Veterinarian Near Me: Bad Vets and How to Avoid Them

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Veterinarian Near MeHow to choose the best veterinarian near me and avoid the bad vets might be the first question you want answers to as a new dog owner because your greatest fears include whether or not your dog’s vet will overcharge you, what if your vet can’t treat your dog in an emergency and even worse, what if your vet misdiagnoses your dog’s health symptoms which results in harmful side effects from your dog’s medication prescribed by your vet.

This news brief gives you essential questions you need to ask any veterinarian before you decide to put your dog in their care.  I hope when you read this post you’ll have all the ammunition you need to avoid bad vets near you and keep your dog healthy.

How to Choose the Best Veterinarian Near Me

Here are a few tips to help you select your dog’s veterinarian.

  • Word of Mouth – Members of your community who’ve used local veterinarians near you for years could be your most valuable when you need to find a good vet for your dog and avoid the bad vets. Dog owners in your local area will be honest about their vet’s service quality and give you actual examples how their dog’s health emergencies were handled.
  • Friendly Atmosphere – Check out the vet and staff’s behavior.  Notice the manner in which your questions are answered.  Take note of their attitudes and how they made you feel.  If you don’t feel comfortable, you may walk out and say to yourself, this is not the best veterinarian near me and continue your search.  Bad vets may not have the best bedside manner which could make your dog nervous or anxious at vet visits.
  • Busy Office – There are pros and cons to a busy veterinary office.  A busy waiting area could mean that the vet has happy clients and an outstanding reputation… or sadly the office staff are overbooking and you’ll be forced to wait longer for your appointments.  Ask the dog owners in the waiting room how long they usually for their appointment.  Bad vets near you may have a lot of clients but they are not always happy with the service in their practice.
  • References – Most vets will always give you names of people who’ve had a good experience with them. Word of mouth references are the best because you’ll get the truth about the good and bad vet’s service.

8 Questions to Ask Before Your First Vet Visit with Your Dog

  1. How many veterinarians work at your practice?   You might discover the best veterinarian near me is 5-10 miles further away from your home because you want a bigger practice with qualified staff on board in case your primary vet is too busy or on vacation.  Sometimes the best vet for your dog is not the nearest one to you. 
  2. What are your office hours and emergency policies?  You want to make sure your vet is open on Saturdays and has an emergency line in case you need help after hours or on holidays.  Ask about local emergency clinics they can refer you to and whether your primary vet will be able to care for your dog at that clinic.
  3. What services does your practice offer?  Overnight boarding services may be on your wish list for the perfect veterinarian near me.  That’s why you need to ask about all the services your vet offers.   Check to see if the vet’s practice has an on-site pharmacy.  Find out if the vet’s prices for their products are competitive. There may some bad vets who will overcharge for products which means you need to compare prices before you buy any medications or supplements for your dog. 
  4. Can my primary veterinarian perform surgery?  Your vet may need to refer you to another specialist outside of her practice to perform your dog’s surgery.  Ask for a list of the vets, surgeons and specialists that may treat your dog instead of your primary veterinarian.
  5. What type of equipment do you have on-site? Ask if the practice has x-ray equipment and the ability to do your dog’s blood work on-site.  Your dog’s tests will be done faster and may be less expensive if they are done on-site.
  6. How much is an office visit? You need to know how much it will cost for every visit to your vet.  Ask if there’s an extra charge for emergencies, Sundays and Holidays.  When you compare prices for office visits, make sure you look at all the services for each vet and pick the vet that’s best for you and your dog. You may discover your choice isn’t the same veterinarian near me as your neighbor because you are both looking for different things in a vet service.
  7. Do you have payment plans? – When things happen to your dog and expenses are higher than expected it’s good to know if your vet has payment plans to help you afford care for your dog.  Find out if the vet will accept your dog health insurance plan to pay for certain services.
  8. What’s your policy on vaccinations cancer care and euthanasia? Ask about the vet’s policy on annual vaccinations including kennel cough.  It’s helpful to know what to expect if your dog has cancer or when you need to make end of life decisions for your dog.

