Dog Seizures: Real Stories to Clarify Your Challenge

Dog Seizures

Dog seizures may start suddenly in the still of the night when you hear your dog cry and find him sprawled on the floor in a pool of his own vomit.  These short epileptic seizures can last less than a minute, however you and your dog could end up exhausted at an emergency animal clinic after several visits to more than one vet for tests and evaluations. You may be so frustrated that you wonder if there’s a light at the end of the tunnel or whether you’ll eventually lose your dog from these violent seizures.

This news story gives you 2 insightful seizure submissions sent to Dog Health News from dog owners who shared their struggle with their dogs‘ seizures. My hope is you’ll be able to glean information from their stories to help you cope with your dog’s seizures.  I understand your pain when you see your dog experience his seizure and how difficult it may be for you to find a satisfactory solution.

Dog Seizures Submissions to Dog Health News

You may already know that all dog breeds can suffer from seizures at an early age. Statistics show idiopathic seizures could occur in 6% of dogs.

This means you need to know what you should do for your dog so you don’t panic or cause harm to your dog during his seizure if he shows symptoms like: convulsions, excessive panting and vomiting.

The dog parent seizure submissions below illustrate why it’s so important for you to now notice changes in your dog’s behavior, muscle strength and energy level.  Your dog may need to have blood work and x-rays, take prescription drugs and require continual care which could lead to high dog health expenses. 

Dog SeizuresDog health insurance may help you cover some of your medical expenses.

Now, Phenobarbital and Zonisamide are epileptic drugs used as anticonvulsants.  However, your dog may experience side effects from these drugs like: ataxia, anxiety, weight gain and loss of muscle control. 

Check with your veterinarian for all the details related to your dog’s specific condition before you give your dog these drugs.

Kimberly’s Dog Seizures Submission

“My 3 year old Chihuahua suddenly developed weakness, stiffening of the neck and back and yelping as if in pain. I would hold him until he was comfortable, and he would stop crying. This left him extremely tired. 

We took him to the vet and was told he is having epileptic seizures. The blood work showed nothing .

It did appear that it was some sort of episode.  After being on Phenobarbital for 3 long weeks he is still doing all the same things. 

Finally we took him to an emergency clinic, and they did full x-rays, and showed us a tiny separation in his neck vertebrae. He is now on muscle relaxers and pain meds. 

He seems to be much better until during the night he had another episode.”

Kristina’s Dog Seizures Submission

“I have an 11 month old Siberian Husky that has short seizures very frequently.

The seizures began 3 days after he was neutered when he was 7 months old. 

He vomits and then immediately has a 30-40 second seizure. The first vet prescribed Phenobarbital twice per day after a standard blood, urine, and fecal analysis.  Diagnosis: Epilepsy. 

The longest he would go without a seizure was 2 weeks. 

The second vet tested his blood extensively and tested for a liver shunt.  All is normal except that his red blood cells are smaller than normal.  Diagnosis: Epilepsy. 

They prescribed Zonisamide. He went 2 1/2 weeks without a seizure on both medicines. 

Now we are trying to ween him off of the Phenobarbital and he has seizures every week and a half. The second vet suggests we play it by ear at this point. 

He may have to take both medicines, but we don’t want him to die of liver failure at a young age because of it.

The only other option is an MRI and spinal tap which costs well beyond what we can afford right now.

My question is even if we have an MRI and find out he has some other neurological problem, is there really any other medications that will change his status?

I know there are other anti-seizure medications, but is there really going to be a light at the end of this?

Did the anesthesia from his neutering cause this?  Every time he vomits, even if he just ate some grass because his belly didn’t feel good, he has a seizure. 

At first we thought seizures were his trauma reaction from eating things he shouldn’t have like plastic or pieces of a toy.  He’s so young and I don’t want to lose him to a grand mal.”

4 Dog Seizures Management Tips

  1. Prevention – Eliminate salty treats or food that contain potassium bromide which may lead to your dog’s seizures.
  2. Medication – Be careful about administering medication to control your dog’s epileptic seizures.  Any disruption in dosage may aggravate or initiate seizures.
  3. Diet – Medications for seizure control can cause weight gain so you may want to ask your veterinarian to help you with a diet plan for your dog.
  4. Herbal Remedy – You can use Turmeric, a powerful pain reliever and anti-inflammatory herb to help with your dog’s Dog Seizuresepilepsy.  Daily dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your dog’s weight and not exceed 2 teaspoons for dogs over 100 pounds.

