Veterinarian Near Me: Bad Vets and How to Avoid Them

veterinarian near me

How to choose the best veterinarian near me and avoid the bad vets might be the first question you want answers to as a new dog owner because your greatest fears include whether or not your dog’s vet will overcharge you, what if your vet can’t treat your dog in an emergency and even worse, what if your vet misdiagnoses your dog’s health symptoms which results in harmful side effects from your dog’s medication prescribed by your vet.

This news brief gives you essential questions you need to ask any veterinarian before you decide to put your dog in their care.  I hope when you read this post you’ll have all the ammunition you need to avoid bad vets near you and keep your dog healthy.

Who is the Best Veterinarian Near Me? Tips to Pick the Right Vet for Any Needs

You may already know how to take care of your dog’s basic health needs like walks and exercise.  These are subtle tips to help you select the best vet for your dog’s professional care.

  • Word of Mouth – Members of your community who’ve used local veterinarians near you for years could be your most valuable source when you need to find a good vet for your dog and avoid the bad vets. Dog owners in your local area will be honest about their vet’s service quality and give you actual examples how their dog’s health emergencies were handled.
  • Friendly Atmosphere – Observe the behavior and attitude of the vet and staff.  Notice the manner in which your questions are answered.  Take of how the vet and staff made you feel.  If you don’t feel comfortable, you may walk out and say to yourself, this is not the best veterinarian near me and continue your search.  Bad vets may not have the best bedside manner which could make you and your dog nervous or anxious at vet visits.
  • Busy Office – There are pros and cons to a busy veterinary office.  A busy waiting room could mean the vet has happy clients and an outstanding reputation… or, sadly the office staff may overbook and you’ll be forced to wait longer for your Veterinarian Near Meappointments.  Ask dog owners in the waiting room how long they usually for their appointment.  Bad vets near you may have a lot of clients because they’re the only vet office in town.  That doesn’t mean their clients are happy with the service or the vet.
  • References – Most vets will give you names of clients who they know will give you a positive reference. Word of mouth references are better because you’ll get the truth about the good and bad vet’s service.

8 Questions to Ask Before You Choose Your Vet

  1. How many veterinarians work at your practice?   You might discover the best veterinarian near me is 5-10 miles further away from your home because you want access to a larger practice with qualified staff on board in case your primary vet is too busy or on vacation.  Sometimes the best vet for your dog is not the nearest one to you if you want the best professional care for your dog. 
  2. What are your office hours and emergency policies?  You want to make sure your vet is open on Saturdays and has an emergency line in case you need help after hours or on holidays.  Ask about local emergency clinics they can refer you to and whether your primary vet will be able to care for your dog at that clinic.
  3. What services does your practice offer?  Overnight boarding services may be on your wish list for the perfect veterinarian near me.  That’s why you need to ask about all the veterinarian near meservices your vet offers.  Check to see if the vet’s practice has an on-site pharmacy.  Find out if the vet’s prices for their products are competitive. There may some bad vets who will overcharge for products which means you need to compare prices before you buy any medications or supplements for your dog. 
  4. Can my primary veterinarian perform surgery?  Your vet may need to refer you to another specialist outside of her practice to perform your dog’s surgery.  Ask for a list of the vets, surgeons and specialists that may treat your dog instead of your primary veterinarian.
  5. What type of equipment do you have on-site? Ask if the practice has x-ray equipment and the ability to do your dog’s blood work on-site.  Your dog’s tests will be done faster and may be less expensive if they are done on-site.
  6. How much is an office visit? You need to know how much it will cost for every visit to your vet.  Ask if there’s an extra charge for emergencies, Sundays and holidays.  When you compare prices for office visits, make sure you look at all the services for veterinarian near meeach vet and pick the one that’s best for you and your dog. You may discover your choice isn’t the same veterinarian near me as your neighbor because you are both looking for different benefits and conveniences like a dog nutritionist and on-site products.
  7. Do you have payment plans? – When your dog has an accident or develops an illness, it’s good to know if your vet has payment plans to help you afford care for your dog.  Find out if the vet will accept your dog health insurance plan to cover  certain services.
  8. What’s your policy on vaccinations, cancer care and euthanasia? Ask about the vet’s policy on annual vaccinations including kennel cough.  It’s helpful to know what to expect if your dog has cancer or when you need to make end of life decisions for your dog.

veterinarian near meNow you know that the best veterinarian near me may not be the closest or the least expensive.   When you get the answers to the questions above you’ll be able to choose a veterinarian near you that suits your needs. 

Share this article with your friends and relatives to make sure they have the questions they need answers to when they look for a veterinarian near them.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Chow Chow Dog: Ancient History and Charming Traits

Chow Chow Dog A Chow Chow dog could be the perfect breed choice for you because your Chow Chow puppy looks like a little lion cub with thick fur around his neck and has the softest coat you’ve ever touched which makes you happy after you hand over your check for $2,500-$4,000…  however you also need to know the long list of possible surgeries for your Chow’s hip dysplasia, cataracts or bloat as well as annual expenses for grooming, treatments for itchy skin and eye conditions.

This news brief will help you understand the health challenges for Chow Chow dogs so you’ll be prepared for the upkeep, maintenance and potential problems you may have with your Chow.