Now you know that the best veterinarian near me may not be the closest or the least expensive.   The answers to the questions above will help you to choose a veterinarian near you that suits your needs, avoid the bad vets, and save you thousands of dollars in dog health expenses.

Share this article with your friends and relatives to make sure they have the questions they need answers to when they look for a veterinarian near them.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like breaking news on how to NOT overpay for your dog’s healthcare costs and reduce the number of times your dog gets sick, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Chow Chow Dog: Ancient History and Charming Traits

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Chow Chow Dog A Chow Chow dog could be the perfect breed choice for you because your Chow Chow puppy looks like a little lion cub with thick fur around his neck and has the softest coat you’ve ever touched which makes you happy after you hand over your check for $2,500-$4,000…  however you also need to know the long list of possible surgeries for your Chow’s hip dysplasia, cataracts or bloat as well as annual expenses for grooming, treatments for itchy skin and eye conditions.

This news brief will help you understand the health challenges for Chow Chow dogs so you’ll be prepared for the upkeep, maintenance and potential problems you may have with your Chow.

Chow Chow Dog: Breed History and Unique Traits

  • The Chow Chow, called “Dog of the Tang Empire” originates from Northern China and is one of the ancient dog breeds still alive today.
  • Bred as a working dog for guarding, herding, hunting and pulling, Chow Chows were referred to as large war dogs that looked like black-tongued lions.
  • Teddy bears were modeled after Queen Victoria’s Chow Chow puppy because her friends didn’t think she should be seen with a dog.  Instead, they made a stuffed animal version for her to carry.
  • A sturdy breed, your Chow Chow has a square profile, small Chow Chow Dogpointed ears, a dense double coat, and thick fur especially around his neck.  His coat can be red, black/blue, cinnamon/fawn or cream.
  • Your Chow Chow dog has a blue, black or purple tongue which extends to his lips and throat.  The origin of this gene is a mystery and dominant even in mixed breeds.  Chow puppies have pink tongues with a small dot of blue or black that darkens by 8-10 weeks.
  • Other animals with a blue black tongue include the Chinese Shar-Pei, Giraffe, Polar Bear and some cattle like the Jersey.  Deposits of extra pigment like blue or black spots appear on 30 dog breeds which are similar to birthmarks and freckles on people.
  • Other unique traits of your Chow are his deep set eyes, curly tail and post-like straight back legs which give your dog a stiff gait.
  • The American Kennel Club (AKC) registers 10,000 Chow Chows a year and the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) registers 350 a year.

Chow Chow Dog: 6 Possible Health Challenges

  1. Autoimmune Disease – Your Rough Coated Chow Chow is at high risk for skin disease that starts around age 4.  Symptoms include crusty skin and hair loss around your dog’s nose and inside his ear flap.
  2. Bloat – Deep-chested dogs like your Chow Chow may be prone to gastric torsion known as bloat which often requires surgery to save your dog’s life.
  3. Entropion – Your Chow may develop an eye condition where his eyelids turn inward because of the folds in his skin around your dog’s deep set eyes.
  4. Glaucoma – Your Chow Chow may be genetically predisposed to glaucoma, a condition where pressure on your dog’s eye causes poor fluid drainage in his eye.  Glaucoma can be treated by surgery, however it can still decrease your dog’s eyesight.
  5. Hip and Elbow Dysplasia – Your Chow Chow dog may be prone to abnormal hip and elbow sockets that can result in painful arthritis and lameness.
  6. Juvenile Cataracts – Your Chow puppy could develop cataracts, a milky film behind his pupil.  Juvenile cataracts cause clouding in your dog’s eyes and can occur between 6 months to 2 years of age.

