Insurance for Dogs: Flexible Coverage for Any Budget

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Insurance for Dogs

The reason you need insurance for dogs like yours is because 1 out of 3 dogs suffer from an accident or injury before they turn 3 years old and it isn’t until you’re faced with a $3,000 bill for your dog’s emergency room services after she swallows a bottle of your Ibuprofen that you wish you had signed her up for dog health insurance.

This news brief will help you make sense out of the confusing insurance jargon you may have already read.  After reading this article, you’ll be clear about what’s covered and not covered through insurance.  Most people may not know that dog health insurance provides you flexible payment options that will fit any budget to keep your dog healthy. 

Insurance for Dogs:  What’s Covered and Not Covered

What’s Covered:

  1. Illnesses, Injuries, Accidents – With dog health insurance, your dog will be covered for treatment of new accidents, illnesses and injuries after your enrollment.  You may have a 2 week waiting period for dog insurance companies to check out your Insurance for Dogsdog’s medical records and notes from your veterinarian that would show pre-existing conditions which could prevent approval of insurance coverage.
  2. Hereditary and Congenital Conditions – Some dog health insurance companies cover your dog for hereditary and congenital conditions like eye disorders or knee issues.  This means that your dog could qualify for insurance coverage even if you may have thought these conditions were considered pre-existing.
  3. Unlimited Lifetime Benefits   Look for insurance for dogs with no annual or per incident limits.  Shop around for a plan with no incident caps or maximum limits.
  4. Customized Reimbursement – You can create a flexible plan that fits your budget with deductibles and reimbursement levels you can change as needed.
  5. Veterinarians, Hospitals, Specialists – You can select a dog Insurance for Dogsinsurance company that allows you to use any licensed veterinarian including animal emergency hospitals and specialists.  Your dog’s coverage includes: diagnostic testing, x-rays, hospitalization and treatments, surgeries and prescriptions.
  6. Hip Dysplasia – You can get lifetime coverage for your dog’s hip dysplasia, however you need to enroll your dog before she turns 6 years old.  Maryland and New Hampshire are the only states in the U.S. that don’t have a 12 month waiting period before hip dysplasia coverage takes effect.  This means you need to sign up for insurance for dogs with hip dysplasia before your dog is 5 years old for this coverage which requires a complete physical hip exam.

What’s Not Covered:

  1. Pre-existing conditions – Your dog may have a pre-existing condition like allergies or diabetes that has been treated by your veterinarian before your dog’s health insurance coverage starts.  No dog insurance company covers pre-existing conditions.
  2. Veterinarian exams – Annual veterinarian visits are not covered because this is part of the responsibility of dog ownership.
  3. Spay/neuter procedures – These procedures are not covered by dog insurance companies because they don’t qualify as an illness, injury or accident.
  4. Preventative care Insurance for dogs does not cover vaccinations or a titer test, heart-worm medication, de-worming, grooming and nail trim.
  5. Dental care – Your dog’s dental cleanings and care are not covered.  The only exceptions are when your dog’s teeth are injured in an accident which requires extractions or reconstruction.
  6. Behavioral treatments – Training, medications for behavioral conditions and therapy for behavioral modification is not covered by dog health insurance.
  7. Parasite control – Prophylactic treatments for internal and external parasites are not covered by dog insurance companies.
  8. Housing, Exercise and Food  Dog health insurance does not cover the cost of your dog’s housing, exercise, toys, treats and food.

This news brief gives you all the information you need to know about what’s covered and not covered by insurance for dogs.  You can use these points to find flexible insurance coverage for your dog that fits any budget.

Share this article with your friends and family so they have a checklist to use when they look for health insurance coverage for their dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

Add your comments about your dog’s health insurance experience below so others can benefit from your story.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like breaking news on how to NOT overpay for your dog’s healthcare costs and reduce the number of times your dog gets sick, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

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Dog Farts:  6 Ways to Minimize Your Dog’s Smelly Gas

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Dog Farts

Dog farts sneak up on you quietly until you notice something smells rotten and you can’t breathe because your dog shamelessly stinks up your home and embarrasses you in front of your friends and family with her farts.  Your dog’s foul smelling farts, however, might be a clue that she suffers from a dangerous health condition like Pancreatitis or inflammatory bowel disease.