Chow Chow Dog: Breed History and Unique Traits

  • The Chow Chow, called “Dog of the Tang Empire” originates from Northern China and is one of the ancient dog breeds still alive today.
  • Bred as a working dog for guarding, herding, hunting and pulling, Chow Chows were referred to as large war dogs that looked like black-tongued lions.
  • Teddy bears were modeled after Queen Victoria’s Chow Chow puppy because her friends didn’t think she should be seen with a dog.  Instead, they made a stuffed animal version for her to carry.
  • A sturdy breed, your Chow Chow has a square profile, small Chow Chow Dogpointed ears, a dense double coat, and thick fur especially around his neck.  His coat can be red, black/blue, cinnamon/fawn or cream.
  • Your Chow Chow dog has a blue, black or purple tongue which extends to his lips and throat.  The origin of this gene is a mystery and dominant even in mixed breeds.  Chow puppies have pink tongues with a small dot of blue or black that darkens by 8-10 weeks.
  • Other animals with a blue black tongue include the Chinese Shar-Pei, Giraffe, Polar Bear and some cattle like the Jersey.  Deposits of extra pigment like blue or black spots appear on 30 dog breeds which are similar to birthmarks and freckles on people.
  • Other unique traits of your Chow are his deep set eyes, curly tail and post-like straight back legs which give your dog a stiff gait.
  • The American Kennel Club (AKC) registers 10,000 Chow Chows a year and the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) registers 350 a year.

Chow Chow Dog: 6 Possible Health Challenges

  1. Autoimmune Disease – Your Rough Coated Chow Chow is at high risk for skin disease that starts around age 4.  Symptoms include crusty skin and hair loss around your dog’s nose and inside his ear flap.
  2. Bloat – Deep-chested dogs like your Chow Chow may be prone to gastric torsion known as bloat which often requires surgery to save your dog’s life.
  3. Entropion – Your Chow may develop an eye condition where his eyelids turn inward because of the folds in his skin around your dog’s deep set eyes.
  4. Glaucoma – Your Chow Chow may be genetically predisposed to glaucoma, a condition where pressure on your dog’s eye causes poor fluid drainage in his eye.  Glaucoma can be treated by surgery, however it can still decrease your dog’s eyesight.
  5. Hip and Elbow Dysplasia – Your Chow Chow dog may be prone to abnormal hip and elbow sockets that can result in painful arthritis and lameness.
  6. Juvenile Cataracts – Your Chow puppy could develop cataracts, a milky film behind his pupil.  Juvenile cataracts cause clouding in your dog’s eyes and can occur between 6 months to 2 years of age.

Chow Chow DogNote: Your Chow Chow breed is predisposed to many health challenges which could put your dog at risk for pain, surgery or life-long medical care.  Check out dog health insurance as one strategy to manage your dog health expenses.

Chow Chow’s Temperament, Lifespan, Habits and Diet

  • Your Chow Chow can be independent and fiercely protective of you and your property.  Although your Chow might be a great companion, he may not socialize well with strangers and could go from being too timid to too aggressive.  You may even notice a cat-like personality in your Chow.
  • Chow Chows live from 10-12 years, usually weigh from 45-70 pounds and reach a height of 17-20 inches.  Your Chow may have a tendency to drool and snore.  Chows don’t have a tendency to bark or dig and they are easily trained and housebroken as Chow Chow Dogpuppies.
  • Your Chow Chow dog may be laid back and not very active even so he needs at least 20 minutes of daily exercise to prevent boredom and restlessness.
  • The best diet for your Chow is beef, chicken, fish, turkey, veggies and fruit.  Occasionally you can add some yogurt and cooked eggs. 

Tips for Grooming Your Chow Chow

Your Chow Chow sheds like crazy in Spring and Fall which means you’ll find his fluffy fur all over your home especially during these seasons.  Here’s some tips to help you brush your Chow’s coat which can cut down on his shedding and keep him free of fleas:

  • Use a medium coarse brush for larger parts of your Chow’s body, a slick brush for smaller areas and a pin brush for longer strands of hair.
  • Brush your Chow Chow dog 4 times a week or daily in Spring and Fall when your dog is shedding the most.
  • Use a dog spray conditioner to avoid breaking the thick coat of of your Chow’s hair.
  • Give your Chow Chow a monthly bath to avoid fleas and keep him clean.

Now you’ve read about the ancient history and charming traits of the Chow Chow.  I hope it will help you discover if this breed is right for you and your family.  Your fluffy Chow Chow with his distinctive blue tongue could be your close companion for 10-12 years or more.

Share this article about the health challenges of the Chow Chow dog with your friends and family so they know about the possible costs and responsibilities of owning a Chow.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

Chow Chow Dog

Finnegan, the handsome Chow Chow featured in this article, belongs to Peggy Carney who lives in Massachusetts.  Peggy brings Finnegan to assisted living facilities to help bring joy to seniors and make them smile.  Finnegan’s friendly furry face and his laid back personality makes him a perfect visitor for seniors who love dogs.

By the way… claim your FREE “How NOT to Overpay to Keep Your Dog Well” video news.  Just go HERE now to get your Dog Health and Wellness Video News.

Dog Cancer: 9 Little Known Herbal Remedies

Dog CancerDog cancer conditions might be the worst news you get from your vet because you don’t know all the decisions you’ll be faced with to treat your dog who has tumors, skin cancer, bone cancer or liver cancer… not to mention the vet visits, possible surgery, chemotherapy and thousands of dollars you may need to spend to keep your dog healthy through her treatment.

