Can Dogs Take Aspirin? Benefits, Risks & Alternatives

Can Dogs Take AspirinCan dogs take aspirin to help reduce pain or will you create another health problem for your dog like diarrhea and vomiting which could complicate his condition and increase your dog health expenses with vet visits… not to mention side effects like internal bleeding and an upset stomach which can make your dog sick enough to require emergency care.

This health article gives you information about the use of aspirin for your dog so you can keep him safe when he suffers from the pain of arthritis, illnesses or injuries.  I hope after you’ve read this article you’ll have the details you need to take better care of your dog’s pain.

Can Dogs Take Aspirin? 5 Reasons to Give Your Dog an Aspirin

  1. Aches & Pains – Your dog may have muscle aches or pain from too much exercise, a fall or recovery from surgery.
  2. Aging – When your dog gets older his muscles may tire more easily and need some relief for the pain of arthritis or other health challenges.
  3. Disease – Your dog may have a disease like cancer that causes aches and pains.
  4. Infection – Your dog may have pain from sores or infections while they heal.
  5. Injury – Your dog could have an accident like a fall or bump that causes pain.

Benefits of Aspirin for Your Dog

  • NSAIDs – The answer is yes to ‘can dogs take aspirin.’ Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory over-the-counter drugs like aspirin help reduce your dog’s swelling, stiffness, and joints similar to the way it works for people. Aspirin can relieve pain for your dog with arthritis or discomfort after your dog has surgery.
  • NSAIDs for dogs – Ask your veterinarian about these products to use instead of aspirin: Carprofen (Novox or Rimadyl), Deracoxib, Firocoxib (Previcox) or Meloxicam.
  • Dosage – Check with your veterinarian before you give your dog aspirin and only use it for short-term conditions that cause your dog pain.  Choose coated aspirin and give it to your dog with food so it doesn’t cause stomach problems.    

Note:  Can dogs take aspirin? Your vet can tell you if your dog can take aspirin, how many pills to give your dog and how many days are safe to use aspirin for your dog’s aches and pain.

Side Effects of Aspirin

Watch out for these side effects of aspirin and bring your dog to your veterinarian immediately.

  • Can Dogs Take AspirinDecreased appetite
  • Behavior changes
  • Bleeding
  • Diarrhea
  • Skin reactions
  • Stomach ache
  • Vomiting

5 Herbal Alternatives to NSAIDs

You can choose from these 5 herbal remedies to help relieve your dog’s pain as an alternative to aspirin.

  1. Aloe Vera Juice – Aloe vera juice restores and promotes Can Dogs Take Aspirinmuscle and joint function which helps reduce inflammation that can cause your dog’s pain.  Add a small amount of organic honey to cut the bitter flavor of natural aloe and add to your dog’s water bowl or mix with his food.  Aloe vera juice can cause diarrhea, so start with 1/2 teaspoon daily for dogs under 10 pounds and no more than 1 teaspoon daily for dogs over 10 pounds.
  2. Arnica – Arnica pellets or tablets help your dog with muscle aches, sprains, strains and emotional stress.  With arnica, you determine dosage by your dog’s symptoms instead of her weight.  For example, 3 pellets, or 1 dose, would be given 3 times daily for a chronic disease like arthritis.  Arnica pellets can be dropped in your dog’s mouth below his front teeth along your dog’s gum line or in your dog’s jowl pocket inside her cheek.  Don’t give arnica to your dog with food, treats or meals.  You can give arnica to your dog 15 minutes before or after meals.  Use arnica tablets if you have trouble dropping pellets into your dog’s mouth without touching them.
  3. Lavender – Lavender’s fragrant oil creates a calming or sleepy sensation to relax your dog and her central nervous system.  Rub lavender oil into your dog’s skin around her neck before a ride in your car and see if she’s more relaxed.  You can also use lavender in your home to relieve your dog’s pain, separation anxiety, stress, tension, headaches or migraines.  Lavender oil is an anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and anti-itch herb that helps heal bacterial infections and relieve your dog’s pain, stiffness, itchy skin, hot spots, skin irritations and cracked paws.
  4. Lemon – Fresh lemons alkalize your dog’s pH level and help relieve the pain of arthritis.  Add lemon peel to help keep your dog’s brain healthy and calm your dog if she has anxiety. Use 1/4 teaspoon or less daily for small dogs under 10 pounds.  Use 1 – 2 teaspoons daily for medium to large dogs.  Add 1/2 teaspoon grated, chopped or finely minced lemon to your dog’s food at morning or night.  Keep lemon parts refrigerated in an air tight glass receptacle to keep fresh.
  5. Licorice Root – Licorice root powder can reduce abdominal pain, inflammation, muscle spasms and bronchitis.  You can add a pinch of licorice root powder into your dog’s morning or evening meal as needed.

