in fatal injuries if your dog gets hit by a car.

This dog health article gives you 8 secret tips to protect your dog with a hearing loss from harm.  Dogs of all ages need your extra care to keep their ears safe from infections and injuries that can affect their hearing.

8 Secret Tips to Care for Your Deaf Dog

  1. Hearing Range Test – Your dog with a hearing loss may still have a range of hearing.  You can test your dog’s hearing with Deaf Dogranges of sound from high to low.  Blow a high pitched whistle, clap your hands and hit a small drum to see if your dog reacts.  You can use these tools to get your dog’s attention if she can hear any of these ranges.  This means you could whistle, clap or use a drum to get your dog to come to you even if her hearing is almost gone.
  2. Hand Signals  You’ll have to work with your deaf dog to practice good eye contact and use clear signals to teach her commands like when to sit, come or stop barking. Positive reinforcement with signals instead of treats is the best strategy so your dog doesn’t expect a treat each time she does something correctly.
  3. Vibration – A simple way to wake your dog without startling her is to bump into your bed or tap the floor with your shoe.   The vibration from these actions will be a much gentler way to get your dog’s attention.  Avoid nudging or kicking your hearing impaired dog for any reason because it will make her anxious and nervous around people.
  4. Leash – Always keep your deaf dog on a leash when you are out for a walk to keep her safe.  You can take off your dog’s leash if you have a fenced in backyard.  Make sure someone watches your hearing impaired dog whenever she’s outdoors to protect her from accidents or injuries.
  5. Lights – You can use a flashlight to give your dog with hearing loss cues to come for meals or go for walks.  Try switching your porch light on and off a few times to get your dog to come to your door if you have an enclosed backyard.
  6. Treats – Give your deaf dog treats after you brush her teeth, cut her nails or if she learns a new command.  Your deaf dog may respond quicker to training and hand signals when you reward her with treats.
  7. Special skills – Your hearing impaired dog may be a perfect candidate as a therapy dog or she may enjoy agility training.  Deaf dogs are easy to train and aren’t as distracted by noise which makes them more focused on the task at hand.
  8. Patience – Your dog with a hearing loss may need more patience and care because of her disability.  Focus on how to use Deaf Dogyour dog’s sense of smell and touch to keep her happy.  For example you could use a peanut butter stuffed Kong to teach your dog to follow you in your house.  Your deaf dog will also appreciate your hugs and kisses every day because her need for love and attention through touch may be greater.

Note:  Deaf dogs can live a full and active life because they adjust to their hearing challenge better than humans.

Our featured dog is Eddie, a lovable Pomeranian who is deaf and lives in New England with his owners who have adapted very well to his hearing loss.

You’ve just read about the 8 secret tips you can use to help you keep your hearing impaired dog safe.  The most important point may be that your dog can enjoy a long and happy life even when she loses her hearing.

Share this dog health article about secret tips to help deaf dogs with your family and friends so they have information to care for their deaf dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Can Dogs Eat Tomatoes? What Matters is the Color

Can Dogs Eat Tomatoes

The answer to “Can Dogs Eat Tomatoes?” may seem to be yes because your dog might discover your tomato plants in your garden one day and eat them all up…  however the side effects of this tomato feast could result in gastrointestinal upsets for your dog like diarrhea and vomiting which you’ll have to clean up for a week, not to mention the loss of all your tomatoes in your garden.

This dog health article gives you the answer to what color tomato your dog can eat.  I hope when you read this article it will give you the information you need about healthy tomatoes for your dog.

Can Dogs Eat Tomatoes?  Dangers of Green Tomatoes, Stems & Leaves

Tomatoes are part of the nightshade family of fruits and vegetables.  can dogs eat tomatoesThe stem and leaves of the tomato contain solanine which is harmful to your dog in large quantities.

Immature or green tomatoes contain higher amounts of solanine than red ripe tomatoes.

Here are 4 signs of tomatine poisoning from green tomatoes, stems and leaves:

  1. Gastrointestinal upset – Your dog may vomit and have diarrhea from eating too many tomatoes or if he eats green tomatoes, stems and leaves.
  2. Cardiac effects – Your dog could have an increased heart rate from tomatine poisoning.  
  3. If you think your dog may be prone to heart problems, the answer is no to “can dogs eat tomatoes?” for you.
  4. Loss of coordination – Your dog could experience weakness in his legs and body if he eats a large quantity of green tomatoes.  You may notice your dog becomes lethargic or has tremors and seizures.
  5. Dilated pupil – Your dog’s eye’s could become dilated as a side effect of tomatine poisoning.

Note:  Bring your dog to your vet immediately if you see any of the above signs of tomatine poisoning.

Health Benefits of Red Ripe Tomatoes for Dogs

Can dogs eat tomatoesRipe tomatoes are nontoxic for your dog to eat in moderation, however your dog should not eat green tomatoes and tomato plants.  To be safe, fence off your garden to prevent your dog from tomatine poisoning if you grow tomatoes.  Now you have the answer to “can dogs eat tomatoes?

Here are 4 benefits of red ripe tomatoes for your dog:

  1. Anti-cancer – The lycopene in tomatoes can defend your dog against cancer and degenerative diseases.  Give your dog 2 or 3 cherry tomatoes as a treat every week.
  2. Vitamins – Ripe tomatoes are a great source of vitamins like vitamin C which can protect your dog from upper respiratory infections, ear and skin infections.
  3. Antioxidants – Tomatoes are loaded with antioxidants that can stop cellular damage caused by free radicals. You can feed your dog 2 or 3 slices of tomato every week.
  4. Beta-carotene – The benefits of beta-carotene for your dog start with eye health, skin and fur health, and boosts your dog’s immune system.  Can dogs eat tomatoes?  The answer is yes and you can give your dog a few of the tomato slices you trim off your ripe tomatoes with his meal 3 times a week.