This article helps you understand what causes your dog to expel smelly gas so you can rule out any serious dog health disorders and discover solutions that keep your dog healthy.  If your dog doesn’t have a serious health condition, you may be able to also eliminate or minimize your dog’s farts with the tips below.

6 Reasons Your Dog Farts

  1. Breed Predisposition – Brachycephalic dogs with pushed in faces like Boston Terriers, Boxers and Bulldogs are prone to flatulence because they tend to eat quickly and inhale more air with their food when they swallow.
  2. Diet – Bacterial fermentation from indigestible carbohydrates like meat products or soybeans creates stinky dog gas.  Toxic substances, overfeeding and a sudden change in your dog’s diet can increase your dog’s flatulence and result in bad odors that escape as a fart.
  3. Intestinal Parasites – Parvovirus and Giardia are examples of intestinal parasites which can give your dog’s gas a foul smell. 
  4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease – Your dog may have food allergies or leaky gut disorders that create fermentation and smelly dog farts.
  5. Pancreatitis – Infections to your dog’s pancreas can cause flatulence and result in a foul odor when your dog releases gas.
  6. Antibiotics – Medications for your dog’s medical conditions may also give your dog gas and have a distinctly sour smell.

Note:  Bring your dog to your veterinarian when your dog’s gas has a pungent odor.  Early detection of dangerous health conditions can help you prevent your dog from discomfort and save you thousands of dollars in dog health expenses.    

6 Tips to Eliminate Your Dog’s Smelly Gas

These tips may help reduce the odor of your dog’s farts and make your home smell fresher: 

1. Diet – Give your dog ground turkey, canned pumpkin and cooked sweet potato to help reduce excessive gas.  Ask your veterinarian to help you with a nutritionally balanced diet for your dog to help dog farts.   Change from commercially processed dog food to fresh home-cooked food. 

2. Portions – Feed your dog smaller portions to reduce bacterial fermentation that could cause smelly dog gas. 

3. Exercise – Give your dog plenty of exercise to burn off calories and help reduce her flatulence.

4. Poops & Piddles – Walk your dog for at least 30 minutes after meals so she can avoid constipation or diarrhea.  Consistent daily urine and fecal elimination can help keep your dog’s intestines clean which reduces smelly gas.

5. Herbal remedies – Add a pinch of black pepper or parsley to your dog’s meals to help reduce gas. You can also pour some cool chamomile tea in your dog’s water bowl to soothe stomach upsets that may cause dog farts.

6. Diffuser – Add 3 drops of peppermint or lavender essential oil to your room diffuser to make your home smell fresh.

This article gives you 6 reasons your dog releases foul gas which could help you discover an infection like Pancreatitis in time to prevent further damage to your dog’s health. You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

Share your stories about flatulence so dog parents can learn from your experience and help their dogs who may have smelly gas.

By the way… claim your FREE “How NOT to Overpay to Keep Your Dog Well” video news.  Just go HERE now to get your Dog Health and Wellness Video News.

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Lyme Disease: Protect your Dog From Tick Bite Threats

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Lyme DiseaseLyme Disease threatens your dog’s health because ticks know how easy it is to latch onto your dog’s body for a tasty meal.  Large populations of these bloodsuckers lounge around all year in places like woody trails and campgrounds where you take your dog for walks or enjoy vacations with your family. 

There’s no magic bullet to stop the spread of ticks because climate change and reforestation has widened the range for tick infestation. What’s more frightening is that warmer winters allow hosts for ticks to survive longer.

This news brief gives you tips to help you protect your dog against tick bites and prevent these nasty parasites from zapping your dog’s energy.  I hope this article helps you understand why it’s so important to check your dog for ticks every day to protect your dog from tick bite threats.