You’ve just read the answers to ‘can dogs take aspirin’ so you can take better care of your dog’s aches and pains safely.  I hope you will use this article to help you decide whether to give your dog aspirin or try herbal alternatives to help your dog with aches and pain.

Share this article with your friends and family so they’ll have ways to help relieve their dog’s discomfort from body aches or arthritis.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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10 Powerful Herbs to Keep Dog Digestive Systems Healthy

Dog Digestive SystemsYou may already know how dog digestive systems work but you could be the cause of your dog’s digestion problems when you give her table scraps like pizza and potato chips that contain spices, carbohydrates and salt which are not easy for your dog to digest… the results can be a real mess when you have to clean up your dog’s diarrhea or vomit and then you may need to pay for vet visits to heal your dog’s tummy ache and chronic digestion conditions.

This health article explains how your dog’s digestive system works and gives you 10 powerful herbs to choose from to keep her healthy.  I hope after you read this article you’ll have the information you need to help prevent your dog from chronic digestive health issues.

How Dog Digestive Systems Work

Your dog’s tongue pushes food into her esophagus that connects her mouth to her stomach. That means your dog’s esophagus works hard to push her food along because your dog doesn’t chew her food before she swallows.

Here’s what happens to your dog’s food after she eats:

  • Stomach: Your dog’s stomach stores food delivered through her esophagus. Gastric folds in your dog’s stomach help grind and digest her food along with acids and enzymes that break down her food. It takes about 12 hours for your dog’s food to leave her stomach and enter her small intestine in dog digestive systems.
  • Small Intestine: Your dog’s small intestine has 3 parts that connect her stomach to her large intestine. These parts are the duodenum, jejunum and ileum.  The function of your dog’s Dog Digestive Systemsduodenum is to connect with her gallbladder bile and pancreatic ducts to mix with digestive enzymes and help your dog digest her food. The function of the jejunum is absorption of nutrients and is the longest part of your dog’s small intestine.  The ileum passes the remaining contents into your dog’s large intestine.
  • Large Intestine: Your dog’s large intestine connects her small intestine to her anus and is larger in diameter.  This means that her large intestine’s function is to absorb water from her feces through her dog digestive systems until she has a bowel movement.  The parts of your dog’s large intestine include her cecum and colon.

10 Herbal Remedies to Keep Your Dog’s Digestive System Healthy

Your can choose from these 10 herbal remedies to keep your dog digestive tract health.

  1. Aloe vera juice – restore and promote regularity, digestion and pH balance.  Blend 1/8 teaspoon organic honey with 1 teaspoon Dog Digestive Systemsnatural aloe to cut the bitter flavor.  Stir this blend into your dog’s water bowl or mix with her food.  Aloe vera juice can cause diarrhea, so start with 1/2 teaspoon daily for dogs under 10 pounds and no more than 1 teaspoon daily for dogs over 10 pounds.
  2. Organic Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) – support your dog’s digestion.  Use 1/8 teaspoon ACV daily for dogs under 10 pounds, and 1/4 teaspoon daily for dogs over 10 pounds.  Add ACV to your dog’s meal in the morning or at night for healthy dog digestive systems.
  3. Bone broth and bone broth powder – help support your dog’s immune and digestive system.  Make this easy anti-inflammatory broth on your stove with organic grass-fed cow bones. Add a pinch of turmeric as an extra anti-inflammatory boost.  Pour enough water in your crock pot to cover bones with an extra 3 inches of water above the bones.  Add 3-4 tablespoons organic apple cider vinegar to pull out minerals from the bones.  Cook on high for 1 hour, then on low heat for 24 hours.  Remove bones and dispose.  Don’t allow your dog to chew on these cooked bones because they’re brittle.  Add 1/4 cup of cool bone broth to your dog’s food if she’s under 10 pounds.  You can add 1/2 cup cool bone broth to your dog’s food if she’s over 10 pounds.
  4. Dandelions – help your dog digestive systems including pancreatitis, immune system, kidneys, liver and gallbladder.  Dog Digestive SystemsYour dog can eat dandelions right out of your backyard as long as you don’t use pesticides or herbicides on your grass. Dry some dandelions and sprinkle a teaspoon into her food.  Add 1/4 cup of cool dandelion tea to your dog’s water bowl or mix with her food.  Increase the amount to 1/2 cup for dogs over 20 pounds.
  5. Jerusalem artichoke – a tuberous root you can use in powder form to help her digestion.  Add 1 teaspoon grated Jerusalem artichoke to your dog’s food daily.  Bake Jerusalem artichokes in your oven like potatoes.  Cool artichokes and mash into your dog’s food.
  6. Lemons – alkalize your dog’s pH level, promote liver health, boost immunity and dog digestive systems.  Use 1/4 teaspoon or less daily for small dogs under 10 pounds.  Use 1 – 2 teaspoons daily for medium to large dogs.  Add 1/2 teaspoon grated, chopped or finely minced lemon to your dog’s food at morning or night.  Keep lemon parts refrigerated in an air tight glass receptacle to keep fresh.
  7. Quassia bark – help your dog’s digestion, liver disease, gallbladder and upset stomach.  You can use 1-2 drops of quassia bark tincture in your dog’s food daily for all health conditions listed above.
  8. Rosemary – has anti-microbial and antioxidant qualities which help with dog digestive systems.  You can add a pinch of rosemary to your dog’s food daily.
  9. Thyme – helps settle your dog’s stomach, improve digestion and relieve bowel problems like diarrhea.  Pour 1/4 cup cool thyme leaf tea in your dog’s water bowl or add a pinch of thyme to her food once daily.
  10. Turmeric – powerful anti-inflammatory herb, helps as a remedy for liver disease.  Heat up a mixture of 1/2 cup turmeric powder, 2 cups water, 1/4 cup coconut oil and 1 teaspoon Dog Digestive Systemsground black pepper to make a thick paste.  You can refrigerate your turmeric paste in a sealed glass container and keep for 1 month.  Add turmeric paste to your dog’s food 3 times a week to help your dog digestive systems and reduce diarrhea.  Dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your dog’s weight and not exceed 1 teaspoon for dogs over 100 pounds.  Check with your vet before you give turmeric to your dog to make sure it will not interfere with your dog’s medications or health conditions.