Avoid These Foods With Tomatoes that are Harmful to Your Dog

can dogs eat tomatoesYou may already know that human foods with tomato sauce or other tomato combinations may be toxic for your dog. 

Here’s 4 popular table foods that can be harmful to your dog:

  1. Pizza – Even though your dog may want to munch on your slice of pizza, the bread and spices alone could upset his stomach and cause indigestion that leads to vomiting and diarrhea.
  2. Salsa – Your chips and salsa could be a quick treat, but there’s onions and spices that are not good for your dog’s digestive tract.
  3. Guacamole – There could be healthy pieces of tomato in your guacamole, but avocado is hard for your dog to digest and could lead to diarrhea.
  4. Lasagna – Carbs, oil and spices used in your favorite recipe for lasagna can give your dog an upset stomach and add too many calories to his diet.

can dogs eat tomatoesNow you know the answer to “Can dogs eat tomatoes?  You can happily give your dog a few cherry tomatoes or slices of fresh ripe tomatoes every week and feel safe.  Remember to keep your dog out of your tomato garden and away from green tomatoes, stems and leaves.

Share this health article about tomatoes for dogs with your friends and family so they know the right color tomato to give their dog and add vitamins, antioxidants and beta-carotene to their dog’s diet.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

Hope you took some great value out of this post on the benefits of ripe red tomatoes for your dog today! I’d love to hear your feedback, so make sure you leave a comment with your thoughts or questions.  Also, you can click on the social media links below to share this article.

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7 Dog UTI Symptoms You Need to Know

dog UTI symptomsDog UTI symptoms could easily go unnoticed because you may not pay enough attention to the number of times your dog urinates or even see if she dribbles her urine and you might not detect pink spots on your carpet…  and then you finally have a clue something’s wrong when you hear your dog whimper and cry out in pain when she can’t empty her bladder.

This dog health article gives you causes, symptoms, treatments and herbal remedies to help you detect and manage your dog’s urinary tract infection (UTI). Urinary tract stones and UTI conditions are common in dogs and can be painful.

7 Dog UTI Symptoms You Need to Watch Out For

You may think your dog’s habits changed suddenly when she wakes you up and needs to urinate every hour in the middle of the night however she may have early signs of a bladder infection. 

Here’s 7 UTI symptoms you can watch out for to help your dog:

  1. Breaking house-training – Your dog may have a bladder infection if she’s breaking her house-training and has accidents in your home.
  2. Frequent urination – Keep your eyes on your dog’s flow of urine to make sure she’s urinating freely and easily.
  3. Blood in the urine – Pink spots or stains on your carpet are one of the hardest dog UTI symptoms to find.  These pink spots give you a clue that your dog has blood in her urine.
  4. Dribbling urine – Your dog may have a constant drip of urine after she’s relieved herself.  A bladder infection can make it hard for your dog to completely empty her bladder which results in dribbling.
  5. Crying out – Urinary tract stones and UTI conditions can be painful and your dog may whine or cry when she urinates.
  6. Straining – Your dog may have pain when she tries to urinate which results in strain to empty her bladder.
  7. Obsessive licking – Your dog may lick her anus to try to get relief from pain or to continuously clear the dribbles of urine.

Note: Bring your dog to your vet for a urine analysis if you notice any Dog UTI Symptomsof these 7 dog UTI symptoms.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Your Dog’s Urinary Tract Infections

  • Your vet will get a culture from your dog’s urine to look for white blood cells which may mean your dog has a bacterial infection or bladder stones.
  • This culture can also tell your vet if your dog may have more serious problems like a kidney infection or prostate which affects your dog’s urinary tract.
  • Your vet will be able to determine the right antibiotic to prescribe for your dog based on the bacteria needed to target.   
  • Immediate detection of dog UTI symptoms and treatment of your dog’s urinary tract infection is critical to prevent your dog from kidney stones that could obstruct her urethra.  Kidney stones can prevent your dog from urinating which could quickly lead to your dog’s kidney failure, ruptured bladder and can be fatal.

Note:  The best treatment for your dog’s bladder infections always includes lots of bowls of fresh clean water.  You can never give your dog too much water.

4  Safe Herbal Remedies to Help Your Dog with Urinary Tract Infections

Choose from these 4 safe herbal remedies to help with dog UTI symptoms:

  1. Echinacea   Echinacea helps your dog fight bacterial infections and viruses. Add 1/2 cup cooled down, soothing echinacea tea to your dog’s water dish daily to help eliminate her urinary tract infections.
  2. Lemon – Lemon juice acts as a powerful antioxidant which Dog UTI Symptomsfights bacterial and urinary tract infections. Use 1/4 teaspoon or less daily for small dogs under 10 pounds.  Use 1-2 teaspoons daily for medium to large dogs.  Add 1/2 teaspoon grated, chopped or finely minced lemon to your dog’s food at morning or night.  Keep lemon parts refrigerated in an air tight glass receptacle to keep fresh.
  3. Parsley – Parsley is a powerful diuretic that helps with dog UTI symptoms.  Chop fresh parsley and add 1/4 teaspoon to your dog’s food.  Be sure to give your dog plenty of fresh clean water to help flush out any bacterial infections.
  4. Plantain – You can feed plantain to your dog for urinary tract infections. Put plantain leaves in your blender or juicer and give your dog 1 teaspoon daily for every 20 pounds.

You’ve just read about the 7 UTI symptoms you need to watch for to take better care of your dog’s health.  I’ve also given you causes, treatments and herbal remedies that will help you prevent or heal your dog’s bladder infection before they become more serious.

