10 Powerful Herbs to Keep Dog Digestive Systems Healthy

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Dog Digestive SystemsYou may already know how dog digestive systems work but you could be the cause of your dog’s digestion problems when you give her table scraps like pizza and potato chips that contain spices, carbohydrates and salt which are not easy for your dog to digest… the results can be a real mess when you have to clean up your dog’s diarrhea or vomit and then you may need to pay for vet visits to heal your dog’s tummy ache and chronic digestion conditions.

This health article explains how your dog’s digestive system works and gives you 10 powerful herbs to choose from to keep her healthy.  I hope after you read this article you’ll have the information you need to help prevent your dog from chronic digestive health issues.

How Dog Digestive Systems Work

Your dog’s tongue pushes food into her esophagus that connects her mouth to her stomach. That means your dog’s esophagus works hard to push her food along because your dog doesn’t chew her food before she swallows.

Here’s what happens to your dog’s food after she eats:

  • Stomach: Your dog’s stomach stores food delivered through her esophagus. Gastric folds in your dog’s stomach help grind and digest her food along with acids and enzymes that break down her food. It takes about 12 hours for your dog’s food to leave her stomach and enter her small intestine in dog digestive systems.
  • Small Intestine: Your dog’s small intestine has 3 parts that connect her stomach to her large intestine. These parts are the duodenum, jejunum and ileum.  The function of your dog’s Dog Digestive Systemsduodenum is to connect with her gallbladder bile and pancreatic ducts to mix with digestive enzymes and help your dog digest her food. The function of the jejunum is absorption of nutrients and is the longest part of your dog’s small intestine.  The ileum passes the remaining contents into your dog’s large intestine.
  • Large Intestine: Your dog’s large intestine connects her small intestine to her anus and is larger in diameter.  This means that her large intestine’s function is to absorb water from her feces through her dog digestive systems until she has a bowel movement.  The parts of your dog’s large intestine include her cecum and colon.

10 Herbal Remedies to Keep Your Dog’s Digestive System Healthy

Your can choose from these 10 herbal remedies to keep your dog digestive tract health.

  1. Aloe vera juice – restore and promote regularity, digestion and pH balance.  Blend 1/8 teaspoon organic honey with 1 teaspoon Dog Digestive Systemsnatural aloe to cut the bitter flavor.  Stir this blend into your dog’s water bowl or mix with her food.  Aloe vera juice can cause diarrhea, so start with 1/2 teaspoon daily for dogs under 10 pounds and no more than 1 teaspoon daily for dogs over 10 pounds.
  2. Organic Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) – support your dog’s digestion.  Use 1/8 teaspoon ACV daily for dogs under 10 pounds, and 1/4 teaspoon daily for dogs over 10 pounds.  Add ACV to your dog’s meal in the morning or at night for healthy dog digestive systems.
  3. Bone broth and bone broth powder – help support your dog’s immune and digestive system.  Make this easy anti-inflammatory broth on your stove with organic grass-fed cow bones. Add a pinch of turmeric as an extra anti-inflammatory boost.  Pour enough water in your crock pot to cover bones with an extra 3 inches of water above the bones.  Add 3-4 tablespoons organic apple cider vinegar to pull out minerals from the bones.  Cook on high for 1 hour, then on low heat for 24 hours.  Remove bones and dispose.  Don’t allow your dog to chew on these cooked bones because they’re brittle.  Add 1/4 cup of cool bone broth to your dog’s food if she’s under 10 pounds.  You can add 1/2 cup cool bone broth to your dog’s food if she’s over 10 pounds.
  4. Dandelions – help your dog digestive systems including pancreatitis, immune system, kidneys, liver and gallbladder.  Dog Digestive SystemsYour dog can eat dandelions right out of your backyard as long as you don’t use pesticides or herbicides on your grass. Dry some dandelions and sprinkle a teaspoon into her food.  Add 1/4 cup of cool dandelion tea to your dog’s water bowl or mix with her food.  Increase the amount to 1/2 cup for dogs over 20 pounds.
  5. Jerusalem artichoke – a tuberous root you can use in powder form to help her digestion.  Add 1 teaspoon grated Jerusalem artichoke to your dog’s food daily.  Bake Jerusalem artichokes in your oven like potatoes.  Cool artichokes and mash into your dog’s food.
  6. Lemons – alkalize your dog’s pH level, promote liver health, boost immunity and dog digestive systems.  Use 1/4 teaspoon or less daily for small dogs under 10 pounds.  Use 1 – 2 teaspoons daily for medium to large dogs.  Add 1/2 teaspoon grated, chopped or finely minced lemon to your dog’s food at morning or night.  Keep lemon parts refrigerated in an air tight glass receptacle to keep fresh.
  7. Quassia bark – help your dog’s digestion, liver disease, gallbladder and upset stomach.  You can use 1-2 drops of quassia bark tincture in your dog’s food daily for all health conditions listed above.
  8. Rosemary – has anti-microbial and antioxidant qualities which help with dog digestive systems.  You can add a pinch of rosemary to your dog’s food daily.
  9. Thyme – helps settle your dog’s stomach, improve digestion and relieve bowel problems like diarrhea.  Pour 1/4 cup cool thyme leaf tea in your dog’s water bowl or add a pinch of thyme to her food once daily.
  10. Turmeric – powerful anti-inflammatory herb, helps as a remedy for liver disease.  Heat up a mixture of 1/2 cup turmeric powder, 2 cups water, 1/4 cup coconut oil and 1 teaspoon Dog Digestive Systemsground black pepper to make a thick paste.  You can refrigerate your turmeric paste in a sealed glass container and keep for 1 month.  Add turmeric paste to your dog’s food 3 times a week to help your dog digestive systems and reduce diarrhea.  Dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your dog’s weight and not exceed 1 teaspoon for dogs over 100 pounds.  Check with your vet before you give turmeric to your dog to make sure it will not interfere with your dog’s medications or health conditions.