You’ve just read about 10 herbal remedies to keep your dog’s digestive system healthy.  These herbs are also safe to use for you and your family to support digestion.

Share this article about dog digestive systems with your friends and family so they have ways to keep their dog healthy with powerful herbs.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Puppy Diarrhea: Key Causes, Remedies and Prevention

Puppy DiarrheaPuppy diarrhea could be messy to clean up and even make you sick to think something may be horribly wrong with your pup however her tummy can easily get upset which may result in diarrhea and dehydration… that means you need to know about the causes of your puppy’s diarrhea and take action before she needs emergency care to get rid of a parasite or treat a viral infection.

This health article gives you the causes of your puppy’s diarrhea including.  I hope after you read this information you’ll be able to take better care of your puppy and prevent her diarrhea.

7 Key Causes of Puppy Diarrhea

  1. Bacterial infection    Bacteria like Clostridium,  E. coli and Salmonella can cause your puppy to have diarrhea.
  2. Diet change – Diarrhea can result when you add new foods too quickly to your dog’s diet. You may also discover your dog has food allergies like lactose intolerance which can cause diarrhea.
  3. Parasites  – Coccidia, giardia, hookworms, roundworms and whipworms can cause severe diarrhea which will require you to bring your puppy to your veterinarian for treatment.
  4. Side effects – Use of  Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can give your puppy a case of diarrhea as a side effect. Herbal remedies like Aloe Vera, Boswellia, Ginkgo Biloba and Grape Seed Extract could also result in puppy diarrhea.
  5. Stress – Your puppy might be anxious around people and be scared of her environment because of street traffic and noise.  Stress can create an upset stomach that unfortunately creates loose stools or diarrhea.
  6. Toxic substance – Poisons and toxins like antifreeze, spoiled garbage and poisonous plants can give your puppy diarrhea. Keep your trash and garbage out of your puppies reach at all times to be safe.
  7. Viral infection – Parvovirus and distemper can be fatal diseases for your unvaccinated or partially vaccinated puppy.  Coronavirus can cause viral diarrhea and requires you to seek immediate medical care for your puppy.

3 Safe Herbal Remedies for Puppy Diarrhea

Try one of these 3 herbal remedies for your puppy’s diarrhea:

  1. Plantain is a backyard weed that’s good for diarrhea, chronic bowel disease and can help as a lubricant to remove foreign objects your dog has eaten.  Put plantain leaves in your blender or juicer and give your puppy 1/4 teaspoon daily for every 10 pounds.
  2. Thyme helps settle your dog’s stomach, improve digestion and relieve bowel problems like diarrhea. Pour 1/4 cup cool thyme leaf tea in your puppy’s water bowl or add a pinch of thyme to her food once daily.
  3. Turmeric, a powerful anti-inflammatory herb, helps as a remedy for puppy diarrhea. Heat up a mixture of 1/4 cup turmeric powder, 1 cups water, 1/8 cup coconut oil and a pinch of ground black pepper to make a thick paste.  You can refrigerate your turmeric paste in a sealed glass container and keep for 1 month.  Add turmeric paste to your puppy’s food twice a week to quiet her diarrhea. Dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/8 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your puppy’s weight.

Note:  Keep your puppy hydrated because diarrhea can cause dehydration very quickly.

Quick Tips to Prevent Puppy Diarrhea

  • Switch your puppy to a new diet slowly. 
  • Keep your puppy’s environment clean especially if your she plays with other puppies.
  • Vaccinate your puppy at the appropriate ages and keep her away from unvaccinated puppies or dogs.
  • Crate your puppy when she is not supervised to prevent her from toxic substances.
  • Learn about parasite prevention from your veterinarian.
  • Pick up your puppy’s poop and keep her away from poop in the street.