Share this dog health article with your friends and family so they’ll know about dog UTI symptoms and ways to help their dog’s bacterial infections, kidney stones or prostate.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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My Dog Has Fleas: 13 Safe Herbal Remedies to Repel Them

Dog Has FleasIf your dog has fleas you may end up with a stack of bills for products to kill her fleas like sprays and flea collars plus you’ll need to spend even more money to treat your home for fleas to exterminate flea larvae that are hidden in your carpet, furniture, curtains or clothes and worse than that you could get frustrated when your dog carries home more fleas which forces you to repeat the flea removal process with little or no hope you’ll ever get rid of your dog’s fleas. 

This health article gives you 13 safe herbal remedies that will help you keep fleas away from your dog.  This article doesn’t address your indoor and outdoor flea challenges, but I want you to be aware that you may need to address these problems as well.

13 Safe Herbal Remedies to Use When Your Dog Has Fleas

Choose 1 or more of these 13 safe herbal remedies listed below to help keep fleas away from your dog.  Check with your vet to make sure your dog is not allergic to any of these essential oils.

The other supplies you may need include spray bottles, coconut oil, undiluted fresh lemon juice, dog shampoo, cotton string and a coffee grinder.

  1. Apple cider vinegar (ACV) – You can use organic ACV on your dog to repel ticks and fleas.  Mix a 50/50 solution of ACV in water and use a spray bottle to apply it to your dog’s fur.  ACV can sting, so don’t spray it on your dog’s open wounds or near her eyes.
  2. Castor oil – When your dog has fleas you can rub non-toxic castor oil on your dog’s skin around her neck and body to help repel pests like fleas because it cuts off the flea’s source of oxygen.
  3. Cedar wood – You can mix 1 drop cedar wood essential oil with 1 drop lemongrass oil and 1 cup organic ACV in a spray bottle. Apply to your dog’s fur to help repel her fleas.  For a more powerful blend, combine 1 drop cedar wood, orange, rosemary and lavender oils with 1 cup organic ACV and spray on your dog.
  4. Citronella oil – To help repel your dog’s fleas, mix 1 drop of citronella oil in 1 cup coconut oil and 1 cup ACV in a spray bottle.  You can also add 1 drop of your choice of cedar wood, Dog Has Fleaseucalyptus, lavender, lemongrass, rosemary, sage, or thyme essential oils.  Whether your dog has fleas or not you can spray her with any of these essential oil mixtures before you take her outdoors for walks and play. 
  5. Eucalyptus oil – Mix 1 drop eucalyptus essential oil with 1 drop citronella, lemongrass and sage oil diluted in 1/4 cup coconut oil.  Dip a cotton string in this mixture and tie it loosely around your dog’s neck like a collar to help ward off fleas.
  6. Lavender oil – Spray a light lavender mist on your dog’s body before you go on walks to help keep fleas away.  Mix 1-2 drops of lavender essential oil with a cup of coconut oil in a spray bottle.  You can add lavender oil to any of your flea repellant sprays for an extra level of protection for your dog.
  7. Lemon oil – A drop or 2 of lemon oil in your dog’s shampoo can help if your dog has fleas.  You can also mix 1/8 teaspoon fresh lemon juice with 3 tablespoons distilled water and add to your dog’s shampoo.  Always keep undiluted lemon juice and lemon oil away from your dog’s eyes and open wounds because it will sting.
  8. Lemongrass oil – In a spray bottle, combine 4 drops lemongrass oil with 1 cup coconut oil and 1 drop cedar wood, citronella and eucalyptus essential oils to help repel fleas and mosquitoes.  You can spray your dog, carpets, upholstery, curtains and bedding with this light fragrant mixture.
  9. Orange oil – Sweet smelling orange oil is good to ward off fleas. You can mix 1/4 teaspoon orange oil with your dog’s shampoo to help kill fleas.
  10. Peppermint oil – The strong smell of peppermint oil is also a great herb to use as an insect and flea repellant if your dog has fleas. Mix 1 drop peppermint oil with 1 cup coconut oil and spray on your dog’s fur.
  11. Rosemary oil – Add 4 drops rosemary oil to a cup of coconut oil and pour into a spray bottle.  You can mist your dog, carpet, furniture and curtains to help keep fleas away.  Grind rosemary powder with herbs like peppermint and sage in a coffee grinder and massage into your dog’s skin around her neck and scalp for additional flea protection.
  12. Sage oil – Use sage oil in a light spray to help keep fleas away from your dog.  Combine 1 drop of your favorite essential oil with sage oil and mix with 1 cup coconut oil to spray on your dog’s fur.
  13. Thyme oil – Thyme essential oil is yet another perennial herb you can use if your dog has fleas.  Mix 1 drop of thyme essential oil with equal amounts of peppermint, sage and lavender oil in 1 cup coconut oil.  Use a spray bottle to apply to your dog’s fur.

Dog Has FleasNow you have 13 safe herbal remedies you can choose from to help you keep fleas away from your dog. 

You may already know it’s important to feed your dog a healthy breed specific diet of protein and vegetables. What you may not know is that fleas seek out dogs that are weak and unhealthy.

Share this article with your friends and family in case their dog has fleas so they have ways to safely keep fleas away from their dog.  You can always depend on Dog Health News for the best dog health strategies.

Hope you took some great value out of this post on how to repel your dog’s fleas with safe herbal remedies today! I’d love to hear your feedback, so make sure you leave a comment with your thoughts or questions. Also, you can click on the social media links below to share this article.

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Dog Scooting: 3 Messy Reasons Your Dog Drags His Bottom

Dog ScootingDog scooting may destroy your carpet and embarrass you when your dog drags his bottom on your carpet in front of your friends and the longer you wait to look at your dog’s messy private parts to see what’s wrong the worse his condition could get which might lead to months of vet visits, expensive treatments or surgery to repair your dog’s anal sacs or stitch up his rectal prolapse.

This health article gives you causes of infections and inflammation which could lead to your dog’s habit of dragging his bottom to relieve his pain.  I hope when you read this article it will give you information to help you with your dog’s condition.