You’ve just read about 10 herbal remedies to keep your dog’s digestive system healthy.  These herbs are also safe to use for you and your family to support digestion.

Share this article about dog digestive systems with your friends and family so they have ways to keep their dog healthy with powerful herbs.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

By the way… claim your FREE “How NOT to Overpay to Keep Your Dog Well” video news.  Just go HERE now to get your Dog Health and Wellness Video News.

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Puppy Diarrhea: Key Causes, Remedies and Prevention

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Puppy DiarrheaPuppy diarrhea could be messy to clean up and even make you sick to think something may be horribly wrong with your pup however her tummy can easily get upset which may result in diarrhea and dehydration… that means you need to know about the causes of your puppy’s diarrhea and take action before she needs emergency care to get rid of a parasite or treat a viral infection.

This health article gives you the causes of your puppy’s diarrhea including.  I hope after you read this information you’ll be able to take better care of your puppy and prevent her diarrhea.

7 Key Causes of Puppy Diarrhea

  1. Bacterial infection    Bacteria like Clostridium,  E. coli and Salmonella can cause your puppy to have diarrhea.
  2. Diet change – Diarrhea can result when you add new foods too quickly to your dog’s diet. You may also discover your dog has food allergies like lactose intolerance which can cause diarrhea.
  3. Parasites  – Coccidia, giardia, hookworms, roundworms and whipworms can cause severe diarrhea which will require you to bring your puppy to your veterinarian for treatment.
  4. Side effects – Use of  Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can give your puppy a case of diarrhea as a side effect. Herbal remedies like Aloe Vera, Boswellia, Ginkgo Biloba and Grape Seed Extract could also result in puppy diarrhea.
  5. Stress – Your puppy might be anxious around people and be scared of her environment because of street traffic and noise.  Stress can create an upset stomach that unfortunately creates loose stools or diarrhea.
  6. Toxic substance – Poisons and toxins like antifreeze, spoiled garbage and poisonous plants can give your puppy diarrhea. Keep your trash and garbage out of your puppies reach at all times to be safe.
  7. Viral infection – Parvovirus and distemper can be fatal diseases for your unvaccinated or partially vaccinated puppy.  Coronavirus can cause viral diarrhea and requires you to seek immediate medical care for your puppy.