Now that you’ve read this article on puppy diarrhea you will be able to take better care of your puppy and help prevent her from getting loose stools.

Share this article with your family and friends so they will know what to do to help their puppy with diarrhea.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Dog Blood: Disorders, Symptoms and Safe Treatments

Dog BloodDog blood disorders may alarm you when you see excessive bleeding after your dog cuts herself on a sharp object like the edge of your table or a bone and you might notice your dog bruises easily when she plays with other dogs…  even worse you may have to clean up a bloody mess after your dog has a nosebleed which ends up with an emergency visit to your veterinarian to find out what’s wrong with your dog’s blood.

This health article about your dog’s bleeding disorders explains causes, symptoms and treatments to help you keep your dog safe. 

3 Symptoms of Dog Blood Disorders

Accurate reports of your dog’s symptoms are critical for your veterinarian to be able to properly diagnose your dog’s blood disorder.  You will need to include the severity and dates of each episode. 

Your veterinarian will conduct a urinalysis to look at proteins in your dog’s urine and order a complete blood count to review her platelet count, anemia, clotting and check for abnormal red and white blood cells.

Here are 3 blood disorder symptoms:

  1. Bleeding – Your dog may have spontaneous and excessive bleeding from a simple cut or surgery.  This means you need to check your dog’s body and her mouth for signs of dog blood disorders in case of spontaneous bleeding that may not be caused by an injury.
  2. Nosebleeds – You may see blood dripping from your dog’s nose or blood in her water bowl due to irritated or swollen blood vessels.
  3. Bruising – Your dog’s blood vessels may be sensitive to pressure which results in bruising during surgery or active play with people and other dogs.

5 Causes of Your Dog’s Bleeding Disorders

  1. Congenital Clotting Protein Disorder – Hypofibrinogenemia, a genetically inherited protein deficiency, can prevent blot clotting in breeds like Saint Bernard and Vizsla.
  2. Deficiency of Factor VII – Bruising and excessive bleeding during surgery occurs due to the deficiency of a dog blood clotting protein called Factor VII found in these breeds:  Alaskan Malamute, Beagle, Boxer, English Bulldog and Miniature Schnauzer.
  3. Canine Thombopathia – This disorder is due to a congenital defect in the function of platelets where they don’t clot properly. The only breed affected by Canine Thombopathia is the Basset Hound.  Symptoms include nosebleed, bleeding gums, and tiny spot-like bruises on your dog’s skin.
  4. Von Willebrand’s Disease – The most common congenital bleeding disorder is Von Willebrand’s factor, a deficiency in the protein that regulates blood clot formation. These breeds are most prone to this dog blood disorder: Basset Hound, Doberman Pinscher, German Shepherd, Golden Retriever, Miniature Schnauzer, Pembroke Welsh Corgi, Standard Manchester Terrier, Standard Poodle, Scottish Terrier, and Shetland Sheepdog.
  5. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever – This disease is caused by the Rickettsia parasite transmitted by ticks which kills blood cells and causes your dog’s blood vessels to swell. Symptoms include nosebleeds, bruises, bloody urine or feces, and bleeding in your dog’s retina.

Safe Treatment of Your Dog’s Blood Disorders

  • Platelet transfusion – Your dog with a decreased platelet count may require a platelet transfusion.
  • Cell transfusion – Your dog with anemia may require a cell transfusion of whole blood or packed red blood cell type.
  • Home care and checkupsDog blood disorders require regular visits to your veterinarian to monitor your dog’s urine and blood counts. You should restrict your dog’s movement If she has a bleeding episode. Give your dog soft food if she has bleeding gums and don’t let your dog chew on bones or hard toys.

Note: If your dog has a congenital bleeding disorder, you may want to have your dog spayed or neutered in order to prevent passing her disorder along to her puppies.

4 Herbal Remedies to Keep Your Dog’s Blood Healthy

Choose from these 4 herbal remedies to help support your dog with dog blood disorders:

  1. Bone broth and bone broth powder – helps support your dog’s immune system and detoxify her blood.  Make this broth with organic grass-fed cow bones.  Pour enough water in your crock pot to cover bones with an extra 3 inches of water above the bones.  Add 3-4 tablespoons organic apple cider vinegar to pull out minerals from the bones.  Cook on high for 1 hour, then on low heat for 24 hours.  Remove bones and dispose.  Don’t allow your dog to chew on these cooked bones because they’re brittle.  Add 1/4 cup of cool bone broth to your dog’s food if she’s under 10 pounds or 1/2 cup if she’s over 10 pounds.
  2. Marjoram – high in beta carotenes, essential oils, lutein & xanthins, iron, and vitamins A, C & K which helps with dog blood conditions like blood circulation.  Sprinkle marjoram powder in your dog’s food or add cool marjoram tea to her water or food bowl.  Marjoram is also available in capsules.  Dosage for small dogs:  Pinch of powder,  1/2 capsule, up to 1/4 cup tea.  Dosage for medium to large dogs: 1-2 teaspoons daily, 1 capsule, 1/2 – 1 cup tea.
  3. Plantain – a backyard weed that’s good for blood clotting.  Put plantain leaves in your blender or juicer and give your dog 1 teaspoon daily for every 20 pounds.
  4. Turmeric – a powerful anti-inflammatory herb that can help dog blood disorders by reducing blood clots. Heat a mixture of 1/2 cup turmeric powder, 2 cups water, 1/4 cup coconut oil and 1 teaspoon ground black pepper to make a thick paste.  You can refrigerate turmeric paste in a sealed glass container and keep for 1 month.  Dosage for turmeric should not exceed 1/4 teaspoon for every 10 pounds of your dog’s weight and not exceed 1 teaspoon for dogs over 100 pounds.  Turmeric is known as a “warming” spice and should not be given to dogs with dog blood disorders who are naturally hot or pant excessively.  Check with your vet before you give turmeric to your dog to make sure it will not interfere with your dog’s medications or health conditions.

Now you know about blood disorders, causes and treatments that could affect your dog’s health.  I hope this article helps you with your dog’s blood challenges.  You can share your dog’s blood story in our comments section below.

Share this health article on blood disorders with your family and friends so they have all the information they need to take care of their dog who may have a dog blood disease.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Can Dogs Eat Potatoes? The Truth about Carbohydrates

Can Dogs Eat PotatoesCan dogs eat potatoes to add vitamins and nutrients to your dog’s diet or will you discover over time that the crunchy french fries and potato chips you unselfishly shared with your dog led to his weight gain and eventually spiked his blood sugar… which means you may be faced with additional expenses to pay for weight management or chronic health conditions like diabetes.

This dog health article gives you the health risks of potatoes in your dog’s diet.  I hope when you read this article you’ll avoid the bad potato choices that could lead to your dog’s health problems down the road.

Can Dogs Eat Potatoes? 3 Facts about Carbohydrates and Why to Avoid Them

  1. Nutrition – Your dog doesn’t need to eat carbs like potatoes to have a healthy diet according to the National Research Council and the Dog Food Advisor. 
  2. Quantity – Your dog’s manufactured dry food may already contain between 50-75 percent carbohydrates.  This means you need to carefully read the ingredients on the label to select the dog food with the lowest amount of carbs.  You don’t help your dog stay healthy If you add more carbohydrates in potato table scraps or treats.
  3. Obesity – Too much of a good thing like potatoes that are full of starch and carbohydrates can lead to extra weight that’s hard for your dog to burn off.

Can Dogs Eat Potatoes? Safe Ways to Give Your Dog Potatoes

Raw potatoes or any kind of potato plant in your kitchen and garden are off limits for your dog.

Can Dogs Eat PotatoesYou may already know that white potatoes belong to the nightshade family and contain solanine which is toxic to dogs.  When you cook a potato you reduce the levels of solanine.

Here are 2 safe ways to give your dog potatoes:

  • Baked – Scoop out the baked potato and discard the skin.  Wait until the potato is room temperature and mix it with your dog’s dry or wet food. Can dogs eat potatoes? You can also give your dog baked sweet potatoes as long as you take off the skin.  Sweet potatoes are a more nutritious option for your dog because they contain vitamins A, B6 and C, calcium, iron, magnesium and potassium.
  • Boiled – Cook potatoes until they are soft and remove the skin.  Mash up the boiled potatoes and let cool.  You can give your dog plain mashed potatoes of any kind.  White potatoes contain vitamin B6 and C, iron and magnesium.
  • Safe ingredients – You can add healthy non-toxic herbs and oils like parsley and coconut oil to your dog’s baked or boiled potatoes to give them added flavor.  Other safe ingredients include organic apple cider vinegar, bone broth, ginger, hemp seed oil, lemon, thyme and turmeric.
  • Portion Size:  You can give your dog under 20 pounds 1/4 cup baked or boiled potatoes once a week.  Give dogs over 20 pounds 1/2 cup baked or boiled potatoes once a week.  Always check with your veterinarian before you decide to add potatoes to your dog’s diet.

    Dangerous Ingredients to Avoid in Potato Dishes for Your Dog

    Can Dogs Eat PotatoesYour homemade potato casseroles, mashed potatoes and scalloped potatoes may seem like a healthy treat for your dog even though you now know the answer to ‘can dogs eat potatoes?’

    Avoid these ingredients if you choose to give your dog any cooked potatoes:

  • Garlic and onion – Your dog can get sick from too much powdered, raw, cooked or dehydrated garlic and onion you may add to mashed potatoes.  Symptoms range from weakness and vomiting to breathing problems and anemia.
  • Milk, cheese and sour cream – These milk-based products could give your dog diarrhea or trigger food allergies.
  • Oil, butter and salt – French fries, potato chips and fried potatoes are not healthy foods for your dog for any reason. The oil, butter and salt is not good for your dog’s digestion and can cause dehydration and other health problems related to your dog’s gastrointestinal system.