5 Causes that Lead to Dog Scooting

  1. Anal sac problems – Your dog may have smelly fatty substances that drip out of his anal sacs inside your dog’s anus.  These sacs can become abscessed, blocked and inflamed which can cause your dog pain.  Your dog may temporarily relieve his pain by scooting on the ground.  Smaller breeds like Cairn Terrier, Chihuahua, Lhasa  Apso, Toy Poodle, Beagle, Basset Hound and Cocker Spaniel are prone to anal sac problems.   Other signs of anal sac problems can be when your dog chews and licks around his anus.  Dog scooting can also occur when your dog has trouble defecating.   
  2. Fecal contaminationDiarrhea can leave your dog weak, dehydrated and a yucky, matted bottom.  This leftover fecal material can be uncomfortable which makes your dog scoot on your carpet, grass or ground to get rid of it.
  3. Worms – Tapeworms are another reason your dog may start scooting. Your dog could get tapeworms if he swallows worm-infested fleas.  A sign your dog has worms is if you see very small rice-like tapeworm segments around your dog’s anus.
  4. Rectal prolapse – Rectal prolapse refers to the final portion of your dog’s large intestine which protrudes through his anus.  Your dog can develop a rectal prolapse after severe diarrhea or if he strains with constipation which can lead to dog scooting. Take your dog to your vet immediately if you see a stretched out circular mass that sticks out from your dog’s bottom.
  5. Wounds and tumors – Your dog may have a minor cut, splinter or tumor in his anus which can cause him to drag his bottom to get relief.  The most obvious symptom is redness or a discharge around your dog’s anus.

How to Check Your Dog’s Bottom for Health Problems

The only tool you need are rubber gloves to keep your hands clean.  Use these tips to check your dog’s bottom if he’s scooting on your carpet, grass and ground.

  • Visual inspection – Put on a pair of rubber gloves and lift up your dog’s tail. Your dog’s anus and the hair around it should be clean, without a yucky smell. Look for swelling, growths,Dog Scooting discharge, or injury.  Bring your dog to your groomer or your vet to help prevent dog scooting when your dog’s anal area is not clean or has a bad odor.
  • Anal sac problems – Powerful, foul odors around your dog’s bottom indicates an abscess or infection. Bring your dog to your vet immediately to get treatment for your dog’s anal sac problems.
  • Worms – Tapeworm segments look like tiny, wiggly, white worms or small pieces of rice. Bring your dog to your vet immediately If you see either of these signs around your dog’s anus.

Treatments for your Dog’s Scooting Problems

  1. Anal sac problems:  Bring your dog to your vet or groomer to get help to express your dog’s anal sacs with warm compresses.  Your vet may prescribe antibiotics and suggest you increase fiber in your dog’s diet to stop dog scooting behavior.  Your dog’s blocked and inflamed anal sacs may need to be lanced or flushed under general anesthesia.
  2. Fecal contamination: Treatment can be as simple as cleaning your dog’s anal area with a facecloth soaked in warm water.  After you wash your dog’s bottom you can cut away his dirty hair. Be careful you don’t cut your dog’s skin to prevent another wound that could get infected.  You may need to bring your dog to your vet if your dog suffers from diarrhea or constipation to help prevent this problem.
  3. Worms: You can easily treat your dog for tapeworms with a simple dose of oral or injectable medication.  To prevent tapeworms that results in dog scooting behavior you’ll need to keep your dog away from fleas.  Your vet can give you options for safe flea control.  You can add a pinch of garlic powder to your dog’s food or give your dog garlic oil in a capsule as an herbal remedy to help repel fleas.
  4. Rectal prolapse:  Your vet may need to partially stitch up your dog’s anus to prevent his prolapse from recurring.  You may change your dog’s diet to moist food or use stool softeners to reduce your dog from straining due to constipation.  Your dog may need surgery to fully repair his rectal prolapse.

Dog ScootingNow you know about the causes and treatments for your dog’s scooting behavior.  I hope you will check your dog’s bottom even if it’s yucky or smelly so you can stay on top of your dog’s health. 

Share this health article with your friends and family so they know about the causes of dog scooting problems and how to treat their dog when they see signs of things like fecal contamination, tumors or rectal prolapse.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like breaking news on how to NOT overpay for your dog’s healthcare costs and reduce the number of times your dog gets sick, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

Veterinarian Near Me: Bad Vets and How to Avoid Them

veterinarian near me

How to choose the best veterinarian near me and avoid the bad vets might be the first question you want answers to as a new dog owner because your greatest fears include whether or not your dog’s vet will overcharge you, what if your vet can’t treat your dog in an emergency and even worse, what if your vet misdiagnoses your dog’s health symptoms which results in harmful side effects from your dog’s medication prescribed by your vet.

This news brief gives you essential questions you need to ask any veterinarian before you decide to put your dog in their care.  I hope when you read this post you’ll have all the ammunition you need to avoid bad vets near you and keep your dog healthy.

Who is the Best Veterinarian Near Me? Tips to Pick the Right Vet for Any Needs

You may already know how to take care of your dog’s basic health needs like walks and exercise.  These are subtle tips to help you select the best vet for your dog’s professional care.

  • Word of Mouth – Members of your community who’ve used local veterinarians near you for years could be your most valuable source when you need to find a good vet for your dog and avoid the bad vets. Dog owners in your local area will be honest about their vet’s service quality and give you actual examples how their dog’s health emergencies were handled.
  • Friendly Atmosphere – Observe the behavior and attitude of the vet and staff.  Notice the manner in which your questions are answered.  Take of how the vet and staff made you feel.  If you don’t feel comfortable, you may walk out and say to yourself, this is not the best veterinarian near me and continue your search.  Bad vets may not have the best bedside manner which could make you and your dog nervous or anxious at vet visits.
  • Busy Office – There are pros and cons to a busy veterinary office.  A busy waiting room could mean the vet has happy clients and an outstanding reputation… or, sadly the office staff may overbook and you’ll be forced to wait longer for your Veterinarian Near Meappointments.  Ask dog owners in the waiting room how long they usually for their appointment.  Bad vets near you may have a lot of clients because they’re the only vet office in town.  That doesn’t mean their clients are happy with the service or the vet.
  • References – Most vets will give you names of clients who they know will give you a positive reference. Word of mouth references are better because you’ll get the truth about the good and bad vet’s service.