This health article gives you 9 little known herbal remedies which may help slow down the growth of your dog’s cancer.  Natural solutions like plants and herbs can boost your dog’s immunity system, reduce inflammation and ultimately give your dog with cancer a chance for a longer life.

Dog Cancer Fighters: 9 Herbal Remedies

Choose 1 of these 9 effective herbal remedies to help your dog fight her specific type of cancer.

  1. Aloe Vera  – Acemannan, a polysaccharide immune stimulant found in aloe vera, may be helpful for your dog with skin cancer.  Acemannan is approved for use as part of therapy for treating fibrosarcoma tumors in dogs.  When you use fresh aloe, cut off the leaf and remove the yellow part of the gel near the leaf.  This Dog Canceryellow part, aloe latex, contains aloin, a chemical that may irritate your dog’s skin if she’s allergic to latex.
  2. Chaga Tea – Chaga, a medicinal fungus, grows on birch trees, looks like dark brown crusty growths and needs to be harvested in a careful sustainable way.  Dog cancer benefits of chaga tea include: immunity booster and biological response modifier, anti-cancer properties, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral.   Put 5-10 chunks of Chaga in a crock pot filled with fresh filtered water. Use medium heat until water turns a dark color.  You can keep chaga tea in your crock pot on low heat as long as you add water every day.  Give your dog up to 1 cup of cool chaga tea daily.  Check with your vet if your dog is diabetic or has a chronic disease to make sure chaga tea won’t interact with her medications.  Chaga tea can help with melanoma, colon and liver cancers as well as lower toxicity after radiation and chemotherapy.
  3. Ginseng – Ginseng, a perennial plant, helps your dog’s immune system, has anti-inflammatory qualities, helps impede dog cancer, and promotes relaxation.  Ginseng is also a powerful antioxidant and promotes longevity. Add up to 1 cup cool ginseng tea to your dog’s water or her food bowl.  If you choose ginseng in capsules, give your dog 1 capsule daily.
  4. Hemp Seed Oil – Hemp seed oil helps your dog fight brain and lung cancer, supports your dog’s immune system and may help with your dog’s non-cancerous, cancerous tumors and inflammation.  Use 1/4 teaspoon daily for dogs under 10 pounds and 1/2 teaspoon daily for dogs over 10 pounds.  Add hemp seed oil daily to your dog’s wet or dry food.
  5. Lemon – Lemon juice acts as a powerful antioxidant and anti-aging remedy which fights dog cancer and tumors.  Use 1/4 Dog Cancerteaspoon or less daily for small dogs under 10 pounds.  Use 1 – 2 teaspoons daily for medium to large dogs.  Add 1/2 teaspoon grated, chopped or finely minced lemon to your dog’s food at morning or night.  Keep lemon parts refrigerated in an air tight glass receptacle to keep fresh.
  6. Marjoram – Add marjoram as an all-purpose herb to boost your dog’s immune system and give your dog these benefits: anti-bacterial, anti-carcinogen, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory.  Marjoram is high in beta carotenes, essential oils, lutein & xanthins, iron, and vitamins A, C & K which help fight dog cancer.  Sprinkle marjoram powder in your dog’s food.  Pour cool marjoram tea in your dog’s water or food bowl.  Marjoram is also available in capsules.  Dosage for small dogs:  Pinch of powder,  1/2 capsule, up to 1/4 cup tea.  Dosage for medium to large dogs: 1-2 teaspoons daily, 1 capsule, 1/2 – 1 cup tea.
  7. Olive Leaf Extract – Olive leaf extract helps hinder cancer growth.  A recommended dosage of olive leaf extract is 100 mg capsule daily for dogs under 20 pounds and 250-500 mg capsule daily for medium to large dogs.
  8. Quassia Bark – Benefits of quassia bark include anti-viral, anti-tumor and anti-cancerous qualities.  You can use 1-2 drops of quassia bark tincture in your dog’s food daily.
  9. Turmeric – Turmeric, a powerful anti-inflammatory herb, helps as a remedy for dog cancer.  Curcumin, a pain reliever, is the bio-Dog Canceractive compound in turmeric which gives it a bright orange color.  Sprinkle turmeric powder in your dog’s food daily to help with your dog’s cancer.  Daily dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your dog’s weight and not exceed 2 teaspoons for dogs over 100 pounds.

Now you have 9 choices of powerful herbal remedies for your dog’s cancer to help boost your dog’s immune system, reduce inflammation and give your dog a chance for a longer, healthier life while she fights her cancer.

I hope you got some helpful tips from reading this post on dog cancer.  I’d love to hear your feedback, so make sure you leave a comment below with your thoughts or questions.

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Arthritis in Dogs: Safe Herbal Cures to Comfort a Dog

Arthritis in DogsArthritis in dogs will significantly change your activities with your dog because she’s in so much pain she can’t go on walks and no longer jumps high enough to catch a frisbee or chase her favorite ball… even worse you may have to carry your dog up and down stairs and clean up her piddles and poops because sometimes she’s not always able to make it outside to do her business, and you may have spent lots of money on physical therapy to help your dog reduce her joint stiffness and pain.

This health brief gives you a choice of essential oils, herbs and anti-inflammatory food to help reduce your dog’s arthritic pain and swelling so she’s more comfortable, plus herbs typically have no side effects.  It’s possible you may also reduce your dog health expenses with herbal solutions.

