Dog Scooting: 3 Messy Reasons Your Dog Drags His Bottom

Dog ScootingDog scooting may destroy your carpet and embarrass you when your dog drags his bottom on your carpet in front of your friends and the longer you wait to look at your dog’s messy private parts to see what’s wrong the worse his condition could get which might lead to months of vet visits, expensive treatments or surgery to repair your dog’s anal sacs or stitch up his rectal prolapse.

This health article gives you causes of infections and inflammation which could lead to your dog’s habit of dragging his bottom to relieve his pain.  I hope when you read this article it will give you information to help you with your dog’s condition.

5 Causes that Lead to Dog Scooting

  1. Anal sac problems – Your dog may have smelly fatty substances that drip out of his anal sacs inside your dog’s anus.  These sacs can become abscessed, blocked and inflamed which can cause your dog pain.  Your dog may temporarily relieve his pain by scooting on the ground.  Smaller breeds like Cairn Terrier, Chihuahua, Lhasa  Apso, Toy Poodle, Beagle, Basset Hound and Cocker Spaniel are prone to anal sac problems.   Other signs of anal sac problems can be when your dog chews and licks around his anus.  Dog scooting can also occur when your dog has trouble defecating.   
  2. Fecal contaminationDiarrhea can leave your dog weak, dehydrated and a yucky, matted bottom.  This leftover fecal material can be uncomfortable which makes your dog scoot on your carpet, grass or ground to get rid of it.
  3. Worms – Tapeworms are another reason your dog may start scooting. Your dog could get tapeworms if he swallows worm-infested fleas.  A sign your dog has worms is if you see very small rice-like tapeworm segments around your dog’s anus.
  4. Rectal prolapse – Rectal prolapse refers to the final portion of your dog’s large intestine which protrudes through his anus.  Your dog can develop a rectal prolapse after severe diarrhea or if he strains with constipation which can lead to dog scooting. Take your dog to your vet immediately if you see a stretched out circular mass that sticks out from your dog’s bottom.
  5. Wounds and tumors – Your dog may have a minor cut, splinter or tumor in his anus which can cause him to drag his bottom to get relief.  The most obvious symptom is redness or a discharge around your dog’s anus.

How to Check Your Dog’s Bottom for Health Problems

The only tool you need are rubber gloves to keep your hands clean.  Use these tips to check your dog’s bottom if he’s scooting on your carpet, grass and ground.

  • Visual inspection – Put on a pair of rubber gloves and lift up your dog’s tail. Your dog’s anus and the hair around it should be clean, without a yucky smell. Look for swelling, growths,Dog Scooting discharge, or injury.  Bring your dog to your groomer or your vet to help prevent dog scooting when your dog’s anal area is not clean or has a bad odor.
  • Anal sac problems – Powerful, foul odors around your dog’s bottom indicates an abscess or infection. Bring your dog to your vet immediately to get treatment for your dog’s anal sac problems.
  • Worms – Tapeworm segments look like tiny, wiggly, white worms or small pieces of rice. Bring your dog to your vet immediately If you see either of these signs around your dog’s anus.

Treatments for your Dog’s Scooting Problems

  1. Anal sac problems:  Bring your dog to your vet or groomer to get help to express your dog’s anal sacs with warm compresses.  Your vet may prescribe antibiotics and suggest you increase fiber in your dog’s diet to stop dog scooting behavior.  Your dog’s blocked and inflamed anal sacs may need to be lanced or flushed under general anesthesia.
  2. Fecal contamination: Treatment can be as simple as cleaning your dog’s anal area with a facecloth soaked in warm water.  After you wash your dog’s bottom you can cut away his dirty hair. Be careful you don’t cut your dog’s skin to prevent another wound that could get infected.  You may need to bring your dog to your vet if your dog suffers from diarrhea or constipation to help prevent this problem.
  3. Worms: You can easily treat your dog for tapeworms with a simple dose of oral or injectable medication.  To prevent tapeworms that results in dog scooting behavior you’ll need to keep your dog away from fleas.  Your vet can give you options for safe flea control.  You can add a pinch of garlic powder to your dog’s food or give your dog garlic oil in a capsule as an herbal remedy to help repel fleas.
  4. Rectal prolapse:  Your vet may need to partially stitch up your dog’s anus to prevent his prolapse from recurring.  You may change your dog’s diet to moist food or use stool softeners to reduce your dog from straining due to constipation.  Your dog may need surgery to fully repair his rectal prolapse.

