Lyme Disease: Protect your Dog From Tick Bite Threats

Lyme DiseaseLyme Disease threatens your dog’s health because ticks know how easy it is to latch onto your dog’s body for a tasty meal.  Large populations of these bloodsuckers lounge around all year in places like woody trails and campgrounds where you take your dog for walks or enjoy vacations with your family. 

There’s no magic bullet to stop the spread of ticks because climate change and reforestation has widened the range for tick infestation. What’s more frightening is that warmer winters allow hosts for ticks to survive longer.

This news brief gives you tips to help you protect your dog against tick bites and prevent these nasty parasites from zapping your dog’s energy.  I hope this article helps you understand why it’s so important to check your dog for ticks every day to protect your dog from tick bite threats.

Symptoms of Dog Lyme Disease

Your dog will not show the bull’s eye rash that appears on people who have lyme.  Symptoms associated with dog lyme include:

  • Pain – Your dog may start to whine or have behavior that shows he’s uncomfortable due to headaches and swollen joints.
  • Fever – Watch for increased panting or lack of energy that could mean your dog has a fever.
  • Lack of appetite – Your dog may be lethargic and not be Lyme Diseaseinterested in food or treats.
  • Lameness – Joint pain from inflammation can be a sign of lyme.  Bring your dog to your veterinarian to have him checked for Lyme Disease if he favors all four legs.

8 Places on Your Dog’s Body to Look for Ticks

  1. Hair  Spend 15-30 minutes with a comb to check your dog’s skin and hair for ticks.
  2. Ears – Search around the edges of your dog’s ear flaps and inside his ears for ticks.
  3. Muzzle – Check your dog’s entire mouth including his gums, tongue and cheeks.
  4. Face – Look at all parts of your dog’s face, eyebrows and under his chin.
  5. Neck – Remove your dog’s collar and make sure there are no ticks around his neck.
  6. Paws – Look carefully in between your dog’s toes for ticks or redness.
  7. Hidden areas – Check out private areas where your dog can’t see the ticks or reach them.
  8. Vascular areas – Check your dog’s body where you’ll find blood sources like behind your dog’s knees, on his back and under his belly.

Lyme DiseaseLyme Disease Protection for your Dog

It’s a big mistake to stop tick control for your dog in winter months.  Ticks even come out on a day over 40 degrees to look for a host like your dog for a good meal.

Take these steps to protect your dog:

  • Avoid ticks – Keep your dog away from places where ticks hide like wet grassy areas, high grass and bushes, shaded areas and roughs on golf courses.
  • Herbal remedies – You can mix 3-6 drops of 100% pure therapeutic grade peppermint essential oil in a spray bottle of unrefined coconut oil. Spray this natural tick repellant mixture over your dog’s body.  Keep the spray away from your dog’s eyes and nose.  Other essential oils you can choose to repel ticks include: lavender, lemon, citronella, sage, bergamot, cedar wood, eucalyptus, lemongrass, geranium, sweet orange, or rosemary.  Only use one essential oil at a time on your dog.
  • Daily check for ticks – The best way to keep your dog safe from Lyme Disease is to check your dog daily especially if you live in areas where ticks are known to thrive.
  • Remove ticks quickly – You can kill ticks on your dog within 24 hours of a bite to prevent the disease from being transmitted to your dog.

Important Note:  Tick repellants, insecticides and natural products can’t give you a 100% guarantee your dog won’t get bitten by a tick.

This article gives you tips to help you protect your dog against the health threats of tick bites.  Even though it takes time to check your dog for ticks every day, you may save your dog from a life long battle against Lyme Disease

If you liked these Dog Health News tips to protect your dog from tick bites, leave a comment below.  Share your stories about ticks so dog parents can benefit from your dog’s experience and solutions.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like breaking news on how to NOT overpay for your dog’s healthcare costs and reduce the number of times your dog gets sick, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

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Dog Seizures: Real Stories to Clarify Your Challenge

Dog Seizures

Dog seizures may start suddenly in the still of the night when you hear your dog cry and find him sprawled on the floor in a pool of his own vomit.  These short epileptic seizures can last less than a minute, however you and your dog could end up exhausted at an emergency animal clinic after several visits to more than one vet for tests and evaluations. You may be so frustrated that you wonder if there’s a light at the end of the tunnel or whether you’ll eventually lose your dog from these violent seizures.

This news story gives you 2 insightful seizure submissions sent to Dog Health News from dog owners who shared their struggle with their dogs‘ seizures. My hope is you’ll be able to glean information from their stories to help you cope with your dog’s seizures.  I understand your pain when you see your dog experience his seizure and how difficult it may be for you to find a satisfactory solution.

Dog Seizures Submissions to Dog Health News

You may already know that all dog breeds can suffer from seizures at an early age. Statistics show idiopathic seizures could occur in 6% of dogs.