Symptoms of Dog Lyme Disease

Your dog will not show the bull’s eye rash that appears on people who have lyme.  Symptoms associated with dog lyme include:

  • Pain – Your dog may start to whine or have behavior that shows he’s uncomfortable due to headaches and swollen joints.
  • Fever – Watch for increased panting or lack of energy that could mean your dog has a fever.
  • Lack of appetite – Your dog may be lethargic and not be Lyme Diseaseinterested in food or treats.
  • Lameness – Joint pain from inflammation can be a sign of lyme.  Bring your dog to your veterinarian to have him checked for Lyme Disease if he favors all four legs.

8 Places on Your Dog’s Body to Look for Ticks

  1. Hair  Spend 15-30 minutes with a comb to check your dog’s skin and hair for ticks.
  2. Ears – Search around the edges of your dog’s ear flaps and inside his ears for ticks.
  3. Muzzle – Check your dog’s entire mouth including his gums, tongue and cheeks.
  4. Face – Look at all parts of your dog’s face, eyebrows and under his chin.
  5. Neck – Remove your dog’s collar and make sure there are no ticks around his neck.
  6. Paws – Look carefully in between your dog’s toes for ticks or redness.
  7. Hidden areas – Check out private areas where your dog can’t see the ticks or reach them.
  8. Vascular areas – Check your dog’s body where you’ll find blood sources like behind your dog’s knees, on his back and under his belly.

Lyme DiseaseLyme Disease Protection for your Dog

It’s a big mistake to stop tick control for your dog in winter months.  Ticks even come out on a day over 40 degrees to look for a host like your dog for a good meal.

Take these steps to protect your dog:

  • Avoid ticks – Keep your dog away from places where ticks hide like wet grassy areas, high grass and bushes, shaded areas and roughs on golf courses.
  • Herbal remedies – You can mix 3-6 drops of 100% pure therapeutic grade peppermint essential oil in a spray bottle of unrefined coconut oil. Spray this natural tick repellant mixture over your dog’s body.  Keep the spray away from your dog’s eyes and nose.  Other essential oils you can choose to repel ticks include: lavender, lemon, citronella, sage, bergamot, cedar wood, eucalyptus, lemongrass, geranium, sweet orange, or rosemary.  Only use one essential oil at a time on your dog.
  • Daily check for ticks – The best way to keep your dog safe from Lyme Disease is to check your dog daily especially if you live in areas where ticks are known to thrive.
  • Remove ticks quickly – You can kill ticks on your dog within 24 hours of a bite to prevent the disease from being transmitted to your dog.

Important Note:  Tick repellants, insecticides and natural products can’t give you a 100% guarantee your dog won’t get bitten by a tick.

This article gives you tips to help you protect your dog against the health threats of tick bites.  Even though it takes time to check your dog for ticks every day, you may save your dog from a life long battle against Lyme Disease

If you liked these Dog Health News tips to protect your dog from tick bites, leave a comment below.  Share your stories about ticks so dog parents can benefit from your dog’s experience and solutions.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like breaking news on how to NOT overpay for your dog’s healthcare costs and reduce the number of times your dog gets sick, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

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Dog Seizures: Real Stories to Clarify Your Challenge

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Dog Seizures

Dog seizures may start suddenly in the still of the night when you hear your dog cry and find him sprawled on the floor in a pool of his own vomit.  These short epileptic seizures can last less than a minute, however you and your dog could end up exhausted at an emergency animal clinic after several visits to more than one vet for tests and evaluations. You may be so frustrated that you wonder if there’s a light at the end of the tunnel or whether you’ll eventually lose your dog from these violent seizures.

This news story gives you 2 insightful seizure submissions sent to Dog Health News from dog owners who shared their struggle with their dogs‘ seizures. My hope is you’ll be able to glean information from their stories to help you cope with your dog’s seizures.  I understand your pain when you see your dog experience his seizure and how difficult it may be for you to find a satisfactory solution.

Dog Seizures Submissions to Dog Health News

You may already know that all dog breeds can suffer from seizures at an early age. Statistics show idiopathic seizures could occur in 6% of dogs.