    Note:  If your dog has diabetes, avoid potatoes in his diet because the glucose can cause blood sugar spikes.

    This health article gives you the truth about carbohydrates and the answer to ‘can dogs eat potatoes’ which will help you take better care of your dog.  Now that you’ve read about potatoes for dogs I hope you’ll eliminate the bad choices and think twice when you offer french fries and potato chips to your dog.

    Share this article with your friends and family so they know what kind of potatoes they can give their dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

    SPECIAL BONUS — If you would like breaking news on how to NOT overpay for your dog’s healthcare costs and reduce the number of times your dog gets sick, then claim your FREE ACCESS to the “How to Control Your Dog’s Healthcare Costs” video news . Go HERE to get it FREE.

Best Companion Dogs for Seniors

Best Companion DogsThe best companion dogs you can choose as a senior should result in a good match that keeps you safe and provides your new dog with the best home possible which means you may need to eliminate breeds like Newfoundlands or Great Danes simply because they could knock you over… and even worse you could trip over a hyperactive dog like a Jack Russell Terrier when all you really want is a companion dog to keep you company and not be the cause of a terrible accident or injury.

This dog health article gives you 10 loyal breeds to choose from as a companion dog for a senior. I hope after you’ve read this article you’ll be able to select the right dog. 

10 Best Companion Dogs for Seniors

You may already know that an adult dog from a shelter is a good place to start when you look for a companion dog.

An adult dog is usually house trained, requires less exercise and may be better suited to live with you than a puppy who is more active and needs lots of attention.

You can choose from these 10 breeds of adult dogs for the best companion dog.

  1. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel – A small loyal companion,Best Companion Dog the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel will be a good match.  This gentle breed is affectionate, doesn’t require a lot of exercise and loves being a couch potato.
  2. Shih Tzu – This Chinese toy breed is a perfect lapdog, will worship you as her owner and is one of the best companion dogs for seniors. Shih Tzus tend to be friendly towards strangers, children and other animals. You’ll also be able to easily care for this short-haired breed.
  3. Pekingese – Another toy breed from China, the Pekingese, could be a perfect choice as your companion dog.  Pekingese dogs can be trained to use puppy pads instead of going outside to piddle and poop.  This means you won’t need to walk this breed every day for elimination of urine and bowel movements.
  4. Yorkshire Terrier – The Yorkshire Terrier, small enough to carry in your purse, was specifically bred as a lapdog andBest Companion Dogs continues to be one of the best companion dogs. This breed will enjoy being at home with you and loves to lay around for hours.   
  5. Lhasa Apso – Kept by Tibetan Buddhist monks in monasteries, the Lhasa Apso makes a great watchdog and will alert you when strangers are on your property. Lhasa Apsos are another great breed for you because they love to lounge around and take naps.
  6. Toy Poodle – This popular tiny breed might be a good option because Toy Poodles don’t shed.  You do need to handle toy poodles with care, however, since they are fragile and their bones can break easily.
  7. Maltese – Another small breed who sheds very little is the Maltese who can either be long-haired or clipped short. Like the Bichon Frise and Havanese, the Maltese breed was developed to be on the list of the best companion dogs
  8. Pug. – Playful and attentive, Pugs can be a fun dog.  Pugs crave attention which makes them a great lapdog and companion for all ages.
  9. Chihuahua – This tiny dog tends to thrive on a single owner household and will be extremely loyal and protective.  Chihuahuas love to snuggle so they will stay by your side as a great companion.
  10. Pomeranian – Give a Pomeranian dog a few toys and some Best Companion Dogstreats and he’ll be your friend forever.  The Pomeranian is another fun dog who loves attention and will make a great companion.

5 Useful Tips for Seniors with Dogs

As a senior, you may not be able to take your dog out for walks in bad weather or if you have health issues like arthritis, early signs of dementia or feel like you have a cold.  Even the best companion dogs need to be cared for when you can’t do it yourself.

  1. Puppy Pads – You can train your adult dog to use puppy pads for elimination indoors which will save you from daily walks in bad weather or when you don’t feel well.
  2. Dog Walkers – Arrange for 2 or 3 dog walkers to pitch in when you can’t take your dog out for walks.  This way, your dog will get exercise and fresh air.
  3. Diet – Make sure you have plenty of healthy food for your dog and you don’t overdo it with treats and table food that could result in your dog’s health problems, obesity or diabetes.
  4. Grooming – Make monthly appointments with your local groomer if you can’t brush your dog or clip her nails.
  5. Veterinarian – Set up annual wellness visits with your local veterinarian to keep your companion dog healthy.