This means you need to know what you should do for your dog so you don’t panic or cause harm to your dog during his seizure if he shows symptoms like: convulsions, excessive panting and vomiting.

The dog parent seizure submissions below illustrate why it’s so important for you to now notice changes in your dog’s behavior, muscle strength and energy level.  Your dog may need to have blood work and x-rays, take prescription drugs and require continual care which could lead to high dog health expenses. 

Dog SeizuresDog health insurance may help you cover some of your medical expenses.

Now, Phenobarbital and Zonisamide are epileptic drugs used as anticonvulsants.  However, your dog may experience side effects from these drugs like: ataxia, anxiety, weight gain and loss of muscle control. 

Check with your veterinarian for all the details related to your dog’s specific condition before you give your dog these drugs.

Kimberly’s Dog Seizures Submission

“My 3 year old Chihuahua suddenly developed weakness, stiffening of the neck and back and yelping as if in pain. I would hold him until he was comfortable, and he would stop crying. This left him extremely tired. 

We took him to the vet and was told he is having epileptic seizures. The blood work showed nothing .

It did appear that it was some sort of episode.  After being on Phenobarbital for 3 long weeks he is still doing all the same things. 

Finally we took him to an emergency clinic, and they did full x-rays, and showed us a tiny separation in his neck vertebrae. He is now on muscle relaxers and pain meds. 

He seems to be much better until during the night he had another episode.”

Kristina’s Dog Seizures Submission

“I have an 11 month old Siberian Husky that has short seizures very frequently.

The seizures began 3 days after he was neutered when he was 7 months old. 

He vomits and then immediately has a 30-40 second seizure. The first vet prescribed Phenobarbital twice per day after a standard blood, urine, and fecal analysis.  Diagnosis: Epilepsy. 

The longest he would go without a seizure was 2 weeks. 

The second vet tested his blood extensively and tested for a liver shunt.  All is normal except that his red blood cells are smaller than normal.  Diagnosis: Epilepsy. 

They prescribed Zonisamide. He went 2 1/2 weeks without a seizure on both medicines. 

Now we are trying to ween him off of the Phenobarbital and he has seizures every week and a half. The second vet suggests we play it by ear at this point. 

He may have to take both medicines, but we don’t want him to die of liver failure at a young age because of it.

The only other option is an MRI and spinal tap which costs well beyond what we can afford right now.

My question is even if we have an MRI and find out he has some other neurological problem, is there really any other medications that will change his status?

I know there are other anti-seizure medications, but is there really going to be a light at the end of this?

Did the anesthesia from his neutering cause this?  Every time he vomits, even if he just ate some grass because his belly didn’t feel good, he has a seizure. 

At first we thought seizures were his trauma reaction from eating things he shouldn’t have like plastic or pieces of a toy.  He’s so young and I don’t want to lose him to a grand mal.”

4 Dog Seizures Management Tips

  1. Prevention – Eliminate salty treats or food that contain potassium bromide which may lead to your dog’s seizures.
  2. Medication – Be careful about administering medication to control your dog’s epileptic seizures.  Any disruption in dosage may aggravate or initiate seizures.
  3. Diet – Medications for seizure control can cause weight gain so you may want to ask your veterinarian to help you with a diet plan for your dog.
  4. Herbal Remedy – You can use Turmeric, a powerful pain reliever and anti-inflammatory herb to help with your dog’s Dog Seizuresepilepsy.  Daily dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your dog’s weight and not exceed 2 teaspoons for dogs over 100 pounds.

This news story gave you first-hand accounts surrounding dog seizures so you’re aware of the symptoms related to epileptic seizures and specific questions you can ask your veterinarian. 

I want you to know that dog seizures are almost never fatal.  Your goal should be to reduce the frequency of your dog’s epileptic episodes so you minimize your dog’s suffering and manage his condition.

You can also submit your dog seizure experience and your solutions in the comment section below.

Share this article with other people you know who face challenges with their dog’s epileptic seizures.

I hope you received value from this article today.  I’d love to hear your feedback.  Leave your comments with your thoughts or questions.  Also, you can click on the social media links below to share this article… Thank you!

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Dog Daycare: What’s Your Plan If You Have an Emergency?

Dog daycare may not be on your top priority list until your 85 year old uncle falls down the stairs, spends 4 days in the hospital, requires 3 weeks of physical therapy and needs to install a stairlift before he can go home and care for his dog who’s now your responsibility or even worse, you’re franticly in need of someone to foster your uncle’s 10 year old dog for several weeks and have no idea how your uncle and his dog will deal with  separation.

This news brief gives you an example of one dog owner’s emergency situation so you’ll have a strategy to create a care team for an injured dog owner and their beloved dog.