This means you need to know what you should do for your dog so you don’t panic or cause harm to your dog during his seizure if he shows symptoms like: convulsions, excessive panting and vomiting.

The dog parent seizure submissions below illustrate why it’s so important for you to now notice changes in your dog’s behavior, muscle strength and energy level.  Your dog may need to have blood work and x-rays, take prescription drugs and require continual care which could lead to high dog health expenses. 

Dog SeizuresDog health insurance may help you cover some of your medical expenses.

Now, Phenobarbital and Zonisamide are epileptic drugs used as anticonvulsants.  However, your dog may experience side effects from these drugs like: ataxia, anxiety, weight gain and loss of muscle control. 

Check with your veterinarian for all the details related to your dog’s specific condition before you give your dog these drugs.

Kimberly’s Dog Seizures Submission

“My 3 year old Chihuahua suddenly developed weakness, stiffening of the neck and back and yelping as if in pain. I would hold him until he was comfortable, and he would stop crying. This left him extremely tired. 

We took him to the vet and was told he is having epileptic seizures. The blood work showed nothing .

It did appear that it was some sort of episode.  After being on Phenobarbital for 3 long weeks he is still doing all the same things. 

Finally we took him to an emergency clinic, and they did full x-rays, and showed us a tiny separation in his neck vertebrae. He is now on muscle relaxers and pain meds. 

He seems to be much better until during the night he had another episode.”

Kristina’s Dog Seizures Submission

“I have an 11 month old Siberian Husky that has short seizures very frequently.

The seizures began 3 days after he was neutered when he was 7 months old. 

He vomits and then immediately has a 30-40 second seizure. The first vet prescribed Phenobarbital twice per day after a standard blood, urine, and fecal analysis.  Diagnosis: Epilepsy. 

The longest he would go without a seizure was 2 weeks. 

The second vet tested his blood extensively and tested for a liver shunt.  All is normal except that his red blood cells are smaller than normal.  Diagnosis: Epilepsy. 

They prescribed Zonisamide. He went 2 1/2 weeks without a seizure on both medicines. 

Now we are trying to ween him off of the Phenobarbital and he has seizures every week and a half. The second vet suggests we play it by ear at this point. 

He may have to take both medicines, but we don’t want him to die of liver failure at a young age because of it.

The only other option is an MRI and spinal tap which costs well beyond what we can afford right now.

My question is even if we have an MRI and find out he has some other neurological problem, is there really any other medications that will change his status?

I know there are other anti-seizure medications, but is there really going to be a light at the end of this?

Did the anesthesia from his neutering cause this?  Every time he vomits, even if he just ate some grass because his belly didn’t feel good, he has a seizure. 

At first we thought seizures were his trauma reaction from eating things he shouldn’t have like plastic or pieces of a toy.  He’s so young and I don’t want to lose him to a grand mal.”

4 Dog Seizures Management Tips

  1. Prevention – Eliminate salty treats or food that contain potassium bromide which may lead to your dog’s seizures.
  2. Medication – Be careful about administering medication to control your dog’s epileptic seizures.  Any disruption in dosage may aggravate or initiate seizures.
  3. Diet – Medications for seizure control can cause weight gain so you may want to ask your veterinarian to help you with a diet plan for your dog.
  4. Herbal Remedy – You can use Turmeric, a powerful pain reliever and anti-inflammatory herb to help with your dog’s Dog Seizuresepilepsy.  Daily dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your dog’s weight and not exceed 2 teaspoons for dogs over 100 pounds.

This news story gave you first-hand accounts surrounding dog seizures so you’re aware of the symptoms related to epileptic seizures and specific questions you can ask your veterinarian. 

I want you to know that dog seizures are almost never fatal.  Your goal should be to reduce the frequency of your dog’s epileptic episodes so you minimize your dog’s suffering and manage his condition.

You can also submit your dog seizure experience and your solutions in the comment section below.