Dog ScootingNow you know about the causes and treatments for your dog’s scooting behavior.  I hope you will check your dog’s bottom even if it’s yucky or smelly so you can stay on top of your dog’s health. 

Share this health article with your friends and family so they know about the causes of dog scooting problems and how to treat their dog when they see signs of things like fecal contamination, tumors or rectal prolapse.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like breaking news on how to NOT overpay for your dog’s healthcare costs and reduce the number of times your dog gets sick, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

Dementia in Dogs: What If Your Dog Forgets Who You Are?

Dog Health News™ - Dementia in DogsSigns of dementia in dogs, also diagnosed as canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD), appear in ways that might go unnoticed or could be misdiagnosed when your dog has accidents in your house or she doesn’t respond to your commands until you repeat yourself several times, and even worse, your dog may wander aimlessly and not recognize you any more, which could frustrate you enough to wonder if your dog should be put down to save her from further decline and reduced quality of life.

This news brief gives you facts about canine dementia including symptoms, possible causes and treatment so you can take better care of your senior dog who actually needs more love and understanding than when she was a puppy.

Dementia in Dogs: 10 Potential Symptoms

  1. Confused – Your dog may seem disoriented and she could also wander around aimlessly in your home or outdoors.  When you look in your dog’s eyes, you may not feel she’s connecting with you the way she did when she was younger.
  2. Anxious  – Your dog’s behavior could change and she might seem nervous, shaky or ill at ease.  You may also notice your dog barks and whimpers at the smallest distractions or changes in her environment.
  3. Lack of appetite  – Your dog may not be interested in her meals and walk away from her food.  If you offer your dog treats, she may ignore them or seem confused.
  4. Sleeplessness – Symptoms of dementia in dogs can also cause your dog to have difficulty sleeping, wander around, whine and seem uncomfortable during the night.
  5. Forgetful – You may need to guide your dog on walks because she Dementia in Dogsmight not remember the route and seem anxious.  Your dog may also require your help to find toys, her water bowl and her favorite place to take a nap.
  6. Less self-grooming – Watch for a decline in self-grooming like licking private parts and paws.  This lack of personal care could be a sign of dementia in dogs.
  7. Incontinence – Senior dogs with dementia may develop incontinence because the messages sent by their brain no longer work well and they can’t control when they urinate or move their bowels.
  8. Less playful – A decline in energy along with a lack of playfulness may be yet another sign of dementia in your dog as she ages.
  9. Irritable – Your dog may have signs of dementia if she’s easily disturbed, nervous or jumpy.
  10. Slow learner – Another subtle sign of dementia could be if your dog doesn’t pick up new clues when you show her how to do something like getting into your car or fetching a toy.

Possible Causes of Cognitive Disfunction and Dementia in Dogs

  • Genetic predisposition to cognitive disfunction.
  • Oxidative stress related to free radical damage to your dog’s brain.
  • Nerve damage from protein build up that blocks signals from your dog’s brain.

Prevention and Treatment

  • Diet – Feed your dog a balanced breed-appropriate diet and keep treats to a minimum so your dog maintains a healthy weight.  Overweight dogs are at higher risk for diseases including dementia.
  • Exercise – Keep your dog active and useful with toys and long walks every day.  The more your dog uses her brain, the better Jesse - Dog Health News - Dementia in Dogschance she will retain her memory and live a longer, healthier life.  Stimulating toys that challenge your dog to think are the best ones to use for your dog at any age.
  • Remedies – Add alpha lipoic acid and grape seed extract as remedies to prevent and treat dementia in dogs.
  • Unconditional love – Be sure to spend time with your senior dog and give her extra care, attention and company.  Your dog is affected by her environment, so positive energy can go a long way to help your senior dog have a better quality of life.
  • Vet visits – Bring your dog to your local vet twice a year for checkups to monitor her progression of symptoms.

This short article covered symptoms causes, prevention and treatment for dogs with dementia so you have the tools you need to keep your dog healthy. 

Share this news brief with your friends and family so they have information on dementia in dogs to help them with their senior dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like breaking news on how to NOT overpay for your dog’s healthcare costs and reduce the number of times your dog gets sick, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

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