3 Safe Herbal Remedies for Puppy Diarrhea

Try one of these 3 herbal remedies for your puppy’s diarrhea:

  1. Plantain is a backyard weed that’s good for diarrhea, chronic bowel disease and can help as a lubricant to remove foreign objects your dog has eaten.  Put plantain leaves in your blender or juicer and give your puppy 1/4 teaspoon daily for every 10 pounds.
  2. Thyme helps settle your dog’s stomach, improve digestion and relieve bowel problems like diarrhea. Pour 1/4 cup cool thyme leaf tea in your puppy’s water bowl or add a pinch of thyme to her food once daily.
  3. Turmeric, a powerful anti-inflammatory herb, helps as a remedy for puppy diarrhea. Heat up a mixture of 1/4 cup turmeric powder, 1 cups water, 1/8 cup coconut oil and a pinch of ground black pepper to make a thick paste.  You can refrigerate your turmeric paste in a sealed glass container and keep for 1 month.  Add turmeric paste to your puppy’s food twice a week to quiet her diarrhea. Dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/8 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your puppy’s weight.

Note:  Keep your puppy hydrated because diarrhea can cause dehydration very quickly.

Quick Tips to Prevent Puppy Diarrhea

  • Switch your puppy to a new diet slowly. 
  • Keep your puppy’s environment clean especially if your she plays with other puppies.
  • Vaccinate your puppy at the appropriate ages and keep her away from unvaccinated puppies or dogs.
  • Crate your puppy when she is not supervised to prevent her from toxic substances.
  • Learn about parasite prevention from your veterinarian.
  • Pick up your puppy’s poop and keep her away from poop in the street.

Now that you’ve read this article on puppy diarrhea you will be able to take better care of your puppy and help prevent her from getting loose stools.

Share this article with your family and friends so they will know what to do to help their puppy with diarrhea.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Dog Blood: Disorders, Symptoms and Safe Treatments

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Dog BloodDog blood disorders may alarm you when you see excessive bleeding after your dog cuts herself on a sharp object like the edge of your table or a bone and you might notice your dog bruises easily when she plays with other dogs…  even worse you may have to clean up a bloody mess after your dog has a nosebleed which ends up with an emergency visit to your veterinarian to find out what’s wrong with your dog’s blood.

This health article about your dog’s bleeding disorders explains causes, symptoms and treatments to help you keep your dog safe. 

3 Symptoms of Dog Blood Disorders

Accurate reports of your dog’s symptoms are critical for your veterinarian to be able to properly diagnose your dog’s blood disorder.  You will need to include the severity and dates of each episode. 

Your veterinarian will conduct a urinalysis to look at proteins in your dog’s urine and order a complete blood count to review her platelet count, anemia, clotting and check for abnormal red and white blood cells.

Here are 3 blood disorder symptoms:

  1. Bleeding – Your dog may have spontaneous and excessive bleeding from a simple cut or surgery.  This means you need to check your dog’s body and her mouth for signs of dog blood disorders in case of spontaneous bleeding that may not be caused by an injury.
  2. Nosebleeds – You may see blood dripping from your dog’s nose or blood in her water bowl due to irritated or swollen blood vessels.
  3. Bruising – Your dog’s blood vessels may be sensitive to pressure which results in bruising during surgery or active play with people and other dogs.

5 Causes of Your Dog’s Bleeding Disorders

  1. Congenital Clotting Protein Disorder – Hypofibrinogenemia, a genetically inherited protein deficiency, can prevent blot clotting in breeds like Saint Bernard and Vizsla.
  2. Deficiency of Factor VII – Bruising and excessive bleeding during surgery occurs due to the deficiency of a dog blood clotting protein called Factor VII found in these breeds:  Alaskan Malamute, Beagle, Boxer, English Bulldog and Miniature Schnauzer.
  3. Canine Thombopathia – This disorder is due to a congenital defect in the function of platelets where they don’t clot properly. The only breed affected by Canine Thombopathia is the Basset Hound.  Symptoms include nosebleed, bleeding gums, and tiny spot-like bruises on your dog’s skin.
  4. Von Willebrand’s Disease – The most common congenital bleeding disorder is Von Willebrand’s factor, a deficiency in the protein that regulates blood clot formation. These breeds are most prone to this dog blood disorder: Basset Hound, Doberman Pinscher, German Shepherd, Golden Retriever, Miniature Schnauzer, Pembroke Welsh Corgi, Standard Manchester Terrier, Standard Poodle, Scottish Terrier, and Shetland Sheepdog.
  5. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever – This disease is caused by the Rickettsia parasite transmitted by ticks which kills blood cells and causes your dog’s blood vessels to swell. Symptoms include nosebleeds, bruises, bloody urine or feces, and bleeding in your dog’s retina.