Dog Daycare: 8 Helpful Tips for Emergency Coverage

  1. Dog Foster Care – You never know when you’ll need a trustworthy dog sitter who can take over full responsibility for your loved one’s dog in an emergency.  A good strategy would be to have a dog sitter and a foster home in case you need a temporary or permanent solution to care for a senior’s dog when something goes wrong.
  2. Keys – You’ll need at least 5 sets of keys to give out to your care team to handle things like taking out trash, picking up mail or retrieving personal items for your loved one.  You may need to give keys to your dog daycare manager, housekeeper or a service company if work needs to be done.
  3. Phone numbers – Emergency numbers including dog sitters, family members, friends, doctors, home care facilities and financial planners should be kept in a safe place that the care team can access readily.
  4. Dog food & treats – Your care team needs to know where the dog food and treats are kept as well as the daily portions.  You may want to put notes on the refrigerator for easy reference.
  5. Leashes, harnesses and jackets – To make things easy, keep the dog’s leashes, harnesses and jackets in one place near the door you’ll use to take the dog out.  Don’t forget the doggie waste bags too!  You may want to have an emergency kit ready in case you need to bring it along to your dog daycare facility so your senior’s dog will have all the things he needs including one of his toys.
  6. Medications – It’s critical to know all the medications taken by your senior and their dog.  You can keep a list of these items in the kitchen on the refrigerator  with instructions for dosage and where to renew prescriptions as needed.
  7. Veterinarian – Another much needed item on your checklist is the contact information for your senior’s veterinarian including the number for your local emergency animal hospital.
  8. Instructions for dog care – Your senior might have special daily routines with his dog.  A smart idea is to write them down and give them to your care team, dog daycare facility or foster dog parents so everyone has the same instructions for dog care. 

Fred and Sasha’s Story

  • Fred – The good news here is that Fred had a care team in place and were able to put a plan together immediately. Since Fred managed to dial 911 to get emergency help for himself, the next top priority was finding a foster home for his dog, Sasha, a lively 10 year old Cairn Terrier who looks like Toto from the well known classic movie, The Wizard of Oz.  After a long discussion with his care team including what to do about dog daycare, of High Energy Dogscourse, Fred agreed to the installation of a stairlift as the first step to safe-proofing his home.  Fred can’t wait to come home from from the rehab facility so he can be reunited with his best pal Sasha.  He’s grateful for his care team beyond words.
  • Sasha – As part of Fred’s care team, I’m lucky to be able to take Sasha for weekly walks by the ocean.  Even though I know Sasha could literally lift me off my feet if I let her pull me down the street, she is a perfect example of a well behaved dog.  Fred says that Sasha loves anyone she’s with, however I’m certain her heart remains with her owner and I bet she can’t wait to come home soon and be with Fred.  Dog daycare in Sasha’s case would be only for emergencies.

This short story gives you a heartwarming story and tips for emergency coverage so you can put together a care team for your loved one and their dog in case something unforeseen happens.

Share this article with friends and family so they’ll have information they may need to care for their loved one who owns a dog in case of an emergency.

By the way… claim your FREE “How NOT to Overpay to Keep Your Dog Well” video news.  Just go HERE now to get your Dog Health and Wellness Video News.

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Chubby Dogs: 7 Ways Your Plump Pooch May Cost You More

Chubby DogsChubby dogs may be the cutest canines on your street, get lots of love and make everyone smile, however their extra pounds can be the cause of dozens of health issues that will make these overweight dogs suffer and rack up expensive medical bills at your vet.  It’s hard to say no when your dog begs for treats until one day you notice he’s twice the size he was last year and your veterinarian tells you to cut back on his food because your dog could develop diabetes or a heart condition that will add lifelong dog health expenses and potentially shorten your dog’s life.

This news brief gives you 7 ways your pudgy dog could cost you more in health expenses so you’ll understand the consequences of canine obesity.

7 Ways Chubby Dogs are in Danger of Expensive Health Risks

  1. Knees  – Extra weight can put your dog at risk for knee and leg injuries and your dog may need cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) surgery.  The average cost for CCL surgery is $3,500 without dog health insurance coverage.  Additional costs are for physical therapy that can run as high as $100 per visit as needed.
  2. Arthritis – Inflammation around your dog’s joints builds up with more pounds to carry around and your dog may develop a limp or become lame from the pain he suffers with arthritis.  You may need to spend $1,000 or more to treat your dog’s arthritis, provide a dog wheelchair and pay for medicine to reduce your dog’s pain and arthritic symptoms.
  3. Hygiene – Urinary tract infections (UTI’s) increase when chubby dogs can’t reach areas to clean because of their body weight.  The cost to treat UTI’s can be more than $500 each time your dog gets an infection.
  4. Back – If your dog carries 5-10 pounds over his healthy weight Chubby Dogsthere’s a good chance he’ll have back problems sooner or later.  Corgis, Dachshunds and Basset Hounds are prone to intervertebral disc disease (IDD) which can result in surgery that can be more than $2,000.  However, back problems are common in all breeds when your dog is overweight.
  5. Cancer – Obesity in dogs can often be one cause of cancerous tumors.  The cost for tests and treatment for your dog with cancer is over $2,000.  Medical expenses can be a minor point for your family compared to what your dog must endure with this disease.
  6. Stomach – Too many treats, large portions of food and reduced exercise can contribute to your dog’s weight gain. The consequences for chubby dogs can be things like an upset tummy, gas, diarrhea, liver disease, vomiting and dehydration.  The cost for vet visits to solve these health problems add up over the years.  Stomach-related health issues are one of the most common reason for vet visits and thousands of dog owners are unpleasantly surprised with average bills of $500 – $1,000.
  7. Diabetes – Table scraps, pieces of pizza, bites of cookies and treats loaded with carbohydrates and fat could be the catalyst for your dog to develop diabetes.  If your dog suffers from diabetes, you are faced with daily responsibility for his health and additional dog health expenses throughout your dog’s life.  The estimated annual cost starts at $1,000 to cover vet visits and blood sugar maintenance.