8 Questions to Ask Before You Choose Your Vet

  1. How many veterinarians work at your practice?   You might discover the best veterinarian near me is 5-10 miles further away from your home because you want access to a larger practice with qualified staff on board in case your primary vet is too busy or on vacation.  Sometimes the best vet for your dog is not the nearest one to you if you want the best professional care for your dog. 
  2. What are your office hours and emergency policies?  You want to make sure your vet is open on Saturdays and has an emergency line in case you need help after hours or on holidays.  Ask about local emergency clinics they can refer you to and whether your primary vet will be able to care for your dog at that clinic.
  3. What services does your practice offer?  Overnight boarding services may be on your wish list for the perfect veterinarian near me.  That’s why you need to ask about all the veterinarian near meservices your vet offers.  Check to see if the vet’s practice has an on-site pharmacy.  Find out if the vet’s prices for their products are competitive. There may some bad vets who will overcharge for products which means you need to compare prices before you buy any medications or supplements for your dog. 
  4. Can my primary veterinarian perform surgery?  Your vet may need to refer you to another specialist outside of her practice to perform your dog’s surgery.  Ask for a list of the vets, surgeons and specialists that may treat your dog instead of your primary veterinarian.
  5. What type of equipment do you have on-site? Ask if the practice has x-ray equipment and the ability to do your dog’s blood work on-site.  Your dog’s tests will be done faster and may be less expensive if they are done on-site.
  6. How much is an office visit? You need to know how much it will cost for every visit to your vet.  Ask if there’s an extra charge for emergencies, Sundays and holidays.  When you compare prices for office visits, make sure you look at all the services for veterinarian near meeach vet and pick the one that’s best for you and your dog. You may discover your choice isn’t the same veterinarian near me as your neighbor because you are both looking for different benefits and conveniences like a dog nutritionist and on-site products.
  7. Do you have payment plans? – When your dog has an accident or develops an illness, it’s good to know if your vet has payment plans to help you afford care for your dog.  Find out if the vet will accept your dog health insurance plan to cover  certain services.
  8. What’s your policy on vaccinations, cancer care and euthanasia? Ask about the vet’s policy on annual vaccinations including kennel cough.  It’s helpful to know what to expect if your dog has cancer or when you need to make end of life decisions for your dog.

veterinarian near meNow you know that the best veterinarian near me may not be the closest or the least expensive.   When you get the answers to the questions above you’ll be able to choose a veterinarian near you that suits your needs. 

Share this article with your friends and relatives to make sure they have the questions they need answers to when they look for a veterinarian near them.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Chow Chow Dog: Ancient History and Charming Traits

Chow Chow Dog A Chow Chow dog could be the perfect breed choice for you because your Chow Chow puppy looks like a little lion cub with thick fur around his neck and has the softest coat you’ve ever touched which makes you happy after you hand over your check for $2,500-$4,000…  however you also need to know the long list of possible surgeries for your Chow’s hip dysplasia, cataracts or bloat as well as annual expenses for grooming, treatments for itchy skin and eye conditions.

This news brief will help you understand the health challenges for Chow Chow dogs so you’ll be prepared for the upkeep, maintenance and potential problems you may have with your Chow.

Chow Chow Dog: Breed History and Unique Traits

  • The Chow Chow, called “Dog of the Tang Empire” originates from Northern China and is one of the ancient dog breeds still alive today.
  • Bred as a working dog for guarding, herding, hunting and pulling, Chow Chows were referred to as large war dogs that looked like black-tongued lions.
  • Teddy bears were modeled after Queen Victoria’s Chow Chow puppy because her friends didn’t think she should be seen with a dog.  Instead, they made a stuffed animal version for her to carry.
  • A sturdy breed, your Chow Chow has a square profile, small Chow Chow Dogpointed ears, a dense double coat, and thick fur especially around his neck.  His coat can be red, black/blue, cinnamon/fawn or cream.
  • Your Chow Chow dog has a blue, black or purple tongue which extends to his lips and throat.  The origin of this gene is a mystery and dominant even in mixed breeds.  Chow puppies have pink tongues with a small dot of blue or black that darkens by 8-10 weeks.
  • Other animals with a blue black tongue include the Chinese Shar-Pei, Giraffe, Polar Bear and some cattle like the Jersey.  Deposits of extra pigment like blue or black spots appear on 30 dog breeds which are similar to birthmarks and freckles on people.
  • Other unique traits of your Chow are his deep set eyes, curly tail and post-like straight back legs which give your dog a stiff gait.
  • The American Kennel Club (AKC) registers 10,000 Chow Chows a year and the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) registers 350 a year.

Chow Chow Dog: 6 Possible Health Challenges

  1. Autoimmune Disease – Your Rough Coated Chow Chow is at high risk for skin disease that starts around age 4.  Symptoms include crusty skin and hair loss around your dog’s nose and inside his ear flap.
  2. Bloat – Deep-chested dogs like your Chow Chow may be prone to gastric torsion known as bloat which often requires surgery to save your dog’s life.
  3. Entropion – Your Chow may develop an eye condition where his eyelids turn inward because of the folds in his skin around your dog’s deep set eyes.
  4. Glaucoma – Your Chow Chow may be genetically predisposed to glaucoma, a condition where pressure on your dog’s eye causes poor fluid drainage in his eye.  Glaucoma can be treated by surgery, however it can still decrease your dog’s eyesight.
  5. Hip and Elbow Dysplasia – Your Chow Chow dog may be prone to abnormal hip and elbow sockets that can result in painful arthritis and lameness.
  6. Juvenile Cataracts – Your Chow puppy could develop cataracts, a milky film behind his pupil.  Juvenile cataracts cause clouding in your dog’s eyes and can occur between 6 months to 2 years of age.