Safe Treatment of Your Dog’s Blood Disorders

  • Platelet transfusion – Your dog with a decreased platelet count may require a platelet transfusion.
  • Cell transfusion – Your dog with anemia may require a cell transfusion of whole blood or packed red blood cell type.
  • Home care and checkupsDog blood disorders require regular visits to your veterinarian to monitor your dog’s urine and blood counts. You should restrict your dog’s movement If she has a bleeding episode. Give your dog soft food if she has bleeding gums and don’t let your dog chew on bones or hard toys.

Note: If your dog has a congenital bleeding disorder, you may want to have your dog spayed or neutered in order to prevent passing her disorder along to her puppies.

4 Herbal Remedies to Keep Your Dog’s Blood Healthy

Choose from these 4 herbal remedies to help support your dog with dog blood disorders:

  1. Bone broth and bone broth powder – helps support your dog’s immune system and detoxify her blood.  Make this broth with organic grass-fed cow bones.  Pour enough water in your crock pot to cover bones with an extra 3 inches of water above the bones.  Add 3-4 tablespoons organic apple cider vinegar to pull out minerals from the bones.  Cook on high for 1 hour, then on low heat for 24 hours.  Remove bones and dispose.  Don’t allow your dog to chew on these cooked bones because they’re brittle.  Add 1/4 cup of cool bone broth to your dog’s food if she’s under 10 pounds or 1/2 cup if she’s over 10 pounds.
  2. Marjoram – high in beta carotenes, essential oils, lutein & xanthins, iron, and vitamins A, C & K which helps with dog blood conditions like blood circulation.  Sprinkle marjoram powder in your dog’s food or add cool marjoram tea to her water or food bowl.  Marjoram is also available in capsules.  Dosage for small dogs:  Pinch of powder,  1/2 capsule, up to 1/4 cup tea.  Dosage for medium to large dogs: 1-2 teaspoons daily, 1 capsule, 1/2 – 1 cup tea.
  3. Plantain – a backyard weed that’s good for blood clotting.  Put plantain leaves in your blender or juicer and give your dog 1 teaspoon daily for every 20 pounds.
  4. Turmeric – a powerful anti-inflammatory herb that can help dog blood disorders by reducing blood clots. Heat a mixture of 1/2 cup turmeric powder, 2 cups water, 1/4 cup coconut oil and 1 teaspoon ground black pepper to make a thick paste.  You can refrigerate turmeric paste in a sealed glass container and keep for 1 month.  Dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your dog’s weight and not exceed 1 teaspoon for dogs over 100 pounds.  Turmeric is known as a “warming” spice and should not be given to dogs with dog blood disorders who are naturally hot or pant excessively.  Check with your vet before you give turmeric to your dog to make sure it will not interfere with your dog’s medications or health conditions.

Now you know about blood disorders, causes and treatments that could affect your dog’s health.  I hope this article helps you with your dog’s blood challenges.  You can share your dog’s blood story in our comments section below.

Share this health article on blood disorders with your family and friends so they have all the information they need to take care of their dog who may have a dog blood disease.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like easy to follow news briefs to Get a Handle On Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs, claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

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Can Dogs Eat Potatoes? The Truth about Carbohydrates

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Can Dogs Eat PotatoesCan dogs eat potatoes to add vitamins and nutrients to your dog’s diet or will you discover over time that the crunchy french fries and potato chips you unselfishly shared with your dog led to his weight gain and eventually spiked his blood sugar… which means you may be faced with additional expenses to pay for weight management or chronic health conditions like diabetes.