Tips to Prevent Canine Obesity

  • Exercise – Light to moderate exercise for at least 30 minutes a Chubby Dogsday helps keep your healthy dog from growing into the obese weight category of chubby dogs.
  • Diet – Work with your vet so you feed your dog a breed specific nutritionally balanced diet with limited treats for being a good dog.
  • Habits – Bad habits are hard to break, however your dog depends on your help to keep him at his healthy weight.  It’s never too late to change your habits like limiting treats to once a day.  Obesity can shorten your dog’s life, reduce his quality of life and even worse, you may face tough decisions when presented with a big bill to pay because your dog is overweight.

This article gives you reasons to keep your dog at his healthy weight to prevent him from the risks of obesity including extra expenses to care for a chubby dog.

Share this article with your friends and family so they have information on the dangers faced by overweight dogs and the costs to cover their health expenses.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like breaking news on how to NOT overpay for your dog’s healthcare costs and reduce the number of times your dog gets sick, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

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Small High Energy Dogs: Who’s in Control of Your Leash?

High Energy DogsHigh energy dogs could knock you over, push you down or even worse, your darling dog could drag you down the street and land you in your local hospital emergency room.  Like thousands of dog owners, you could end up with a rotator cuff injury, a twisted ankle and multiple bruises unless you know how to handle your dog’s energy without putting both of you at risk when you’re out on your daily walks.

This news brief gives you 5 essential tips to manage your dog’s power in ways that will keep you on your feet and give your dog her freedom.

High Energy Dogs – What To Watch Out For

  • Leash – Your 35 pound leashed dog could take you for a walk and might actually pull so hard that you can’t keep your balance. If you have limited strength in your arms and legs, you may want to hire a stronger individual to walk your dog.  The cost for someone to walk your dog will be far less than the expense, pain and inconvenience of being injured in a fall.
  • People – Your lively dog may be a bit too much for other people to handle unless they have experience with sprightly dogs. One way to prevent accidents is to keep your dog on a leash and have her sit when other people approach to encourage good dog behavior.
  • DogsHigh energy dogs tend to be social with other dogs which means they often want to run towards other dogs to sniff them out.  A quick jolt on a leash can catch you by surprise, so the best strategy is to stay focused and have the proper type of collar and harness for your dog.

5 Tips to Harness Your Dog’s Power

  1. Speed – Keep your pace slow and train your dog to walk without pulling at her leash.  Your dog may be in jeopardy when she’s allowed to go too fast if she causes you to lose your balance and fall in the street.
  2. Location – Walk high energy dogs on streets and paths that are flat so you’re not in danger of bumpy surfaces, holes or hills.  Choose a route to walk your dog that keeps you close to your home in case of an emergency.
  3. Weather – Wind, ice and snow can add more challenges with your lively dog.  If your dog’s been cooped up indoors and suddenly has the freedom to be outdoors, she might want to leap out the door and jump for joy, pulling you down the stairs at the High Energy Dogssame time.  Weather challenges like gusts of wind, slippery surfaces and deep snow could mean trouble if high energy dogs move too quickly and you take a spin.  You can set up a place for your dog to relieve herself in your home or backyard in bad weather or hire someone to walk your dog in inclement weather.
  4. Health – You and your dog’s health are important.  That’s why it’s critical to understand your physical limitations as a dog owner with a small perky dog who needs more exercise than some of the larger dog breeds.  People who have heart conditions, arthritis and poor balance need to evaluate their physical strength before taking on an active dog with high energy.
  5. Help – When you realize your little dog isn’t enjoying the outdoors enough because you’re nervous about the risks of her high energy level, the best choice is to hire a dog walker you can trust with your dog.