Chow Chow DogNote: Your Chow Chow breed is predisposed to many health challenges which could put your dog at risk for pain, surgery or life-long medical care.  Check out dog health insurance as one strategy to manage your dog health expenses.

Chow Chow’s Temperament, Lifespan, Habits and Diet

  • Your Chow Chow can be independent and fiercely protective of you and your property.  Although your Chow might be a great companion, he may not socialize well with strangers and could go from being too timid to too aggressive.  You may even notice a cat-like personality in your Chow.
  • Chow Chows live from 10-12 years, usually weigh from 45-70 pounds and reach a height of 17-20 inches.  Your Chow may have a tendency to drool and snore.  Chows don’t have a tendency to bark or dig and they are easily trained and housebroken as Chow Chow Dogpuppies.
  • Your Chow Chow dog may be laid back and not very active even so he needs at least 20 minutes of daily exercise to prevent boredom and restlessness.
  • The best diet for your Chow is beef, chicken, fish, turkey, veggies and fruit.  Occasionally you can add some yogurt and cooked eggs. 

Tips for Grooming Your Chow Chow

Your Chow Chow sheds like crazy in Spring and Fall which means you’ll find his fluffy fur all over your home especially during these seasons.  Here’s some tips to help you brush your Chow’s coat which can cut down on his shedding and keep him free of fleas:

  • Use a medium coarse brush for larger parts of your Chow’s body, a slick brush for smaller areas and a pin brush for longer strands of hair.
  • Brush your Chow Chow dog 4 times a week or daily in Spring and Fall when your dog is shedding the most.
  • Use a dog spray conditioner to avoid breaking the thick coat of of your Chow’s hair.
  • Give your Chow Chow a monthly bath to avoid fleas and keep him clean.

Now you’ve read about the ancient history and charming traits of the Chow Chow.  I hope it will help you discover if this breed is right for you and your family.  Your fluffy Chow Chow with his distinctive blue tongue could be your close companion for 10-12 years or more.

Share this article about the health challenges of the Chow Chow dog with your friends and family so they know about the possible costs and responsibilities of owning a Chow.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

Chow Chow Dog

Finnegan, the handsome Chow Chow featured in this article, belongs to Peggy Carney who lives in Massachusetts.  Peggy brings Finnegan to assisted living facilities to help bring joy to seniors and make them smile.  Finnegan’s friendly furry face and his laid back personality makes him a perfect visitor for seniors who love dogs.

By the way… claim your FREE “How NOT to Overpay to Keep Your Dog Well” video news.  Just go HERE now to get your Dog Health and Wellness Video News.

Dog Supplies You Need On-Hand for Any Weather Emergency

Dog SuppliesDog supplies like canned or dry food and vital medications for your dog top the list of things you’ll need in weather emergencies like hurricanes or floods when you’re faced with life-threatening conditions, no electrical power and no plumbing… or even worse, you may lose your dog if you let her go outside in a storm to do her business and she runs away because she’s scared and disorientated.

This emergency dog supply checklist will help you plan for any approaching or sudden violent weather like tornadoes and tropical storms or blizzards so you’ll have enough food and necessities to take care of your dog and not have to worry.

Dog Supplies for Any Weather Emergency

You know there are times when you may need to hunker down in a storm or evacuate  your home with your dog.  Use this emergency supply checklist to choose the items you’ll need to care for your dog in any weather emergency.

  • Collars & Tags:  Make sure your dog wears her collar with tags that include your dog’s name, your telephone number and any critical medical information. 
  • First Aid Kit: Small bottles of hydrogen peroxide, apple cider vinegar and coconut oil are good to have in case your dog has cuts or infections. Pack a face cloth, towel, cotton balls and cotton swabs for scrapes or to keep your dogs eyes and body clean and dry.  You may want to add Benadryl to your dog supplies to keep her calm. Ask your vet for a complete list of first aid items to complete your kit.
  • Medications:  Pack a 4 week supply of medications for your dog with health conditions like diabetes and heart disease.  Keep your dog’s medications in a waterproof container.  Rotate her medications so they don’t expire and you’ll always have a fresh supply on hand.
  • Food and Water: Plan to have a 4 week supply of dog food and treats.  You may want to have a dozen feeding dishes and water bowls so you don’t have to wash them out and waste water.  YourDog supplies dog supplies should include a 4 week supply of water for your dog and additional water everyone in your family.  Rotate these supplies so they don’t go bad or expire.
  • Ice packs and cooler – You can store ice packs in your freezer in case your power goes off and you need to cool off your dog or keep your dog’s medication from getting too warm.
  • Trash & Poop Removal:  Stock up on poop disposal bags, paper towels, soap, disinfectant and garbage bags.  Trash bags are critical during a storm to keep your environment clean and avoid bacterial infections.
  • Emergency Indoor Potty – Use a small kiddie pool and put pieces of grass pod in it to create a place for your dog to relieve herself almost like the outdoors. Add newspapers and puppy pads to your dog supplies as a backup to use indoors for your dog’s waste.  Let your dog urinate or poop on some newspaper or a puppy pad before a storm so your dog can find his scent indoors. 
  • Dog travel bag or crate – You may want to have a crate or travel bag ready for your dog in any weather emergency.  SmallDog Supplies dogs may be safer in a dog travel bag if you need to leave your home in a storm, flood or hurricane.  You’ll also need a bag to carry food and supplies in an evacuation from your home.
  • Flashlight – You should have 3 large flashlights and plenty of batteries available if you lose power in a storm.
  • Blankets – Old blankets are perfect dog supplies to protect your dog on you hard basement or tile floor.  You will need blankets to keep your dog warm if your heat goes off in a blizzard.  You may also need blankets to carry your dog out of your home in a weather emergency, flood and high winds.
  • Photos of your dog – Put a dozen photos of your dog with her medical history in case she goes missing in a storm.
  • Toys – Keep a collection of old toys in a waterproof box you can carry.  Your dog will need plenty of toys to play with if you’re unable to go for walks outdoors or if you need to put your dog in a shelter through a storm.