This dog health article gives you the health risks of potatoes in your dog’s diet.  I hope when you read this article you’ll avoid the bad potato choices that could lead to your dog’s health problems down the road.

Can Dogs Eat Potatoes? 3 Facts about Carbohydrates and Why to Avoid Them

  1. Nutrition – Your dog doesn’t need to eat carbs like potatoes to have a healthy diet according to the National Research Council and the Dog Food Advisor. 
  2. Quantity – Your dog’s manufactured dry food may already contain between 50-75 percent carbohydrates.  This means you need to carefully read the ingredients on the label to select the dog food with the lowest amount of carbs.  You don’t help your dog stay healthy If you add more carbohydrates in potato table scraps or treats.
  3. Obesity – Too much of a good thing like potatoes that are full of starch and carbohydrates can lead to extra weight that’s hard for your dog to burn off.

Can Dogs Eat Potatoes? Safe Ways to Give Your Dog Potatoes

Raw potatoes or any kind of potato plant in your kitchen and garden are off limits for your dog.

Can Dogs Eat PotatoesYou may already know that white potatoes belong to the nightshade family and contain solanine which is toxic to dogs.  When you cook a potato you reduce the levels of solanine.

Here are 2 safe ways to give your dog potatoes:

  • Baked – Scoop out the baked potato and discard the skin.  Wait until the potato is room temperature and mix it with your dog’s dry or wet food. Can dogs eat potatoes? You can also give your dog baked sweet potatoes as long as you take off the skin.  Sweet potatoes are a more nutritious option for your dog because they contain vitamins A, B6 and C, calcium, iron, magnesium and potassium.
  • Boiled – Cook potatoes until they are soft and remove the skin.  Mash up the boiled potatoes and let cool.  You can give your dog plain mashed potatoes of any kind.  White potatoes contain vitamin B6 and C, iron and magnesium.
  • Safe ingredients – You can add healthy non-toxic herbs and oils like parsley and coconut oil to your dog’s baked or boiled potatoes to give them added flavor.  Other safe ingredients include organic apple cider vinegar, bone broth, ginger, hemp seed oil, lemon, thyme and turmeric.
  • Portion Size:  You can give your dog under 20 pounds 1/4 cup baked or boiled potatoes once a week.  Give dogs over 20 pounds 1/2 cup baked or boiled potatoes once a week.  Always check with your veterinarian before you decide to add potatoes to your dog’s diet.

    Dangerous Ingredients to Avoid in Potato Dishes for Your Dog

    Can Dogs Eat PotatoesYour homemade potato casseroles, mashed potatoes and scalloped potatoes may seem like a healthy treat for your dog even though you now know the answer to ‘can dogs eat potatoes?’

    Avoid these ingredients if you choose to give your dog any cooked potatoes:

  • Garlic and onion – Your dog can get sick from too much powdered, raw, cooked or dehydrated garlic and onion you may add to mashed potatoes.  Symptoms range from weakness and vomiting to breathing problems and anemia.
  • Milk, cheese and sour cream – These milk-based products could give your dog diarrhea or trigger food allergies.
  • Oil, butter and salt – French fries, potato chips and fried potatoes are not healthy foods for your dog for any reason. The oil, butter and salt is not good for your dog’s digestion and can cause dehydration and other health problems related to your dog’s gastrointestinal system.

    Note:  If your dog has diabetes, avoid potatoes in his diet because the glucose can cause blood sugar spikes.

    This health article gives you the truth about carbohydrates and the answer to ‘can dogs eat potatoes’ which will help you take better care of your dog.  Now that you’ve read about potatoes for dogs I hope you’ll eliminate the bad choices and think twice when you offer french fries and potato chips to your dog.

    Share this article with your friends and family so they know what kind of potatoes they can give their dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

    SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like breaking news on how to NOT overpay for your dog’s healthcare costs and reduce the number of times your dog gets sick, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

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Best Companion Dogs for Seniors

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Best Companion DogsThe best companion dogs you can choose as a senior should result in a good match that keeps you safe and provides your new dog with the best home possible which means you may need to eliminate breeds like Newfoundlands or Great Danes simply because they could knock you over… and even worse you could trip over a hyperactive dog like a Jack Russell Terrier when all you really want is a companion dog to keep you company and not be the cause of a terrible accident or injury.