Small High Energy Dogs

  • Breeds – Australian Terrier, Border Terrier, Boston Terrier, Cairn Terrier, Fox Terrier, & Jack Russell Terrier.  Farmers used many of these dog breeds to hunt snakes and rodents and assist in fox hunts
  • Characteristics –  Terriers are full of spunk and tenacious, independent, courageous and clever.  These lively dogs thrive on High Energy Dogsmental and physical stimulation for relaxation. Activities like playing frisbee, running and hiking are perfect to help slow down your overactive dog.
  • Personality – Terriers are smart, good-natured and affectionate which makes them a very popular breed.

Special Note:  Sasha, the Cairn Terrier dog, featured in this article is one of the top 10 small high energy dogs and comes from The Isle of Skye in Scotland.  I’ve been fortunate enough to take Sasha for a few walks and it’s exhilarating to feel like we could take flight if only I could run like the wind with this precious dog.

This article gives you tips on how to deal with small dog breeds with extraordinary energy levels so you can enjoy your relationship with your dog safely.

Share this news brief with your friends and family with small active dogs so they have the information they need for their safety.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Puppy Bowl Safety: What Germs Are in Your Dog’s Water?

If your puppy bowl makes you sick to your stomach when you think of taking a sip of water out of it, then it’s definitely time to empty the water, wash your dog’s dish and refill it with fresh clean water before your dog drinks dirty water from his slimy bowl that could harbor bacteria which might result in your dog’s intestinal infection or even worse, your dog could end up with diarrhea that could have been prevented with clean water in his bowl.

This news brief gives you reasons to wash your dog’s water bowl daily and keep his water free from germs and bacteria that could make your dog sick.

3 Puppy Bowl Germs to Watch Out For

  1. Fecal Contamination – Intestinal germs like parvovirus and roundworms are transmitted through fecal to oral methods.  Coccidia is a parasite found in your dog’s fecal waste that can cause watery diarrhea. If your dog picks up a parvovirus in the street on his tongue, the bacteria could find it’s way to his water bowl.
  2. Oral – Canine papilloma virus may spread through your dog’s saliva if he’s come in contact with a dog carrying the virus. Symptoms are small warts or benign tumors that develop on your dog’s tongue, lips, gums or in his throat.  If you have more than one dog in your home sharing a water dish, this is yet another reason to wash your puppy bowl every day.
  3. Standing water – Giardia, a common parasite found in feces, can survive in standing water and may result in diarrhea, vomiting and weight loss. 

Note: Your dog’s water and food bowls are affected by heat and cold.  Keep your dog’s outdoor water bowl in the shade. Bring the bowl inside and wash it at the end of the day.

Dog Health Warning: Communal Bowls

  • Dogs often eat, lick or step in fecal waste.  There’s a chance these germs and bacteria can find their way into communal water bowls.
  • Respiratory diseases like kennel cough and canine influenza are spread through sneezing and coughing. These germs can lurk in water bowls after dogs sneeze or cough nearby.

Tips to Keep your Dog’s Water Dish Clean

  • Dog Dish Material – One of the safest materials for your dog’s water and food dish is stainless steel because it’s nonporous, dishwasher safe, unbreakable and lasts a long time.  Look for a stainless steel bowl with non-skid rubber on the bottom.
  • Daily Puppy Bowl Cleaning – Wash your puppy’s bowls in the morning before his first meal.  You can get your whole family to make a commitment to wash and replenish your dog’s water bowl daily.

This short news article helps you understand the importance of keeping your dog’s water bowl clean so you can prevent him from health risks like viruses, infections and diarrhea. 

Share this article with your friends and family so they know why they need to wash their dog’s water dish to keep their dog healthy.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like easy to follow news briefs to Get a Handle On Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs, claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

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Social Anxiety in Dogs: Can Dog Parents Be The Cause?

AnxietySocial anxiety observed in dogs could be rooted in specific breed characteristics, illnesses or abusive treatment which triggers fear or aggression, however your dog’s physical and emotional environment can have the most profound consequential effect on your dog’s behavior, and at the same time it leads you to wonder if dog parents who suffer from day to day stress play a prominent part in the upswing of nervousness in dogs. 

This news brief gives you tips to reduce your dog’s angst which may help you change your own behavior and result in a lower level of anxious behavior in your dog, your life and your household.

Social Anxiety in Dogs: 3 Simple Tips to Keep Your Dog Calm

  1. Energy – Your dog might pick up agitated energy in your home when he’s faced with too much commotion, raised voices, and electronic devices that beep, buzz or vibrate.  If your dog seems hyperactive or can’t stay still for very long, you may want to monitor noises and activity levels in your home for an hour.  You can turn off your phone, slow down your pace and put on some quiet music to see if your dog’s behavior changes.  Because your dog hears extremely well, you may want to use a softer voice and cut back on loud commands to see if your dog’s behavior becomes more relaxed.
  2. Exercise – Lack of exercise can have an impact on your dog’s social anxiety.  Dogs need to release stress and burn off calories Anxietyjust like you do, so your dog’s tension could be the result of pent up zest that needs to be released.  You can increase the number of times you walk your dog and find ways to add activities indoors to allow your dog to move around as much as possible.  This change of pace might help loosen up your dog and quiet him down.
  3. Food – Your dog may be hyperactive because there’s too much sugar in his diet.  Some manufactured dog foods are high in carbohydrates which turn to sugar in your dog’s body.  Check with your veterinarian and be sure your dog gets a breed specific nutritionally balanced diet that won’t contribute to a sugar high.