Arthritis in Dogs:  Prevent Structural Damage & Repair Tissue around Joints

  • Structural damage – Arthritis weakens your dog’s bones and causes joint inflammation.  Sadly, your dog’s structural damage can’t be corrected with supplements, food or prescription drugs.  The same is true for people.  Scar tissue, calcium deposits and torn cartilage can continue to give your arthritic dog discomfort for the rest of her life.
  • Inflammation – The key to reduce your dog’s pain from arthritis is to reduce inflammation which will help your dog’s body to repair and strengthen tissues surrounding her joints.

5 Topical Herbal Remedies to Comfort Your Dog

Choose 1 of these 5 essential oils or herbs to help relieve your dog’s muscle aches, inflammation and joint pain.

  1. Arnica – Rub arnica gel or cream directly into your dog’s skin 3-Arthritis in Dogs4 times daily to naturally relieve inflammation and stiffness. 
  2. Eucalyptus Oil – Mix 50/50 eucalyptus oil and coconut oil and massage it into your dog’s skin around her hips and knees for relief from the pain of arthritis in dogs.
  3. Hemp Seed Oil You can apply hemp seed oil on your dog’s skin daily to reduce inflammation and promote healthy cellular growth.  Hemp seed oil goes deeper into your dog’s skin than other oils which only coat the surface of her skin.
  4. Lemon Juice  A 50/50 mixture of lemon juice and green tea applied to your dog’s arthritic joints can help reduce inflammation and ward off ticks and fleas.
  5. Peppermint – Dilute peppermint oil with coconut oil and rub it into your dog’s skin around the areas of her arthritis.  Peppermint can numb the pain of arthritis in dogs to comfort her, and it may give your dog enough relief to increase her flexibility.

Anti-Inflammatory Food to Help Reduce the Pain of Arthritis

  • Diet – Eliminate processed foods and switch your dog to a diet of grass-fed meats. Ingredients in packaged dog food can cause inflammation in your dog’s joints.
  • Fats – Add Omega-3 to balance your dog’s fats in her diet.  Omega-3 lubricates your dog’s joints and helps to reduce inflammation.
  • Antioxidants – You can add foods loaded with antioxidants to further reduce your dog’s inflammation.  Wild blueberries, cranberries and goji berries give your dog high amounts of vitamin E, C and beta-carotene.  Add a pinch of these herbs in your dog’s food every day for additional antioxidant power: basil, cinnamon, ginger, oregano or parsley.

Note:  Check with your veterinarian before you give vaccinations, steroids and prescription drugs to your arthritic dog because the side Arthritis in Dogseffects could lead to joint damage, gastric ulcers or liver and kidney problems.

Now you can choose 1 of these 5 herbal remedies for your dog’s arthritis to reduce inflammation and eliminate her aches and pains.

I hope you received some great tips from reading this post on arthritis in dogs.  I’d love to hear your feedback, so make sure you leave a comment below with your thoughts or questions.

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Share this article with your friends and family so they have the information to help their arthritic dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Meningitis in Dogs: Keys to Unravel Causes & Symptoms

Meningitis in DogsMeningitis in dogs often has unknown causes that affect your dog’s central nervous system, which may result in chronic pain and severe seizures for your dog as well as bills for thousands of dollars to get MRI’s, ultrasounds and dozens of laboratory tests just to discover the treatments for meningitis to try to determine what’s wrong with your dog, which may not shed light on the cure … and even worse, you may never know how your dog got this life-threatening disease.

This news alert gives you 6 keys to unravel causes and symptoms of meningitis or inflammation in your dog’s brain and spinal cord.  Puppies and older dogs with lowered immune systems are at greatest risk for catching meningitis.

6 Possible Causes of Meningitis in Dogs

Meningitis often develops as a secondary infection that may start in your dog’s ears or nose.  Frequently, this disease results from a virus or irregular immune system response and can be idiopathic which means the cause is unknown. 

Possible causes of your dog’s meningitis:

  1. Bacterial infections – Your dog may have an infection of his ears, eyes or nose.  These infections can reach your dog’s brain and spinal cord through his blood. 
  2. Parasites – Infections like distemper, parvo and rabies can spread to your dog’s central nervous system and cause inflammation that leads to neurological damage.
  3. Lyme disease  Another possible cause of meningitis in dogs may be lyme disease which could lead to inflammation of membranes surrounding your dog’s brain and spinal cord.
  4. Toxins – Drugs and vaccines can also lead to inflammation of your dog’s nervous system. 
  5. Steroids – Steroid responsive meningitis occurs when the walls of your dog’s arteries become inflamed.
  6. Breeds – Some dog breeds like Pugs, Beagles and Bernese Mountain Dogs are susceptible to meningitis.

Symptoms of Your Dog’s Meningitis       

Your dog may have already shown the symptoms below:

  • Muscle spasms, seizures and weakness in his legs, neck and back
  • Head tilting, unsteady walking and sensitivity to your touch
  • Lethargy, weakness and depression
  • Fever, vomiting and low blood pressure

Advanced cases of meningitis in dogs can result in:

  • Uncontrolled movements and loss of muscle coordination or ataxia
  • Blindness and paralysis
  • Confusion, depression and aggression

Caring for Your Dog with Meningitis    

Since meningitis is a progressive disease in dogs, the best care you can give your dog is to reduce his inflammation and keep him hydrated.  Ask your veterinarian for all the options you can choose to make your dog as comfortable as possible.