Additional Dog Emergency Services and Protection

Here are 4 precautions to take in addition to the dog supplies listed above.

  1. Rescue Alert Sticker – Display a Rescue Alert Sticker on or near your front door. List the number of dogs in your household, the breeds and the name and number of your veterinarian.  If you leave your home, write “EVACUATED” over the rescue alert sticker.  You can get these stickers at your local pet supply store.
  2. Microchip: If you live in an area that’s prone to disasters you may want to have your dog microchipped In case your dog goes missing in a storm.  Your dog’s microchip can be read in most animal shelters.
  3. Safe Shelter for Your Dog – Lay out a plan for your dog in case of natural disasters like a blizzard or hurricane. Have a list of quality shelters and boarding kennels you can call in an Dog Suppliesemergency.  Find pet friendly hotels and motels in your area and out of state.  Be prepared with a list of friends and relatives who will take in your dog and your dog supplies if needed for her safety.
  4. Dog Caregivers  Arrange for temporary and permanent caregivers for your dog.  This will be a tough decision because of the responsibilities and emotions that surround emergencies that result in dog adoptions if something happens to you.  Whoever you choose must understand the level of care you expect for your dog.

Emergency Tips for Geographic Areas Prone to Disasters

You can get the free ASPCA mobile app that will tell you exactly what to do in a disaster like a flood, blizzard or hurricane.  This app allows you to access advice before, during and after a storm even if there’s no internet connection. You can also get a personalized missing pet recovery kit and be able to create a flyer to share on social media if your dog goes missing.

Dog SuppliesNow you have a list of dog supplies you may need in any catastrophic weather situation which will help you keep your dog safe.  I hope you’ll never need to use your emergency supplies for a real disaster, however your dog depends on your ability to be prepared and to protect her in any weather.

Share this article with your friends and relatives to make sure they have all the information they need about supplies for their dog in any emergency.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

Hope you took some great value out of this article about dog supplies for any emergency today! I’d love to hear your feedback, so leave a comment with your thoughts or questions.  Share your dog’s weather emergency situation below so others can benefit from your story.

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Liver Disease in Dogs: Diagnosis, Causes and Prevention

Liver Disease in DogsLiver disease in dogs could be very tricky to detect because your dog’s symptoms may be similar to other health problems that start off with increased thirst and excessive urination which keeps you up all night or you discover blood in your dog’s feces which scares you to death… and even worse, one day you notice the whites of your dog’s eyes look yellow and your vet informs you that your dog needs an ultrasound to check on his liver damage.

This news brief gives you information about prevention, symptoms and causes of your dog’s liver disease.  I hope when you read this post you’ll find the help you need to restore your dog’s liver and manage his disease.

Liver Disease in Dogs:  Detection, Causes and Prevention

Your dog’s liver removes toxins from his body.  As a vital organ, your dog’s liver helps break down drugs, metabolizes sources of energy, stores vitamins and glycogen, produces bile acids for digestion and manufactures proteins for blood clotting. 

If your dog’s liver isn’t healthy, your dog is at risk for liver disease.

Symptoms of Liver Disease

  • Increased thirst and urination
  • Blood in urine or feces
  • Loss of appetite and weight loss
  • Seizures, ataxia and loss of balance
  • Weakness and confusion
  • Vomiting and diarrhea
  • Jaundice – yellowish color of eyes, tongue, ears or gums
  • Ascites – fluid in belly

Danger:  If liver disease in dogs is not diagnosed early, your dog can develop hepatic encephalopathy,  a brain condition that includes seizures, disorientation, depression, head pressing, blindness, or personality changes.

Causes of Liver Disease

  • Fatty foods and Diabetes
  • Infections, Pancreatitis, trauma or disease that hurts your dog’s liver
  • Medications and painkillers
  • Plants, herbs such as ragwort, mushrooms, blue-green algae
  • Molds that grow on corn
  • Untreated heart worm
  • Aging
  • Genetic – Certain breeds may be predisposed to specific liver conditions. Copper storage disease is a known problem in Bedlington Terriers, Doberman Pinschers, Skye Terriers, and West Highland White Terriers. In these breeds a metabolic defect causes copper to remain in your dog’s liver which leads to chronic hepatitis.

5 Ways to Detect and Prevent Liver Disease in Dogs

  1. Avoid toxins – Keep toxic foods like alcohol, grapes and onions away from your dog.  Toxic substances in your home should be secured and out of your dog’s reach.
  2. Avoid fatty foods – Read labels on your dog’s packaged food to check on the amount of fat in his food. Ask your vet for help to make sure your dog gets a healthy low fat diet that will keep your dog’s liver healthy and prevent obesity or diabetes.
  3. Blood tests – Get annual blood tests that show toxin levels in your dog’s liver.
  4. Ultrasound – Your vet may recommend an ultrasound to check for tumors or cancer in your dog’s liver.
  5. Biopsy – Your vet may recommend a tissue biopsy to test for bacterial infections like Leptospirosis that can lead to liver disease in dogs.