Herbal Solutions to Increase Calmness in Dogs

Since most people probably won’t change their behavior, even if they may be the cause of their dog’s social anxiety, here’s 2 herbal solutions you can try:

  • Essential Oils – Lavender or lemon essential oil can be placed in the room where your dog sleeps using a diffuser that is out of your dog’s reach.  Allow the calming aroma to work and keep track of your dog’s behavior.
  • Chamomile – Add a cool cup of chamomile tea to your dog’s food or water.  Chamomile has a soothing effect and may quiet down your anxious dog.

AnxietyYou can comment on the blog after you try these herbs so people can benefit from the efficacy of herbal remedies for social anxiety in dogs.  If you’d like to know more about how herbal solutions can help your dog’s apprehension, feel free to ask your question on the blog.

This news brief gives you tips to help reduce your dog’s anxious behavior which may positively affect your dog and your entire family.

Share this article with your friends and family so they can use these tips to keep their dog from uneasiness in social settings.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

Hope you took some great value out of this post today! I’d love to hear your feedback, so make sure you leave a comment with your thoughts or questions. Also, you can click on the social media links below to share this article… Thank you!

By the way… claim your FREE “How NOT to Overpay to Keep Your Dog Well” video news.  Just go HERE now to get your Dog Health and Wellness Video News.

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Dog Sitting: Dogs I’ve Loved and Left Around the World

Dog SittingDog sitting services require experienced people who take over responsibility for your dog along with an understanding that with someone else’s dog, sooner or later they have to wave goodbye to their new four legged friend even if it breaks their heart and your dog, who doesn’t know why they’ve been deserted, may go through an extended period of separation anxiety after your dog sitter is long gone.

Thanks to guest blogger, world traveler and author, Gabrielle Yetter, this news brief gives you a description of what its like to care for other people’s dogs when you know you have to leave them at some point.

A Dog Sitting Journey told by Gabi Yetter

Our first was Noisette, the chocolate Labrador who loved to hike in France. Then came Bengy, a feisty spaniel who leaped four feet onto stone walls in the Italian countryside. Lulu was a nervous little terrier who wanted Parmesan cheese sprinkled on her food and Fritz was an enormous Belgian Malinois who guarded the ecolodge in Nicaragua with a ferocious attitude, sprinting after anything that threatened his space.

House-sitting for other people’s dogs is rather like having grand-children – or so they say. You love every minute you spend with them then hand them back when you’re done. Thing is, with most of the dogs we’ve had on our dog sitting travels, we don’t want to hand them back at all.

Our house-sitting adventures began after we quit our jobs, sold our home and moved to Cambodia in 2010. After almost four years, we decided to spread our wings and spend time in new parts of the world. Staying in other people’s homes. Taking care of other people’s pets.

Dog SittingI’d grown up in a houseful of dogs and cats, Skip is an avid animal-lover and in Cambodia our landlord didn’t allow pets. So, for us, living with other people’s animals was a special treat.

We signed up with a house-sitting site, contacted places that appealed to us and jumped in.

As to be expected, along with the pleasure of animal companionship and dog sitting comes responsibility. In France, we had to take Noisette to the vet when she got a stick in her eye, and in England we hauled Rufus, a 120 pound Golden Retriever into a taxi to go to the animal hospital when he seemed unwell. While out running in the countryside in Italy, I needed to carry Betty (a Maltese poodle) when she was being pursued by another dog and, in Florence, during a dramatic Easter firework display, I had to huddle in a corner of the street to console a terrified Lulu. Fritz scared the daylights out of us one day when he sprinted down a path on the volcano in pursuit of a creature in the jungle. We never learned what he found but he returned to the lodge with blood on his paw and a victorious look on his face.

Dog SittingDog sitting in France, we cared for two skittish rescue dogs whose owners roasted and froze 72 chicken legs for us to feed them while they were away. In England, Brownie the Springer Spaniel chewed up a doctor’s receipt, making it impossible for us to get reimbursed by insurance. And last Christmas, one of the five Chihuahuas we were tending nipped Skip on the leg when we first met.

Although once was enough for the Chihuahuas and the French rescue dogs, we often fall in love with our surrogate dogs and it’s always hard to say goodbye.