Chow Chow DogNote: Your Chow Chow breed is predisposed to many health challenges which could put your dog at risk for pain, surgery or life-long medical care.  Check out dog health insurance as one strategy to manage your dog health expenses.

Chow Chow’s Temperament, Lifespan, Habits and Diet

  • Your Chow Chow can be independent and fiercely protective of you and your property.  Although your Chow might be a great companion, he may not socialize well with strangers and could go from being too timid to too aggressive.  You may even notice a cat-like personality in your Chow.
  • Chow Chows live from 10-12 years, usually weigh from 45-70 pounds and reach a height of 17-20 inches.  Your Chow may have a tendency to drool and snore.  Chows don’t have a tendency to bark or dig and they are easily trained and housebroken as Chow Chow Dogpuppies.
  • Your Chow Chow dog may be laid back and not very active even so he needs at least 20 minutes of daily exercise to prevent boredom and restlessness.
  • The best diet for your Chow is beef, chicken, fish, turkey, veggies and fruit.  Occasionally you can add some yogurt and cooked eggs. 

Tips for Grooming Your Chow Chow

Your Chow Chow sheds like crazy in Spring and Fall which means you’ll find his fluffy fur all over your home especially during these seasons.  Here’s some tips to help you brush your Chow’s coat which can cut down on his shedding and keep him free of fleas:

  • Use a medium coarse brush for larger parts of your Chow’s body, a slick brush for smaller areas and a pin brush for longer strands of hair.
  • Brush your Chow Chow dog 4 times a week or daily in Spring and Fall when your dog is shedding the most.
  • Use a dog spray conditioner to avoid breaking the thick coat of of your Chow’s hair.
  • Give your Chow Chow a monthly bath to avoid fleas and keep him clean.

Now you’ve read about the ancient history and charming traits of the Chow Chow.  I hope it will help you discover if this breed is right for you and your family.  Your fluffy Chow Chow with his distinctive blue tongue could be your close companion for 10-12 years or more.

Share this article about the health challenges of the Chow Chow dog with your friends and family so they know about the possible costs and responsibilities of owning a Chow.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

Chow Chow Dog

Finnegan, the handsome Chow Chow featured in this article, belongs to Peggy Carney who lives in Massachusetts.  Peggy brings Finnegan to assisted living facilities to help bring joy to seniors and make them smile.  Finnegan’s friendly furry face and his laid back personality makes him a perfect visitor for seniors who love dogs.

By the way… claim your FREE “How NOT to Overpay to Keep Your Dog Well” video news.  Just go HERE now to get your Dog Health and Wellness Video News.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Dog Supplies You Need On-Hand for Any Weather Emergency

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Dog SuppliesDog supplies like canned or dry food and vital medications for your dog top the list of things you’ll need in weather emergencies like hurricanes or floods when you’re faced with life-threatening conditions, no electrical power and no plumbing… or even worse, you may lose your dog if you let her go outside in a storm to do her business and she runs away because she’s scared and disorientated.

This emergency dog supply checklist will help you plan for any approaching or sudden violent weather like tornadoes and tropical storms or blizzards so you’ll have enough food and necessities to take care of your dog and not have to worry.

Dog Supplies for Any Weather Emergency

You know there are times when you may need to hunker down in a storm or evacuate  your home with your dog.  Use this emergency supply checklist to choose the items you’ll need to care for your dog in any weather emergency.