This news story gave you first-hand accounts surrounding dog seizures so you’re aware of the symptoms related to epileptic seizures and specific questions you can ask your veterinarian. 

I want you to know that dog seizures are almost never fatal.  Your goal should be to reduce the frequency of your dog’s epileptic episodes so you minimize your dog’s suffering and manage his condition.

You can also submit your dog seizure experience and your solutions in the comment section below.

Share this article with other people you know who face challenges with their dog’s epileptic seizures.

I hope you received value from this article today.  I’d love to hear your feedback.  Leave your comments with your thoughts or questions.  Also, you can click on the social media links below to share this article… Thank you!

Dog insurance and cat insurance from Healthy Paws Pet Insurance. Get pet insurance reviews. Compare pet insurance plans.

Dog Head Tilt: What’s Right or Wrong About This Habit?

Dog Head TiltDog head tilt normally looks like your dog wants to express herself or she wants to get your attention, however when your dog tilts her head too often, loses her balance and has strange eye movements, you need to bring your dog to your veterinarian immediately for a checkup to see if your dog has underlying health problems that could affect her central nervous system.

This news brief gives you signs to watch for when your dog tilts her head so you know when to take action before your dog’s health is at risk from Ataxia which results in loss of coordination of your dog’s limbs, trunk and head.

Dog Head Tilt: 7 Signs of Ataxia

  1. Tilting head – Your dog may start to have abnormal behavior and tilt her head to one side.  She might have a loss of balance or have vertigo and feel dizzy.  Unusual head movements could indicate nerve damage and discomfort in your dog’s head and neck area.
  2. Hearing loss – Your dog may not react to your vocal commands as quickly as usual and you might realize you have to raise your voice higher to get her attention.
  3. Weak limbs – Your dog may start to favor one leg more than another or have noticeable weakness in one or more limbs.  Even without signs of dog head tilt, your dog might have difficulty on stairs, walking or jumping because her limbs are not strong enough to hold her weight.  In the worst cases, your dog won’t be able to hold her legs up at all.
  4. Stumbling – Although puppies fall over easily, your healthy adult dog should stand up straight on all four legs and have excellent balance.  Bring your dog to your vet if your dog continuously falls over, sways or stumbles.
  5. Drowsiness – If your dog is excessively tired or seems unfocused, she may have health issues related to her head, nerves and brain area with no instances of dog head tilt.  An active dog may get tired, however it’s not normal for your dog to have a low energy level and act like she’s in a stupor.
  6. Appetite loss – Your dog may suffer from motion sickness if she has vertigo or balance problems which can result in nausea and a lack of appetite.
  7. Behavior change – Take your dog to your local veterinarian if your dog’s energy level changes or she shows abnormal behavior.

Cricket Ditty – Challenges and Solutions for Dogs with Ataxia

Dog Head TiltMargaret Ditty discovered her dog Cricket had Ataxia when her 7 year old Chihuahua started losing her balance, falling over and exhibiting moments of exaggerated dog head tilt.  Cricket has Granulomatous Meningoencephalitis (GME) as a result of a vaccination at age 7.  You can learn more about GME from Margaret’s stories on her site, Pet Parents Fighting GME.

These 2 videos show Cricket struggling to stand up on a wood floor and Cricket walking down the hall with her custom designed wheelchair.

3 Types of Ataxia

  1. Sensory – Your dog’s spinal cord becomes compressed gradually.  Symptoms to watch for are when your dog misplaces her feet and her limbs become weak.  This condition can start with cerebral lesions in your dog’s brain near her neck.
  2. Vestibulocochlear – Damage to this nerve in your dog’s inner ear can cause hearing problems, dog head tilt and change your dog’s head and neck position.  Your dog may tend to lean over, tip over and even roll over.
  3. Cerebellar – Your dog may have uncoordinated movement, head tremors and swaying of her body. 

Causes of Ataxia

  • Spinal cord – Your dog’s ataxia may be caused by things like degeneration of nerves, loss of blood from a blood clot, malformation, cancer, as spinal cyst, infections or a trauma to her spinal cord.
  • Metabolic – Your dog may be anemic or have low blood sugar and low potassium levels.
  • Neurologic – Your dog may contract an inflammatory anti-immune disease to her central nervous system.
  • Vestibular – Your dog may get a fungal infection in her middle ear which can affect her peripheral nervous system and lead to dog head tilt.