Best Companion DogsNow you’ve read about 10 of the best breeds to choose as a companion dog. There are many other breeds that could be a great match as long as your safety takes priority.

Share this health article on the best companion dogs for seniors with your friends and family so they all have the information they need when they search for a dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Can Dogs Eat Mango? Pros, Cons & A Little Known Secret

Can Dogs Eat Mango Fruits for dogs may provide health benefits but can dogs eat mango as part of their daily diet is a question you want answered before you give this sweet fruit as a treat to your dog and discover he has diarrhea or develops gastrointestinal problems down the road… and even worse you may think a mango pit is too big for your dog to swallow just to be shocked after you let your dog lick a slippery mango seed that it disappears right down his throat.

This dog health article gives you the pros, cons and a little known secret about mangoes which will help you decide if you want to add them to your dog’s diet. 

Can Dogs Eat Mango? 5 Health Benefits for Your Dog

A sweet and refreshing tropical fruit, mangoes can boost your dog’s immune system and help fight off potential illnesses.  Here are 5 health benefits of mangoes for your dog:

  1. Fiber – Mangoes are high in fiber which helps your dog’s digestion system.
  2. Vitamins – Mangoes contain vitamin A, B6, C, E and K which adds nutrients to your dog’s diet.
  3. Potassium  The potassium in mangoes help your dog’s enzymes, muscles and nerves.
  4. Magnesium  The magnesium in mangoes help your dog Can Dogs Eat Mangoabsorb and use vitamins and minerals like Vitamin C and E, calcium and potassium. Your dog needs magnesium for things like proper bone growth and production of protein.
  5. Beta-carotene – The benefits of beta-carotene for your dog include decreased asthma symptoms, prevention of cancer and heart disease, and age related macular degeneration (AMD) which could lead to your dog’s vision loss.

Can Dogs Eat Mango? 5 Tips Before You Give Mango to Your Dog

You can give your dog small amounts of mango to add variety and nutrients to his diet with your veterinarian’s approval.  Here’s 5 tips to use when you serve mango to your dog:

  1. Wash – Any mango you buy may contain chemicals, insecticides or pesticides. That means you need to thoroughly wash off your mangoes to protect your dog from these toxic substances.
  2. Peel – Mango skin contains Urushiol, a compound found in poison oak or poison ivy, which can cause your dog to have an Can Dogs Eat Mangoallergic reaction like a skin rash. In addition, mango skin is hard for your dog to digest and could cause gastrointestinal blockages. Therefore, one answer to can dogs eat mango is to peel it and don’t give your dog the skin.
  3. Seed – Mango seeds or pits contain small amounts of cyanide and could cause your dog to choke or get stuck in his digestive tract. After you wash and peel your mango, be sure to remove and dispose of the seed.
  4. Portions – Cut up small pieces of ripe mango and give your dog 2 or 3 pieces as a test.  Some fruits and vegetable can cause your dog to have a bellyache or diarrhea because of the fiber content.
  5. Dried mango – This form of mango contains more sugar, calories and carbohydrates which are all bad for your dog’s health. Therefore, the answer to can dogs eat mango is yes as long as it’s ripe and raw, not dried.

A Little Known Secret About Mangoes

Mangoes have a low glycemic index which means that small amounts won’t spike your dog’s sugar levels.

Check with your veterinarian before you give mango to your dog with diabetes to help normalize his insulin. 

Now you know the 5 health benefits of mangoes for your dog.  I hope you use this information and the 5 tips in this article to treat your dog with a few healthy pieces of mango.

Share this article with your friends and family so they know the answer to can dogs eat mango to keep their dog healthy.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Can Dogs Eat Apples? Remove These 4 Parts to be Safe

Can Dogs Eat Apples Can dogs eat apples safely or do you put your dog at risk from the toxic substance in apple seeds and high sugar content in apples which could impact your dog’s health over time… even worse you may forget to cut away the sharp parts in the apple core and cause your dog to choke or gag.

This dog food health article gives you 4 parts of the apple to remove so you can safely let your dog enjoy a crunchy piece of apple as a treat.  I hope after you’ve read this article you’ll have all the tips you need to add apples to your dog’s diet.

Can Dogs Eat Apples?  Yes… As Long as You Remove These 4 Parts

You may already know about the sugar content in apples which means that it’s best to only give your dog pieces of apple once or twice a week. 

Here are the 4 parts of the apple to remove before you add apples to your dog’s diet:

  1. Skin   Peel the skin off an apple before you give it to your dog.  Since your dog doesn’t chew his food, apple skin could get stuck in his throat or cause problems in your dog’s Can Dogs Eat Applesdigestive process.
  2. Seeds – Remove apple seeds because they contain cyanide and could be hazardous to your dog’s health if he eats too many.
  3. Core – Remove the entire apple core because your dog could choke on the slippery or sharp parts as it goes down his throat.
  4. Stem – Remove the stem from the apple so your dog doesn’t choke on this hard piece that could get stuck in his throat.