  • Collars & Tags:  Make sure your dog wears her collar with tags that include your dog’s name, your telephone number and any critical medical information. 
  • First Aid Kit: Small bottles of hydrogen peroxide, apple cider vinegar and coconut oil are good to have in case your dog has cuts or infections. Pack a face cloth, towel, cotton balls and cotton swabs for scrapes or to keep your dogs eyes and body clean and dry.  You may want to add Benadryl to your dog supplies to keep her calm. Ask your vet for a complete list of first aid items to complete your kit.
  • Medications:  Pack a 4 week supply of medications for your dog with health conditions like diabetes and heart disease.  Keep your dog’s medications in a waterproof container.  Rotate her medications so they don’t expire and you’ll always have a fresh supply on hand.
  • Food and Water: Plan to have a 4 week supply of dog food and treats.  You may want to have a dozen feeding dishes and water bowls so you don’t have to wash them out and waste water.  YourDog supplies dog supplies should include a 4 week supply of water for your dog and additional water everyone in your family.  Rotate these supplies so they don’t go bad or expire.
  • Ice packs and cooler – You can store ice packs in your freezer in case your power goes off and you need to cool off your dog or keep your dog’s medication from getting too warm.
  • Trash & Poop Removal:  Stock up on poop disposal bags, paper towels, soap, disinfectant and garbage bags.  Trash bags are critical during a storm to keep your environment clean and avoid bacterial infections.
  • Emergency Indoor Potty – Use a small kiddie pool and put pieces of grass pod in it to create a place for your dog to relieve herself almost like the outdoors. Add newspapers and puppy pads to your dog supplies as a backup to use indoors for your dog’s waste.  Let your dog urinate or poop on some newspaper or a puppy pad before a storm so your dog can find his scent indoors. 
  • Dog travel bag or crate – You may want to have a crate or travel bag ready for your dog in any weather emergency.  SmallDog Supplies dogs may be safer in a dog travel bag if you need to leave your home in a storm, flood or hurricane.  You’ll also need a bag to carry food and supplies in an evacuation from your home.
  • Flashlight – You should have 3 large flashlights and plenty of batteries available if you lose power in a storm.
  • Blankets – Old blankets are perfect dog supplies to protect your dog on you hard basement or tile floor.  You will need blankets to keep your dog warm if your heat goes off in a blizzard.  You may also need blankets to carry your dog out of your home in a weather emergency, flood and high winds.
  • Photos of your dog – Put a dozen photos of your dog with her medical history in case she goes missing in a storm.
  • Toys – Keep a collection of old toys in a waterproof box you can carry.  Your dog will need plenty of toys to play with if you’re unable to go for walks outdoors or if you need to put your dog in a shelter through a storm.

Additional Dog Emergency Services and Protection

Here are 4 precautions to take in addition to the dog supplies listed above.

  1. Rescue Alert Sticker – Display a Rescue Alert Sticker on or near your front door. List the number of dogs in your household, the breeds and the name and number of your veterinarian.  If you leave your home, write “EVACUATED” over the rescue alert sticker.  You can get these stickers at your local pet supply store.
  2. Microchip: If you live in an area that’s prone to disasters you may want to have your dog microchipped In case your dog goes missing in a storm.  Your dog’s microchip can be read in most animal shelters.
  3. Safe Shelter for Your Dog – Lay out a plan for your dog in case of natural disasters like a blizzard or hurricane. Have a list of quality shelters and boarding kennels you can call in an Dog Suppliesemergency.  Find pet friendly hotels and motels in your area and out of state.  Be prepared with a list of friends and relatives who will take in your dog and your dog supplies if needed for her safety.
  4. Dog Caregivers  Arrange for temporary and permanent caregivers for your dog.  This will be a tough decision because of the responsibilities and emotions that surround emergencies that result in dog adoptions if something happens to you.  Whoever you choose must understand the level of care you expect for your dog.

Emergency Tips for Geographic Areas Prone to Disasters

You can get the free ASPCA mobile app that will tell you exactly what to do in a disaster like a flood, blizzard or hurricane.  This app allows you to access advice before, during and after a storm even if there’s no internet connection. You can also get a personalized missing pet recovery kit and be able to create a flyer to share on social media if your dog goes missing.

Dog SuppliesNow you have a list of dog supplies you may need in any catastrophic weather situation which will help you keep your dog safe.  I hope you’ll never need to use your emergency supplies for a real disaster, however your dog depends on your ability to be prepared and to protect her in any weather.