We have our list of dog sitting favourites and it’s getting longer: Rufus, the soppy slobbery Golden, who leaps enthusiastically into ponds and rivers, dragging five feet-long tree trunks in his jaw then shaking himself all over us; Bolle the enormous Mastiff who weighs more than I do and is a huge soppy bundle of love; Betty the Maltese who is a powder puff of fluffy happiness; Bengy the spaniel who ran with us in the countryside then slept on our bed; Alli the Ridgeback in Nicaragua who was as loving as she was large; Meg and Nelly, the elderly Labradors in Portugal who slowly meandered along dirt roads as they were losing their eyesight.

And while we’ve now been dog sitting and house-sitting for more than three years and have doggy pals scattered all over the world, I’m pretty confident there are many more Bettys, Allis, Nellys and Bengys in our future.

Dog SittingGabi Yetter, guest blogger, is a lover of dogs and all animals, an author, a foodie and a traveler.  Photos in this article feature Gabi and Skip Yetter with their doggy pals.

This news story gives you Gabi’s account of taking care of other people’s dogs while traveling around the world.

Share this article with your friends and family so they have the information needed about dog sitting.  You can always depend of the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Dementia in Dogs: What If Your Dog Forgets Who You Are?

Dog Health News™ - Dementia in DogsSigns of dementia in dogs, also diagnosed as canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD), appear in ways that might go unnoticed or could be misdiagnosed when your dog has accidents in your house or she doesn’t respond to your commands until you repeat yourself several times, and even worse, your dog may wander aimlessly and not recognize you any more, which could frustrate you enough to wonder if your dog should be put down to save her from further decline and reduced quality of life.

This news brief gives you facts about canine dementia including symptoms, possible causes and treatment so you can take better care of your senior dog who actually needs more love and understanding than when she was a puppy.

Dementia in Dogs: 10 Potential Symptoms

  1. Confused – Your dog may seem disoriented and she could also wander around aimlessly in your home or outdoors.  When you look in your dog’s eyes, you may not feel she’s connecting with you the way she did when she was younger.
  2. Anxious  – Your dog’s behavior could change and she might seem nervous, shaky or ill at ease.  You may also notice your dog barks and whimpers at the smallest distractions or changes in her environment.
  3. Lack of appetite  – Your dog may not be interested in her meals and walk away from her food.  If you offer your dog treats, she may ignore them or seem confused.
  4. Sleeplessness – Symptoms of dementia in dogs can also cause your dog to have difficulty sleeping, wander around, whine and seem uncomfortable during the night.
  5. Forgetful – You may need to guide your dog on walks because she Dementia in Dogsmight not remember the route and seem anxious.  Your dog may also require your help to find toys, her water bowl and her favorite place to take a nap.
  6. Less self-grooming – Watch for a decline in self-grooming like licking private parts and paws.  This lack of personal care could be a sign of dementia in dogs.
  7. Incontinence – Senior dogs with dementia may develop incontinence because the messages sent by their brain no longer work well and they can’t control when they urinate or move their bowels.
  8. Less playful – A decline in energy along with a lack of playfulness may be yet another sign of dementia in your dog as she ages.
  9. Irritable – Your dog may have signs of dementia if she’s easily disturbed, nervous or jumpy.
  10. Slow learner – Another subtle sign of dementia could be if your dog doesn’t pick up new clues when you show her how to do something like getting into your car or fetching a toy.

Possible Causes of Cognitive Disfunction and Dementia in Dogs

  • Genetic predisposition to cognitive disfunction.
  • Oxidative stress related to free radical damage to your dog’s brain.
  • Nerve damage from protein build up that blocks signals from your dog’s brain.

Prevention and Treatment

  • Diet – Feed your dog a balanced breed-appropriate diet and keep treats to a minimum so your dog maintains a healthy weight.  Overweight dogs are at higher risk for diseases including dementia.
  • Exercise – Keep your dog active and useful with toys and long walks every day.  The more your dog uses her brain, the better Jesse - Dog Health News - Dementia in Dogschance she will retain her memory and live a longer, healthier life.  Stimulating toys that challenge your dog to think are the best ones to use for your dog at any age.
  • Remedies – Add alpha lipoic acid and grape seed extract as remedies to prevent and treat dementia in dogs.
  • Unconditional love – Be sure to spend time with your senior dog and give her extra care, attention and company.  Your dog is affected by her environment, so positive energy can go a long way to help your senior dog have a better quality of life.
  • Vet visits – Bring your dog to your local vet twice a year for checkups to monitor her progression of symptoms.

This short article covered symptoms causes, prevention and treatment for dogs with dementia so you have the tools you need to keep your dog healthy. 

Share this news brief with your friends and family so they have information on dementia in dogs to help them with their senior dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Dog Head Tilt: What’s Right or Wrong About This Habit?

Dog Head TiltDog head tilt normally looks like your dog wants to express herself or she wants to get your attention, however when your dog tilts her head too often, loses her balance and has strange eye movements, you need to bring your dog to your veterinarian immediately for a checkup to see if your dog has underlying health problems that could affect her central nervous system.