Share this article with other people you know who face challenges with their dog’s epileptic seizures.

I hope you received value from this article today.  I’d love to hear your feedback.  Leave your comments with your thoughts or questions.  Also, you can click on the social media links below to share this article… Thank you!

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Dog Daycare: What’s Your Plan If You Have an Emergency?

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Dog daycare may not be on your top priority list until your 85 year old uncle falls down the stairs, spends 4 days in the hospital, requires 3 weeks of physical therapy and needs to install a stairlift before he can go home and care for his dog who’s now your responsibility or even worse, you’re franticly in need of someone to foster your uncle’s 10 year old dog for several weeks and have no idea how your uncle and his dog will deal with  separation.

This news brief gives you an example of one dog owner’s emergency situation so you’ll have a strategy to create a care team for an injured dog owner and their beloved dog.

Dog Daycare: 8 Helpful Tips for Emergency Coverage

  1. Dog Foster Care – You never know when you’ll need a trustworthy dog sitter who can take over full responsibility for your loved one’s dog in an emergency.  A good strategy would be to have a dog sitter and a foster home in case you need a temporary or permanent solution to care for a senior’s dog when something goes wrong.
  2. Keys – You’ll need at least 5 sets of keys to give out to your care team to handle things like taking out trash, picking up mail or retrieving personal items for your loved one.  You may need to give keys to your dog daycare manager, housekeeper or a service company if work needs to be done.
  3. Phone numbers – Emergency numbers including dog sitters, family members, friends, doctors, home care facilities and financial planners should be kept in a safe place that the care team can access readily.
  4. Dog food & treats – Your care team needs to know where the dog food and treats are kept as well as the daily portions.  You may want to put notes on the refrigerator for easy reference.
  5. Leashes, harnesses and jackets – To make things easy, keep the dog’s leashes, harnesses and jackets in one place near the door you’ll use to take the dog out.  Don’t forget the doggie waste bags too!  You may want to have an emergency kit ready in case you need to bring it along to your dog daycare facility so your senior’s dog will have all the things he needs including one of his toys.
  6. Medications – It’s critical to know all the medications taken by your senior and their dog.  You can keep a list of these items in the kitchen on the refrigerator  with instructions for dosage and where to renew prescriptions as needed.
  7. Veterinarian – Another much needed item on your checklist is the contact information for your senior’s veterinarian including the number for your local emergency animal hospital.
  8. Instructions for dog care – Your senior might have special daily routines with his dog.  A smart idea is to write them down and give them to your care team, dog daycare facility or foster dog parents so everyone has the same instructions for dog care. 

Fred and Sasha’s Story

  • Fred – The good news here is that Fred had a care team in place and were able to put a plan together immediately. Since Fred managed to dial 911 to get emergency help for himself, the next top priority was finding a foster home for his dog, Sasha, a lively 10 year old Cairn Terrier who looks like Toto from the well known classic movie, The Wizard of Oz.  After a long discussion with his care team including what to do about dog daycare, of High Energy Dogscourse, Fred agreed to the installation of a stairlift as the first step to safe-proofing his home.  Fred can’t wait to come home from from the rehab facility so he can be reunited with his best pal Sasha.  He’s grateful for his care team beyond words.
  • Sasha – As part of Fred’s care team, I’m lucky to be able to take Sasha for weekly walks by the ocean.  Even though I know Sasha could literally lift me off my feet if I let her pull me down the street, she is a perfect example of a well behaved dog.  Fred says that Sasha loves anyone she’s with, however I’m certain her heart remains with her owner and I bet she can’t wait to come home soon and be with Fred.  Dog daycare in Sasha’s case would be only for emergencies.

This short story gives you a heartwarming story and tips for emergency coverage so you can put together a care team for your loved one and their dog in case something unforeseen happens.

Share this article with friends and family so they’ll have information they may need to care for their loved one who owns a dog in case of an emergency.

By the way… claim your FREE “How NOT to Overpay to Keep Your Dog Well” video news.  Just go HERE now to get your Dog Health and Wellness Video News.

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