Share this article with your friends and relatives to make sure they have all the information they need about supplies for their dog in any emergency.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

Hope you took some great value out of this article about dog supplies for any emergency today! I’d love to hear your feedback, so leave a comment with your thoughts or questions.  Share your dog’s weather emergency situation below so others can benefit from your story.

Click on the social media links below to share this article.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like easy to follow news briefs to Get a Handle On Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs, claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

How to Crate Train Your Puppy and Keep Your Patience

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

How to Crate Train Your PuppyHow to crate train your puppy can become a bigger challenge than you thought because you’ll discover you need the patience of a saint with your 8 week old puppy who will whine and bark as soon as you close the door to her crate… and even worse, there’s no guarantee how long it will take to train your puppy which means you may need to clean up her mistakes in her crate and all over your house for months before you’ve finally potty trained your puppy.

This article describes 6 key things you need to help you crate train your puppy successfully. You may also discover you can potty train your puppy faster when she’s crate trained if you follow the method below.

How to Crate Train Your Puppy: 6 Key Things You Need for Success

  1. Crate – Your puppy’s crate should be big enough for her to lay down in, but not big enough to use as her bathroom.  Your puppy should to be able to stand up in her crate and have room to stretch.  Keep your puppy’s crate out of the sun, heat or drafts.  Put your puppy’s crate in a busy room and add another crate in your bedroom if needed so your puppy isn’t lonely at night.
  2. Water dispenser – Attach a water dispenser to your puppy’s crate so she’ll have a supply of fresh water whenever she’s in her crate. 
  3. Blanket – Layer your puppy’s crate with a soft blanket that will give her a comfortable place to relax, play and sleep. How to crate train your puppy can be easier when you create a safe place where she can rest.
  4. Toys – A stuffed Kong toy with peanut butter will keep your puppy busy and happy for hours.  Add a chew toy and a plush animal for variety.
  5. Treats – You’ll need a small bag of bite-sized treats while you crate train your puppy.
  6. Clicker – A clicker training tool will help you crate train your puppy using praise and positive reinforcement.

5 Step “Click and Treat” Method to Crate Train Your Puppy

Your puppy’s crate keeps her safe and secure, reduces your puppy’s fear and isolation and speeds up her house training.  Once your puppy learns that her crate is a safe place for her to relax, she will be happy to spend time in her crate and won’t use it as a place to urinate or poop.

How to Crate Train Your Puppy:

Step 1.  Get your puppy to lie down in her crate or play with a toy with the door open, then click and give her a treat.

Step 2. Repeat “Step 1” and use a verbal cue like “Crate Up” or “Kennel Up”.

Step 3. Stay in the same room with  your puppy when you crate train her so she feels comfortable.  You can do things like read, work on your computer or fold laundry.  Your puppy may play with her toys or fall asleep in her crate with the door open. 

Step 4. This is the hardest step in the process of how to crate train your puppy. When your puppy is comfortable in her crate, repeat “Step 1” and slowly close the crate door.

Step 5. Only open your puppy’s crate door when she quiets down.  This is positive reinforcement training.  When you respond to negative behavior like whines and barks, you enable your dog to continue with bad behavior to get what she wants.

Note:  Limit the time you leave your 9 to 11 week old puppy in her crate to 1 hour.   You can extend your puppy’s crate time to 3 hours from 11-14 weeks old.  5 hours is the maximum time to leave your puppy in her crate without a break to urinate or have a bowel movement.