This news brief gives you signs to watch for when your dog tilts her head so you know when to take action before your dog’s health is at risk from Ataxia which results in loss of coordination of your dog’s limbs, trunk and head.

Dog Head Tilt: 7 Signs of Ataxia

  1. Tilting head – Your dog may start to have abnormal behavior and tilt her head to one side.  She might have a loss of balance or have vertigo and feel dizzy.  Unusual head movements could indicate nerve damage and discomfort in your dog’s head and neck area.
  2. Hearing loss – Your dog may not react to your vocal commands as quickly as usual and you might realize you have to raise your voice higher to get her attention.
  3. Weak limbs – Your dog may start to favor one leg more than another or have noticeable weakness in one or more limbs.  Even without signs of dog head tilt, your dog might have difficulty on stairs, walking or jumping because her limbs are not strong enough to hold her weight.  In the worst cases, your dog won’t be able to hold her legs up at all.
  4. Stumbling – Although puppies fall over easily, your healthy adult dog should stand up straight on all four legs and have excellent balance.  Bring your dog to your vet if your dog continuously falls over, sways or stumbles.
  5. Drowsiness – If your dog is excessively tired or seems unfocused, she may have health issues related to her head, nerves and brain area with no instances of dog head tilt.  An active dog may get tired, however it’s not normal for your dog to have a low energy level and act like she’s in a stupor.
  6. Appetite loss – Your dog may suffer from motion sickness if she has vertigo or balance problems which can result in nausea and a lack of appetite.
  7. Behavior change – Take your dog to your local veterinarian if your dog’s energy level changes or she shows abnormal behavior.

Cricket Ditty – Challenges and Solutions for Dogs with Ataxia

Dog Head TiltMargaret Ditty discovered her dog Cricket had Ataxia when her 7 year old Chihuahua started losing her balance, falling over and exhibiting moments of exaggerated dog head tilt.  Cricket has Granulomatous Meningoencephalitis (GME) as a result of a vaccination at age 7.  You can learn more about GME from Margaret’s stories on her site, Pet Parents Fighting GME.

These 2 videos show Cricket struggling to stand up on a wood floor and Cricket walking down the hall with her custom designed wheelchair.

3 Types of Ataxia

  1. Sensory – Your dog’s spinal cord becomes compressed gradually.  Symptoms to watch for are when your dog misplaces her feet and her limbs become weak.  This condition can start with cerebral lesions in your dog’s brain near her neck.
  2. Vestibulocochlear – Damage to this nerve in your dog’s inner ear can cause hearing problems, dog head tilt and change your dog’s head and neck position.  Your dog may tend to lean over, tip over and even roll over.
  3. Cerebellar – Your dog may have uncoordinated movement, head tremors and swaying of her body. 

Causes of Ataxia

  • Spinal cord – Your dog’s ataxia may be caused by things like degeneration of nerves, loss of blood from a blood clot, malformation, cancer, as spinal cyst, infections or a trauma to her spinal cord.
  • Metabolic – Your dog may be anemic or have low blood sugar and low potassium levels.
  • Neurologic – Your dog may contract an inflammatory anti-immune disease to her central nervous system.
  • Vestibular – Your dog may get a fungal infection in her middle ear which can affect her peripheral nervous system and lead to dog head tilt.

Diagnosis of Ataxia Symptoms

  • Health history – Whenever your dog shows abnormal behavior, it’s critical to keep a journal so you can give your veterinarian a clear, step by step description of your dog’s illness with actual dates when symptoms were noticed.
  • Tests – Your veterinarian may order tests including blood counts, urinalysis, MRI and X-rays to determine if your dog has cancer.  Your dog may need an ultrasound to check her pancreas, liver and kidney function.
  • Expenses – 
  • If you have dog health insurance, some of your expenses may be covered, however you can expect initial bills to add up to over $3,000 if your dog has Ataxia.

Treatment for Your Dog with Ataxia and Dog Head Tilt

  • Drugs –  Consult with your veterinarian about drugs to treat your dog with Ataxia if your dog experiences pain from inflammation.  Ask your vet about alternative medicines and all potential side effects.
  • Exercise – Your dog’s motor skills may be limited and you might need to make changes in your home to help your dog from sliding on slippery floors. 
  • Products – Look into products that might help your dog grip the floor better or dog wheelchairs that allow your dog more mobility.

This news brief gives you information about symptoms, causes, diagnosis and treatment of Ataxia so you can take better care of your dog.  Much thanks to Margaret Ditty and Cricket for the work they are doing to help dog parents.  Awareness of signs of diseases can make a huge difference because you’ll know when to bring your dog to your local vet or emergency animal hospital if needed.

Share this article with your friends and family so they can watch for signs of abnormal or excessive dog head tilt in their dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

By the way… claim your FREE “How NOT to Overpay to Keep Your Dog Well” video news.  Just go HERE now to get your Dog Health and Wellness Video News.

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