Unfortunately, there are no clear-cut answers to how your dog gets meningitis.  This article gives you 6 keys to help you unravel the possible causes of meningitis in dogs so you can have some tips which I hope will guide you to new ways to comfort your dog.  If your dog hasn’t yet come down with meningitis, then I hope these 6 keys to help you unravel the causes of meningitis will help you prevent your dog from catching this life-threatening disease.

Share this news brief with your friends and family so they know that early detection and treatment of meningitis in dogs is crucial to prevent your dog from life-threatening neurological damage.

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Insurance for Dogs: Flexible Coverage for Any Budget

 

Insurance for Dogs

The reason you need insurance for dogs like yours is because 1 out of 3 dogs suffer from an accident or injury before they turn 3 years old and it isn’t until you’re faced with a $3,000 bill for your dog’s emergency room services after she swallows a bottle of your Ibuprofen that you wish you had signed her up for dog health insurance.

This news brief will help you make sense out of the confusing insurance jargon you may have already read.  After reading this article, you’ll be clear about what’s covered and not covered through insurance.  Most people may not know that dog health insurance provides you flexible payment options that will fit any budget to keep your dog healthy. 

Insurance for Dogs:  What’s Covered and Not Covered

What’s Covered:

  1. Illnesses, Injuries, Accidents – With dog health insurance, your dog will be covered for treatment of new accidents, illnesses and injuries after your enrollment.  You may have a 2 week waiting period for dog insurance companies to check out your Insurance for Dogsdog’s medical records and notes from your veterinarian that would show pre-existing conditions which could prevent approval of insurance coverage.
  2. Hereditary and Congenital Conditions – Some dog health insurance companies cover your dog for hereditary and congenital conditions like eye disorders or knee issues.  This means that your dog could qualify for insurance coverage even if you may have thought these conditions were considered pre-existing.
  3. Unlimited Lifetime Benefits   Look for insurance for dogs with no annual or per incident limits.  Shop around for a plan with no incident caps or maximum limits.
  4. Customized Reimbursement – You can create a flexible plan that fits your budget with deductibles and reimbursement levels you can change as needed.
  5. Veterinarians, Hospitals, Specialists – You can select a dog Insurance for Dogsinsurance company that allows you to use any licensed veterinarian including animal emergency hospitals and specialists.  Your dog’s coverage includes: diagnostic testing, x-rays, hospitalization and treatments, surgeries and prescriptions.
  6. Hip Dysplasia – You can get lifetime coverage for your dog’s hip dysplasia, however you need to enroll your dog before she turns 6 years old.  Maryland and New Hampshire are the only states in the U.S. that don’t have a 12 month waiting period before hip dysplasia coverage takes effect.  This means you need to sign up for insurance for dogs with hip dysplasia before your dog is 5 years old for this coverage which requires a complete physical hip exam.

What’s Not Covered:

  1. Pre-existing conditions – Your dog may have a pre-existing condition like allergies or diabetes that has been treated by your veterinarian before your dog’s health insurance coverage starts.  No dog insurance company covers pre-existing conditions.
  2. Veterinarian exams – Annual veterinarian visits are not covered because this is part of the responsibility of dog ownership.
  3. Spay/neuter procedures – These procedures are not covered by dog insurance companies because they don’t qualify as an illness, injury or accident.
  4. Preventative care Insurance for dogs does not cover vaccinations or a titer test, heart-worm medication, de-worming, grooming and nail trim.
  5. Dental care – Your dog’s dental cleanings and care are not covered.  The only exceptions are when your dog’s teeth are injured in an accident which requires extractions or reconstruction.
  6. Behavioral treatments – Training, medications for behavioral conditions and therapy for behavioral modification is not covered by dog health insurance.
  7. Parasite control – Prophylactic treatments for internal and external parasites are not covered by dog insurance companies.
  8. Housing, Exercise and Food  Dog health insurance does not cover the cost of your dog’s housing, exercise, toys, treats and food.

This news brief gives you all the information you need to know about what’s covered and not covered by insurance for dogs.  You can use these points to find flexible insurance coverage for your dog that fits any budget.

Share this article with your friends and family so they have a checklist to use when they look for health insurance coverage for their dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Dog Farts:  6 Ways to Minimize Your Dog’s Smelly Gas

Dog Farts

Dog farts sneak up on you quietly until you notice something smells rotten and you can’t breathe because your dog shamelessly stinks up your home and embarrasses you in front of your friends and family with her farts.  Your dog’s foul smelling farts, however, might be a clue that she suffers from a dangerous health condition like Pancreatitis or inflammatory bowel disease.

This article helps you understand what causes your dog to expel smelly gas so you can rule out any serious dog health disorders and discover solutions that keep your dog healthy.  If your dog doesn’t have a serious health condition, you may be able to also eliminate or minimize your dog’s farts with the tips below.