How to Crate Train Your Puppy: Essential Tips for Success

  • Bladder – The smaller your dog, the smaller her bladder and the faster her metabolic rate.  This means that small dogs need to How to Crate Train Your Puppypee more often.  Your puppy will need to relieve herself every 4 hours for 8 months.  Avoid giving your puppy any water before bedtime so her bladder will be empty during the night.
  • Schedule for food and potty training – Start your puppy on a regular feeding schedule with no food in between meals.  Take your puppy out for a walk after each meal.  Go to the same spot each time so your dog finds her scent.  Stay with your puppy, give her praise and add a walk or a game.  Avoid giving your puppy food before bedtime so she won’t need to have a bowel movement at night.  Don’t play with your puppy on potty breaks at night because she’ll think it’s a game and develop a habit of night-time potty breaks.
  • PatienceHow to crate train your puppy successfully requires patience. You may need to help your puppy break old habits which means you will have to be patient and calm.  Don’t react to your puppy with anger because your puppy doesn’t understand this type of human behavior and will not change her habits to please you.
  • Positive Attitude – Don’t worry about mistakes when your puppy pees or poops in your house, just keep going.  Mistakes How to Crate Train Your Puppymay be the result of incomplete training or a change to your dog’s environment. Clap your hands if you see your dog is going to go to the bathroom inside your home.  Then take your puppy outside immediately and give her a treat to reinforce her positive behavior.

Now you have a list of the 6 key things you need to know how to crate train your puppy along with a 6 step “click and treat” method that will help you potty train your puppy faster.

Share this article with your friends and family so they have information to help them crate train their puppy.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

Add your story about your dog’s crate training or potty training experience in the comments section below so others can benefit from your story.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like breaking news on how to NOT overpay for your dog’s healthcare costs and reduce the number of times your dog gets sick, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Liver Disease in Dogs: Diagnosis, Causes and Prevention

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Liver Disease in DogsLiver disease in dogs could be very tricky to detect because your dog’s symptoms may be similar to other health problems that start off with increased thirst and excessive urination which keeps you up all night or you discover blood in your dog’s feces which scares you to death… and even worse, one day you notice the whites of your dog’s eyes look yellow and your vet informs you that your dog needs an ultrasound to check on his liver damage.

This news brief gives you information about prevention, symptoms and causes of your dog’s liver disease.  I hope when you read this post you’ll find the help you need to restore your dog’s liver and manage his disease.

Liver Disease in Dogs:  Detection, Causes and Prevention

Your dog’s liver removes toxins from his body.  As a vital organ, your dog’s liver helps break down drugs, metabolizes sources of energy, stores vitamins and glycogen, produces bile acids for digestion and manufactures proteins for blood clotting. 

If your dog’s liver isn’t healthy, your dog is at risk for liver disease.

Symptoms of Liver Disease

  • Increased thirst and urination
  • Blood in urine or feces
  • Loss of appetite and weight loss
  • Seizures, ataxia and loss of balance
  • Weakness and confusion
  • Vomiting and diarrhea
  • Jaundice – yellowish color of eyes, tongue, ears or gums
  • Ascites – fluid in belly

Danger:  If liver disease in dogs is not diagnosed early, your dog can develop hepatic encephalopathy,  a brain condition that includes seizures, disorientation, depression, head pressing, blindness, or personality changes.

Causes of Liver Disease

  • Fatty foods and Diabetes
  • Infections, Pancreatitis, trauma or disease that hurts your dog’s liver
  • Medications and painkillers
  • Plants, herbs such as ragwort, mushrooms, blue-green algae
  • Molds that grow on corn
  • Untreated heart worm
  • Aging
  • Genetic – Certain breeds may be predisposed to specific liver conditions. Copper storage disease is a known problem in Bedlington Terriers, Doberman Pinschers, Skye Terriers, and West Highland White Terriers. In these breeds a metabolic defect causes copper to remain in your dog’s liver which leads to chronic hepatitis.

5 Ways to Detect and Prevent Liver Disease in Dogs

  1. Avoid toxins – Keep toxic foods like alcohol, grapes and onions away from your dog.  Toxic substances in your home should be secured and out of your dog’s reach.
  2. Avoid fatty foods – Read labels on your dog’s packaged food to check on the amount of fat in his food. Ask your vet for help to make sure your dog gets a healthy low fat diet that will keep your dog’s liver healthy and prevent obesity or diabetes.
  3. Blood tests – Get annual blood tests that show toxin levels in your dog’s liver.
  4. Ultrasound – Your vet may recommend an ultrasound to check for tumors or cancer in your dog’s liver.
  5. Biopsy – Your vet may recommend a tissue biopsy to test for bacterial infections like Leptospirosis that can lead to liver disease in dogs.