Diagnosis of Ataxia Symptoms

  • Health history – Whenever your dog shows abnormal behavior, it’s critical to keep a journal so you can give your veterinarian a clear, step by step description of your dog’s illness with actual dates when symptoms were noticed.
  • Tests – Your veterinarian may order tests including blood counts, urinalysis, MRI and X-rays to determine if your dog has cancer.  Your dog may need an ultrasound to check her pancreas, liver and kidney function.
  • Expenses – 
  • If you have dog health insurance, some of your expenses may be covered, however you can expect initial bills to add up to over $3,000 if your dog has Ataxia.

Treatment for Your Dog with Ataxia and Dog Head Tilt

  • Drugs –  Consult with your veterinarian about drugs to treat your dog with Ataxia if your dog experiences pain from inflammation.  Ask your vet about alternative medicines and all potential side effects.
  • Exercise – Your dog’s motor skills may be limited and you might need to make changes in your home to help your dog from sliding on slippery floors. 
  • Products – Look into products that might help your dog grip the floor better or dog wheelchairs that allow your dog more mobility.

This news brief gives you information about symptoms, causes, diagnosis and treatment of Ataxia so you can take better care of your dog.  Much thanks to Margaret Ditty and Cricket for the work they are doing to help dog parents.  Awareness of signs of diseases can make a huge difference because you’ll know when to bring your dog to your local vet or emergency animal hospital if needed.

Share this article with your friends and family so they can watch for signs of abnormal or excessive dog head tilt in their dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

By the way… claim your FREE “How NOT to Overpay to Keep Your Dog Well” video news.  Just go HERE now to get your Dog Health and Wellness Video News.

Dog insurance and cat insurance from Healthy Paws Pet Insurance. Get pet insurance reviews. Compare pet insurance plans.

Dog Vaccination Schedule ~ Dosage and Dog Health Risks

Dog Vaccination ScheduleYour dog vaccination schedule is reviewed when you and millions of responsible dog owners bring your dog to your local veterinarian for your dog’s annual wellness visit.  Over the years, most dog owners leave it up to their vet to make the decision on what vaccines are necessary and how often their dog should be vaccinated, however there is not enough attention paid to serious side effects which can permanently harm your dog’s health from over-vaccinating.

This short video with Margaret Ditty and her dog, Cricket, gives you all the information you need to ask more questions about your dog’s next shot so you can keep your dog healthy.

Your Dog Vaccination Schedule: 3 Key Questions to Ask Your Veterinarian

Dog Vaccination ScheduleYou’ll hear Margaret Ditty’s gripping story about her Chihuahua named Cricket in the interview below.  Margaret is the founder of Pet Parents Fighting GME.  If you own a toy breed, your dog is more prone to this disease, however no breed is exempt. 

3 Key Questions to Ask:

  1. Does my dog need this vaccination?
  2. Is the dosage safe for my dog’s breed, size and age?
  3. Can I have a titer test to determine if my dog needs this vaccination?

Cricket’s disease, Granulomatous Meningoencephalitis (GME) is an inflammatory auto-immune disease that affects her central nervous system.

Margaret Ditty and Cricket on Dog Health News TV

You can go to Pet Parents Fighting GME for more information and also read Cricket’s story to get further details.

This news brief about your dog vaccination schedule helps you to ask more questions about vaccines and consider alternative ways to care for your dog’s health.  Margaret Ditty’s story about Cricket shows you one dog out of millions who suffer from the results of too many vaccines, incorrect dosage of vaccines and medications, and lack of information about symptoms.  Awareness of symptoms related to dog health illnesses along with fast action might save your dog’s life.

Dog Vaccination ScheduleShare this article and interview with your friends and family or anyone you feel would benefit from Cricket’s story so they can help protect their dog from chronic health diseases like GME.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like more video news on how to Keep Your Dog Well and NOT overpay for it, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Cost Effectively Keep Your Dog Well” video news. Go HERE to get it FREE.

Dog insurance and cat insurance from Healthy Paws Pet Insurance. Get pet insurance reviews. Compare pet insurance plans.
FREE DOG WELLNESS VIDEOS: The Secrets To Keeping Your Dog Well And Reducing Your Vet Bills
Free Instant Access