6 Reasons Your Dog Farts

  1. Breed Predisposition – Brachycephalic dogs with pushed in faces like Boston Terriers, Boxers and Bulldogs are prone to flatulence because they tend to eat quickly and inhale more air with their food when they swallow.
  2. Diet – Bacterial fermentation from indigestible carbohydrates like meat products or soybeans creates stinky dog gas.  Toxic substances, overfeeding and a sudden change in your dog’s diet can increase your dog’s flatulence and result in bad odors that escape as a fart.
  3. Intestinal Parasites – Parvovirus and Giardia are examples of intestinal parasites which can give your dog’s gas a foul smell. 
  4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease – Your dog may have food allergies or leaky gut disorders that create fermentation and smelly dog farts.
  5. Pancreatitis – Infections to your dog’s pancreas can cause flatulence and result in a foul odor when your dog releases gas.
  6. Antibiotics – Medications for your dog’s medical conditions may also give your dog gas and have a distinctly sour smell.

Note:  Bring your dog to your veterinarian when your dog’s gas has a pungent odor.  Early detection of dangerous health conditions can help you prevent your dog from discomfort and save you thousands of dollars in dog health expenses.    

6 Tips to Eliminate Your Dog’s Smelly Gas

These tips may help reduce the odor of your dog’s farts and make your home smell fresher: 

1. Diet – Give your dog ground turkey, canned pumpkin and cooked sweet potato to help reduce excessive gas.  Ask your veterinarian to help you with a nutritionally balanced diet for your dog to help dog farts.   Change from commercially processed dog food to fresh home-cooked food. 

2. Portions – Feed your dog smaller portions to reduce bacterial fermentation that could cause smelly dog gas. 

3. Exercise – Give your dog plenty of exercise to burn off calories and help reduce her flatulence.

4. Poops & Piddles – Walk your dog for at least 30 minutes after meals so she can avoid constipation or diarrhea.  Consistent daily urine and fecal elimination can help keep your dog’s intestines clean which reduces smelly gas.

5. Herbal remedies – Add a pinch of black pepper or parsley to your dog’s meals to help reduce gas. You can also pour some cool chamomile tea in your dog’s water bowl to soothe stomach upsets that may cause dog farts.

6. Diffuser – Add 3 drops of peppermint or lavender essential oil to your room diffuser to make your home smell fresh.

This article gives you 6 reasons your dog releases foul gas which could help you discover an infection like Pancreatitis in time to prevent further damage to your dog’s health. You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

Share your stories about flatulence so dog parents can learn from your experience and help their dogs who may have smelly gas.

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Dog Seizures: Real Stories to Clarify Your Challenge

Dog Seizures

Dog seizures may start suddenly in the still of the night when you hear your dog cry and find him sprawled on the floor in a pool of his own vomit.  These short epileptic seizures can last less than a minute, however you and your dog could end up exhausted at an emergency animal clinic after several visits to more than one vet for tests and evaluations. You may be so frustrated that you wonder if there’s a light at the end of the tunnel or whether you’ll eventually lose your dog from these violent seizures.

This news story gives you 2 insightful seizure submissions sent to Dog Health News from dog owners who shared their struggle with their dogs‘ seizures. My hope is you’ll be able to glean information from their stories to help you cope with your dog’s seizures.  I understand your pain when you see your dog experience his seizure and how difficult it may be for you to find a satisfactory solution.

Dog Seizures Submissions to Dog Health News

You may already know that all dog breeds can suffer from seizures at an early age. Statistics show idiopathic seizures could occur in 6% of dogs.

This means you need to know what you should do for your dog so you don’t panic or cause harm to your dog during his seizure if he shows symptoms like: convulsions, excessive panting and vomiting.

The dog parent seizure submissions below illustrate why it’s so important for you to now notice changes in your dog’s behavior, muscle strength and energy level.  Your dog may need to have blood work and x-rays, take prescription drugs and require continual care which could lead to high dog health expenses. 

Dog SeizuresDog health insurance may help you cover some of your medical expenses.

Now, Phenobarbital and Zonisamide are epileptic drugs used as anticonvulsants.  However, your dog may experience side effects from these drugs like: ataxia, anxiety, weight gain and loss of muscle control. 

Check with your veterinarian for all the details related to your dog’s specific condition before you give your dog these drugs.

Kimberly’s Dog Seizures Submission

“My 3 year old Chihuahua suddenly developed weakness, stiffening of the neck and back and yelping as if in pain. I would hold him until he was comfortable, and he would stop crying. This left him extremely tired. 

We took him to the vet and was told he is having epileptic seizures. The blood work showed nothing .

It did appear that it was some sort of episode.  After being on Phenobarbital for 3 long weeks he is still doing all the same things. 

Finally we took him to an emergency clinic, and they did full x-rays, and showed us a tiny separation in his neck vertebrae. He is now on muscle relaxers and pain meds. 

He seems to be much better until during the night he had another episode.”

Kristina’s Dog Seizures Submission

“I have an 11 month old Siberian Husky that has short seizures very frequently.

The seizures began 3 days after he was neutered when he was 7 months old. 

He vomits and then immediately has a 30-40 second seizure. The first vet prescribed Phenobarbital twice per day after a standard blood, urine, and fecal analysis.  Diagnosis: Epilepsy. 

The longest he would go without a seizure was 2 weeks. 

The second vet tested his blood extensively and tested for a liver shunt.  All is normal except that his red blood cells are smaller than normal.  Diagnosis: Epilepsy. 

They prescribed Zonisamide. He went 2 1/2 weeks without a seizure on both medicines. 

Now we are trying to ween him off of the Phenobarbital and he has seizures every week and a half. The second vet suggests we play it by ear at this point. 