5 Treatments for Your Dog’s Liver Disease

You can choose 1 of these 5 herbal remedies to help your dog with liver disease:

  1. Dandelion Leaf Root Tea – Dandelions help your dog’s digestion, pancreatitis, immune system, kidneys, liver and gallbladder.  Your dog can eat dandelions right out of your backyard as long as you don’t use pesticides or herbicides on Liver Disease in Dogsyour grass. Dry some dandelions and sprinkle a teaspoon into his food.  Make dandelion tea to help with elimination of toxins.  Add 1/4 cup of cool dandelion tea to your dog’s water bowl or mix with his food.  Increase the amount to 1/2 cup for dogs over 20 pounds.
  2. Lemon – The benefits of lemon include liver health and detoxification. Lemon juice even helps keep your dog free of parasites which helps prevent liver disease in dogs.  Use 1/4 teaspoon or less daily for small dogs under 10 pounds.  Use 1 – 2 teaspoons daily for medium to large dogs.  Add 1/2 teaspoon grated, chopped or finely minced lemon to your dog’s food at morning or night.  Keep lemon parts refrigerated in an air tight glass receptacle to keep fresh.
  3. Milk thistle – Sprinkle milk thistle seed powder on your dog’s food to boost immunity, repair and regenerate liver cells and rid your dog of toxins. Recommended daily dosage of milk thistle seed is 2 mg per pound and maximum 100 mg for large dogs
  4. Turmeric – Turmeric, a powerful anti-inflammatory herb, helps as a remedy for cancers, liver disease in dogs and reduction of blood clots. Sprinkle turmeric powder in your dog’s food daily to help with bacterial infections cuts and diarrhea.  Daily dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your dog’s weight and not exceed 2 teaspoons for dogs over 100 pounds.
  5. Wheatgrass – Wheatgrass is one of the best foods for your dog because it contains vitamins, calcium, iron, magnesium and selenium.  Benefits of wheatgrass include increased energy, Liver Disease in Dogsrejuvenates blood, delays aging, repairs DNA, and fights free radicals which helps prevent cancer and liver disease in dogs.  You can buy or grow organic wheatgrass and let your dog eat a few bites with each meal.  Snip off pieces of the wheatgrass and sprinkle on your dog’s food.

Note: Your dog’s liver is the only visceral organ known to regenerate.  This means that you may be able to control your dog’s liver disease with regular vet visits, rigid control of your dog’s diet and review of changes in your dog’s liver enzyme values.

Now you have 5 choices of powerful herbal remedies to help keep your dog’s liver healthy and give your dog a chance for a longer life if he has liver disease.

I hope you got some helpful tips from reading this post on liver disease in dogs.  I’d love to hear your feedback, so make sure you leave a comment below with your thoughts or questions.

Click on the social media links below to share this article.

Share this health article on diagnosis, causes and prevention of liver disease with your friends and family so they have the information they need to help their dog who may have liver disease.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like easy to follow news briefs to Get a Handle On Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs, claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone
FREE DOG WELLNESS VIDEOS: The Secrets To Keeping Your Dog Well And Reducing Your Vet Bills
Free Instant Access
Would You Like To Get a Handle On
Your Dog's Healthcare Costs
In less than 5 Minutes?
Never Worry About Large Vet Bills Again!
You too can Keep Your Dog Well...
For a limited time get
FREE INSTANT ACCESS
to the "Dog Wellness Reality Check"
video survey.

To receive my dog wellness video newscasts at no cost,
just enter your email below

Privacy Policy: I hate SPAM and promise to keep your email address safe.