5 Treatments for Your Dog’s Liver Disease

You can choose 1 of these 5 herbal remedies to help your dog with liver disease:

  1. Dandelion Leaf Root Tea – Dandelions help your dog’s digestion, pancreatitis, immune system, kidneys, liver and gallbladder.  Your dog can eat dandelions right out of your backyard as long as you don’t use pesticides or herbicides on Liver Disease in Dogsyour grass. Dry some dandelions and sprinkle a teaspoon into his food.  Make dandelion tea to help with elimination of toxins.  Add 1/4 cup of cool dandelion tea to your dog’s water bowl or mix with his food.  Increase the amount to 1/2 cup for dogs over 20 pounds.
  2. Lemon – The benefits of lemon include liver health and detoxification. Lemon juice even helps keep your dog free of parasites which helps prevent liver disease in dogs.  Use 1/4 teaspoon or less daily for small dogs under 10 pounds.  Use 1 – 2 teaspoons daily for medium to large dogs.  Add 1/2 teaspoon grated, chopped or finely minced lemon to your dog’s food at morning or night.  Keep lemon parts refrigerated in an air tight glass receptacle to keep fresh.
  3. Milk thistle – Sprinkle milk thistle seed powder on your dog’s food to boost immunity, repair and regenerate liver cells and rid your dog of toxins. Recommended daily dosage of milk thistle seed is 2 mg per pound and maximum 100 mg for large dogs
  4. Turmeric – Turmeric, a powerful anti-inflammatory herb, helps as a remedy for cancers, liver disease in dogs and reduction of blood clots. Sprinkle turmeric powder in your dog’s food daily to help with bacterial infections cuts and diarrhea.  Daily dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your dog’s weight and not exceed 2 teaspoons for dogs over 100 pounds.
  5. Wheatgrass – Wheatgrass is one of the best foods for your dog because it contains vitamins, calcium, iron, magnesium and selenium.  Benefits of wheatgrass include increased energy, Liver Disease in Dogsrejuvenates blood, delays aging, repairs DNA, and fights free radicals which helps prevent cancer and liver disease in dogs.  You can buy or grow organic wheatgrass and let your dog eat a few bites with each meal.  Snip off pieces of the wheatgrass and sprinkle on your dog’s food.

Note: Your dog’s liver is the only visceral organ known to regenerate.  This means that you may be able to control your dog’s liver disease with regular vet visits, rigid control of your dog’s diet and review of changes in your dog’s liver enzyme values.

Now you have 5 choices of powerful herbal remedies to help keep your dog’s liver healthy and give your dog a chance for a longer life if he has liver disease.

I hope you got some helpful tips from reading this post on liver disease in dogs.  I’d love to hear your feedback, so make sure you leave a comment below with your thoughts or questions.

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Share this health article on diagnosis, causes and prevention of liver disease with your friends and family so they have the information they need to help their dog who may have liver disease.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Can Dogs Eat Cheese? Yes But Avoid These Ingredients

Can Dogs Eat CheeseCan dogs eat cheese as a healthy snack you can grab out of your refrigerator or is there a slow danger that these tasty cheese treats you give your dog could cause health problems like obesity over the years because you didn’t notice the toxic ingredients in cheese or check out the high calories per ounce which could put your dog at risk.

Read this article and find out what ingredients to avoid in cheese to keep your dog healthy. These insights and tips about cheese will help you prevent your dog from the risks of kidney damage, heart disease and obesity.

Can Dogs Eat Cheese?  Yes, but Avoid these Ingredients and Cheeses

You may already know about the extra calories in cheese, however here’s some ingredients in cheese you also should avoid:

  • Garlic    Your dog may react to garlic and have an upset stomach or diarrhea.  You should avoid any cheese that contains garlic, onions, chives and leeks which are all part of the Allium Can Dogs Eat Cheesefamily and known to be poisonous to dogs.
  • Fat  – Avoid cheeses with high fat content like Boursin, Brie and Cheddar.  Too much fat can lead to pancreatitis and obesity.
  • Salt Can dogs eat cheese with salt? Your dog can become dehydrated and dizzy when he eats cheese with too much salt.  Other signs of salt poisoning may be excessive thirst or urination, kidney damage, high blood pressure, seizures, diarrhea and vomiting.
  • Blue Cheese – Avoid blue cheeses like Roquefort, Gorgonzola and Stilton. The coloring in blue cheese is caused by Penicillium mold cultures which can be poisonous to your dog.

2 Health Dangers of Cheese

  1. Lactose – Your dog may be lactose intolerant.  This means your dog can have gas, bloating, and diarrhea when he eats any type of cheese.
  2. Antibiotics – Dairy products like cheese may reduce the absorption of some antibiotics such as doxycycline. 

Note: Because of the above dangers of lactose, you may want to use peanut butter instead of cheese to give your dog a pill.

3 Good Cheese Choices for Your Dog

Can Dogs Eat CheeseCheese contains benefits like calcium, protein, essential fatty acids and vitamins that can keep your dog healthy.  Now you have the answer to “Can Dogs Eat Cheese?”

You can choose one of these 3 healthy cheeses as a treat for your dog.

  1. Cottage Cheese – You can feel good when you choose cottage cheese as a treat for your dog.  A quarter-cup of cottage cheese gives your dog protein and calcium with only 50 calories and no fat or salt.
  2. Aged cheeses – Cheddar, Swiss and Parmesan cheese have low levels of lactose, however they are high in fat. 
  3. Goat cheese – You can give your dog goat cheese because it’s low in lactose and may work for your lactose-sensitive dog with your vet’s approval.

Safe Amounts of Cheese to Give Your Dog

  • 1/2 ounce 3 times a week – dogs under 10 lbs
  • 1 ounce 3 times a week – dogs 10-50 lbs
  • 2 ounces 3 times a week – dogs over 50 lbs

Can dogs eat cheese? You’ve read what cheeses to avoid and now you have 3 healthy cheese choices to give your dog that will protect him from the dangers of calories, salt and fat.

Share this article on cheese with your friends and family so they have the information they need to choose the best cheeses for their dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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