He may have to take both medicines, but we don’t want him to die of liver failure at a young age because of it.

The only other option is an MRI and spinal tap which costs well beyond what we can afford right now.

My question is even if we have an MRI and find out he has some other neurological problem, is there really any other medications that will change his status?

I know there are other anti-seizure medications, but is there really going to be a light at the end of this?

Did the anesthesia from his neutering cause this?  Every time he vomits, even if he just ate some grass because his belly didn’t feel good, he has a seizure. 

At first we thought seizures were his trauma reaction from eating things he shouldn’t have like plastic or pieces of a toy.  He’s so young and I don’t want to lose him to a grand mal.”

4 Dog Seizures Management Tips

  1. Prevention – Eliminate salty treats or food that contain potassium bromide which may lead to your dog’s seizures.
  2. Medication – Be careful about administering medication to control your dog’s epileptic seizures.  Any disruption in dosage may aggravate or initiate seizures.
  3. Diet – Medications for seizure control can cause weight gain so you may want to ask your veterinarian to help you with a diet plan for your dog.
  4. Herbal Remedy – You can use Turmeric, a powerful pain reliever and anti-inflammatory herb to help with your dog’s Dog Seizuresepilepsy.  Daily dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your dog’s weight and not exceed 2 teaspoons for dogs over 100 pounds.

This news story gave you first-hand accounts surrounding dog seizures so you’re aware of the symptoms related to epileptic seizures and specific questions you can ask your veterinarian. 

I want you to know that dog seizures are almost never fatal.  Your goal should be to reduce the frequency of your dog’s epileptic episodes so you minimize your dog’s suffering and manage his condition.

You can also submit your dog seizure experience and your solutions in the comment section below.

Share this article with other people you know who face challenges with their dog’s epileptic seizures.

I hope you received value from this article today.  I’d love to hear your feedback.  Leave your comments with your thoughts or questions.  Also, you can click on the social media links below to share this article… Thank you!

Chubby Dogs: 7 Ways Your Plump Pooch May Cost You More

Chubby DogsChubby dogs may be the cutest canines on your street, get lots of love and make everyone smile, however their extra pounds can be the cause of dozens of health issues that will make these overweight dogs suffer and rack up expensive medical bills at your vet.  It’s hard to say no when your dog begs for treats until one day you notice he’s twice the size he was last year and your veterinarian tells you to cut back on his food because your dog could develop diabetes or a heart condition that will add lifelong dog health expenses and potentially shorten your dog’s life.

This news brief gives you 7 ways your pudgy dog could cost you more in health expenses so you’ll understand the consequences of canine obesity.

7 Ways Chubby Dogs are in Danger of Expensive Health Risks

  1. Knees  – Extra weight can put your dog at risk for knee and leg injuries and your dog may need cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) surgery.  The average cost for CCL surgery is $3,500 without dog health insurance coverage.  Additional costs are for physical therapy that can run as high as $100 per visit as needed.
  2. Arthritis – Inflammation around your dog’s joints builds up with more pounds to carry around and your dog may develop a limp or become lame from the pain he suffers with arthritis.  You may need to spend $1,000 or more to treat your dog’s arthritis, provide a dog wheelchair and pay for medicine to reduce your dog’s pain and arthritic symptoms.
  3. Hygiene – Urinary tract infections (UTI’s) increase when chubby dogs can’t reach areas to clean because of their body weight.  The cost to treat UTI’s can be more than $500 each time your dog gets an infection.
  4. Back – If your dog carries 5-10 pounds over his healthy weight Chubby Dogsthere’s a good chance he’ll have back problems sooner or later.  Corgis, Dachshunds and Basset Hounds are prone to intervertebral disc disease (IDD) which can result in surgery that can be more than $2,000.  However, back problems are common in all breeds when your dog is overweight.
  5. Cancer – Obesity in dogs can often be one cause of cancerous tumors.  The cost for tests and treatment for your dog with cancer is over $2,000.  Medical expenses can be a minor point for your family compared to what your dog must endure with this disease.
  6. Stomach – Too many treats, large portions of food and reduced exercise can contribute to your dog’s weight gain. The consequences for chubby dogs can be things like an upset tummy, gas, diarrhea, liver disease, vomiting and dehydration.  The cost for vet visits to solve these health problems add up over the years.  Stomach-related health issues are one of the most common reason for vet visits and thousands of dog owners are unpleasantly surprised with average bills of $500 – $1,000.
  7. Diabetes – Table scraps, pieces of pizza, bites of cookies and treats loaded with carbohydrates and fat could be the catalyst for your dog to develop diabetes.  If your dog suffers from diabetes, you are faced with daily responsibility for his health and additional dog health expenses throughout your dog’s life.  The estimated annual cost starts at $1,000 to cover vet visits and blood sugar maintenance.

Tips to Prevent Canine Obesity

  • Exercise – Light to moderate exercise for at least 30 minutes a Chubby Dogsday helps keep your healthy dog from growing into the obese weight category of chubby dogs.
  • Diet – Work with your vet so you feed your dog a breed specific nutritionally balanced diet with limited treats for being a good dog.
  • Habits – Bad habits are hard to break, however your dog depends on your help to keep him at his healthy weight.  It’s never too late to change your habits like limiting treats to once a day.  Obesity can shorten your dog’s life, reduce his quality of life and even worse, you may face tough decisions when presented with a big bill to pay because your dog is overweight.