This dog health article gives you 10 loyal breeds to choose from as a companion dog for a senior. I hope after you’ve read this article you’ll be able to select the right dog. 

10 Best Companion Dogs for Seniors

You may already know that an adult dog from a shelter is a good place to start when you look for a companion dog.

An adult dog is usually house trained, requires less exercise and may be better suited to live with you than a puppy who is more active and needs lots of attention.

You can choose from these 10 breeds of adult dogs for the best companion dog.

  1. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel – A small loyal companion,Best Companion Dog the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel will be a good match.  This gentle breed is affectionate, doesn’t require a lot of exercise and loves being a couch potato.
  2. Shih Tzu – This Chinese toy breed is a perfect lapdog, will worship you as her owner and is one of the best companion dogs for seniors. Shih Tzus tend to be friendly towards strangers, children and other animals. You’ll also be able to easily care for this short-haired breed.
  3. Pekingese – Another toy breed from China, the Pekingese, could be a perfect choice as your companion dog.  Pekingese dogs can be trained to use puppy pads instead of going outside to piddle and poop.  This means you won’t need to walk this breed every day for elimination of urine and bowel movements.
  4. Yorkshire Terrier – The Yorkshire Terrier, small enough to carry in your purse, was specifically bred as a lapdog andBest Companion Dogs continues to be one of the best companion dogs. This breed will enjoy being at home with you and loves to lay around for hours.   
  5. Lhasa Apso – Kept by Tibetan Buddhist monks in monasteries, the Lhasa Apso makes a great watchdog and will alert you when strangers are on your property. Lhasa Apsos are another great breed for you because they love to lounge around and take naps.
  6. Toy Poodle – This popular tiny breed might be a good option because Toy Poodles don’t shed.  You do need to handle toy poodles with care, however, since they are fragile and their bones can break easily.
  7. Maltese – Another small breed who sheds very little is the Maltese who can either be long-haired or clipped short. Like the Bichon Frise and Havanese, the Maltese breed was developed to be on the list of the best companion dogs
  8. Pug. – Playful and attentive, Pugs can be a fun dog.  Pugs crave attention which makes them a great lapdog and companion for all ages.
  9. Chihuahua – This tiny dog tends to thrive on a single owner household and will be extremely loyal and protective.  Chihuahuas love to snuggle so they will stay by your side as a great companion.
  10. Pomeranian – Give a Pomeranian dog a few toys and some Best Companion Dogstreats and he’ll be your friend forever.  The Pomeranian is another fun dog who loves attention and will make a great companion.

5 Useful Tips for Seniors with Dogs

As a senior, you may not be able to take your dog out for walks in bad weather or if you have health issues like arthritis, early signs of dementia or feel like you have a cold.  Even the best companion dogs need to be cared for when you can’t do it yourself.

  1. Puppy Pads – You can train your adult dog to use puppy pads for elimination indoors which will save you from daily walks in bad weather or when you don’t feel well.
  2. Dog Walkers – Arrange for 2 or 3 dog walkers to pitch in when you can’t take your dog out for walks.  This way, your dog will get exercise and fresh air.
  3. Diet – Make sure you have plenty of healthy food for your dog and you don’t overdo it with treats and table food that could result in your dog’s health problems, obesity or diabetes.
  4. Grooming – Make monthly appointments with your local groomer if you can’t brush your dog or clip her nails.
  5. Veterinarian – Set up annual wellness visits with your local veterinarian to keep your companion dog healthy.

Best Companion DogsNow you’ve read about 10 of the best breeds to choose as a companion dog. There are many other breeds that could be a great match as long as your safety takes priority.

Share this health article on the best companion dogs for seniors with your friends and family so they all have the information they need when they search for a dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

By the way… claim your FREE “How NOT to Overpay to Keep Your Dog Well” video news.  Just go HERE now to get your Dog Health and Wellness Video News.

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