This article gives you reasons to keep your dog at his healthy weight to prevent him from the risks of obesity including extra expenses to care for a chubby dog.

Share this article with your friends and family so they have information on the dangers faced by overweight dogs and the costs to cover their health expenses.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Dog Head Tilt: What’s Right or Wrong About This Habit?

Dog Head TiltDog head tilt normally looks like your dog wants to express herself or she wants to get your attention, however when your dog tilts her head too often, loses her balance and has strange eye movements, you need to bring your dog to your veterinarian immediately for a checkup to see if your dog has underlying health problems that could affect her central nervous system.

This news brief gives you signs to watch for when your dog tilts her head so you know when to take action before your dog’s health is at risk from Ataxia which results in loss of coordination of your dog’s limbs, trunk and head.

Dog Head Tilt: 7 Signs of Ataxia

  1. Tilting head – Your dog may start to have abnormal behavior and tilt her head to one side.  She might have a loss of balance or have vertigo and feel dizzy.  Unusual head movements could indicate nerve damage and discomfort in your dog’s head and neck area.
  2. Hearing loss – Your dog may not react to your vocal commands as quickly as usual and you might realize you have to raise your voice higher to get her attention.
  3. Weak limbs – Your dog may start to favor one leg more than another or have noticeable weakness in one or more limbs.  Even without signs of dog head tilt, your dog might have difficulty on stairs, walking or jumping because her limbs are not strong enough to hold her weight.  In the worst cases, your dog won’t be able to hold her legs up at all.
  4. Stumbling – Although puppies fall over easily, your healthy adult dog should stand up straight on all four legs and have excellent balance.  Bring your dog to your vet if your dog continuously falls over, sways or stumbles.
  5. Drowsiness – If your dog is excessively tired or seems unfocused, she may have health issues related to her head, nerves and brain area with no instances of dog head tilt.  An active dog may get tired, however it’s not normal for your dog to have a low energy level and act like she’s in a stupor.
  6. Appetite loss – Your dog may suffer from motion sickness if she has vertigo or balance problems which can result in nausea and a lack of appetite.
  7. Behavior change – Take your dog to your local veterinarian if your dog’s energy level changes or she shows abnormal behavior.

Cricket Ditty – Challenges and Solutions for Dogs with Ataxia

Dog Head TiltMargaret Ditty discovered her dog Cricket had Ataxia when her 7 year old Chihuahua started losing her balance, falling over and exhibiting moments of exaggerated dog head tilt.  Cricket has Granulomatous Meningoencephalitis (GME) as a result of a vaccination at age 7.  You can learn more about GME from Margaret’s stories on her site, Pet Parents Fighting GME.

These 2 videos show Cricket struggling to stand up on a wood floor and Cricket walking down the hall with her custom designed wheelchair.

3 Types of Ataxia

  1. Sensory – Your dog’s spinal cord becomes compressed gradually.  Symptoms to watch for are when your dog misplaces her feet and her limbs become weak.  This condition can start with cerebral lesions in your dog’s brain near her neck.
  2. Vestibulocochlear – Damage to this nerve in your dog’s inner ear can cause hearing problems, dog head tilt and change your dog’s head and neck position.  Your dog may tend to lean over, tip over and even roll over.
  3. Cerebellar – Your dog may have uncoordinated movement, head tremors and swaying of her body. 

Causes of Ataxia

  • Spinal cord – Your dog’s ataxia may be caused by things like degeneration of nerves, loss of blood from a blood clot, malformation, cancer, as spinal cyst, infections or a trauma to her spinal cord.
  • Metabolic – Your dog may be anemic or have low blood sugar and low potassium levels.
  • Neurologic – Your dog may contract an inflammatory anti-immune disease to her central nervous system.
  • Vestibular – Your dog may get a fungal infection in her middle ear which can affect her peripheral nervous system and lead to dog head tilt.

Diagnosis of Ataxia Symptoms

  • Health history – Whenever your dog shows abnormal behavior, it’s critical to keep a journal so you can give your veterinarian a clear, step by step description of your dog’s illness with actual dates when symptoms were noticed.
  • Tests – Your veterinarian may order tests including blood counts, urinalysis, MRI and X-rays to determine if your dog has cancer.  Your dog may need an ultrasound to check her pancreas, liver and kidney function.
  • Expenses – 
  • If you have dog health insurance, some of your expenses may be covered, however you can expect initial bills to add up to over $3,000 if your dog has Ataxia.

Treatment for Your Dog with Ataxia and Dog Head Tilt

  • Drugs –  Consult with your veterinarian about drugs to treat your dog with Ataxia if your dog experiences pain from inflammation.  Ask your vet about alternative medicines and all potential side effects.
  • Exercise – Your dog’s motor skills may be limited and you might need to make changes in your home to help your dog from sliding on slippery floors. 
  • Products – Look into products that might help your dog grip the floor better or dog wheelchairs that allow your dog more mobility.

This news brief gives you information about symptoms, causes, diagnosis and treatment of Ataxia so you can take better care of your dog.  Much thanks to Margaret Ditty and Cricket for the work they are doing to help dog parents.  Awareness of signs of diseases can make a huge difference because you’ll know when to bring your dog to your local vet or emergency animal hospital if needed.

Share this article with your friends and family so they can watch for signs of abnormal or excessive dog head tilt in their dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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