Note:  Apples do contain sugar. Check with your veterinarian before you give apples to your dog with diabetes or cancer. 

Can Dogs Eat Apples?  4 Health Benefits of Apples for Your Dog

Apples may be one of the easiest low calorie treats to give your dog. Here are 4 health benefits:

  1. Vitamins  Apples provide a good source of vitamin A and C which can help prevent canine degenerative conditions like joint disease.
  2. Fiber – Apples contain high fiber which can contribute to your dog’s overall gastrointestinal health.
  3. Antioxidants – Apples contain antioxidants that fight cancer and other diseases.
  4. Low protein   Apples have low fat and low protein which can help your senior dog who may have protein restrictions or require a low fat diet.

Bonus:  Can dogs eat applesApples can help keep your dog’s teeth clean and freshen his breath.  Be sure to cut small pieces of apple to give your dog so they don’t get stuck in his throat.

Can Dogs Eat ApplesRecipes for Applesauce and Apple Ice Cubes for Your Dog

After you remove the 4 parts of the apple mentioned above… the stem, skin, core and seeds, you can put the pieces of apple in your blender and make applesauce and apple ice cube treats.

Choose 1 of these recipes to serve your dog:

  • Applesauce – Blend apple slices in your blender or food processor and add a pinch of cinnamon.  Mix 1 or 2 teaspoons of applesauce in your dog’s meal 3 or 4 times a week.  you can also give your dog a tablespoon of applesauce in a dish 3 times a week.
  • Apple Ice Cubes – Pour your applesauce into ice cube trays and put in your freezer.  Give your dog an apple ice cube 3 or 4 times a week as a healthy treat.

You’ve just read the answers to ‘Can dogs eat apples’ as well as 2 recipes to spice up your dog’s diet with healthy treats. I hope you’ll remember to not overdo it with apple treats and to remove all 4 parts of the apple before you give any pieces to your dog.

Share this article about the health benefits of apples for your dog with your family and friends so they have information to give them safely to their dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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Degenerative Myelopathy in Dogs: Proven Home Care Tips

Degenerative Myelopathy in DogsDegenerative Myelopathy in dogs appears to be similar to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) in humans and affects your dog’s brain and spinal cord nerves which results in your dog’s progressive disease… that means you’ll need to be prepared for expenses like physical therapy, anti-inflammatory drugs, or a wheelchair and even worse you’ll be faced with challenges that include the physical and emotional burden to care for your handicapped dog.

This dog health article gives you firsthand proven ways to successfully care for your dog with degenerative myelopathy (DM).  I hope Paul Konowicz’ tips which are based his and his wife Sharon’s personal experience with Justice, their beloved Boxer, will answer your questions about how to care for your dog with this incurable disease.

What is Degenerative Myelopathy in Dogs?

According to Paul Konowicz, not much is known about the mechanism of DM.  Paul says, like ALS, your dog’s muscles begin to lose nourishment and start to waste away or atrophy.  Whether that means it’s an autoimmune disease or a generic one nobody’s sure just yet. 

Something appears to attack the sheath around the nerves in your dog’s spine that prevents his nerves from working.  It may also be Degenerative Myelopathy in Dogsinflammation that occurs because of a malfunctioning protein. 

Surgery won’t help your dog with DM unless he has another condition like a tumor that could be removed at the same time. 

This is Paul’s wish: “Hopefully scrupulous breeders will not breed dogs with DM genes.”

Degenerative Myelopathy in Dogs: 9 Tips from Paul Konowicz to Help Care for Your Dog with DM

Paul says the best thing you can do is make sure your dog gets lots of exercise and physical therapy. 

You can also choose from these 9 tips that worked for Paul and Sharon to care for their dog Justice:

  1. Anti-inflammatory drugs and supplements –  Try N-acetylcysteine as an anti-inflammatory drug to help prevent oxidative damage to your dog’s spinal cord. First check with your vet before you use any medications for your dog.
  2. Assisi loop – This non-invasive, FDA cleared, evidence based therapy can be used for treatment of your dog’s pain and swelling with no side-effects. 
  3. Genetic test – Ask for a genetic test to detect degenerative myelopathy in dogs from your breeder to see if your dog is prone to DM.  The cost is about $200.
  4. Harness – Some of the most important things owners can do for their dog’s health and their own physical safety is to get a good harness for your dog.  It will help your dog tremendously and help you prevent back pain or injuries when you lift your dog. 
  5. Feet – Particular care about your dog’s feet is important to prevent sores.  Your dog with DM will start curling his toes and eventually won’t be able to put his paws down flat.  Your dog will also get cuts on the tops of his feet if you don’t protect them or use special shoes.  Another symptom of degenerative myelopathy in dogs affects your dog’s ability to walk on slippery surfaces like wooden or tile floors.  Early on, try “balloon” shoes to help your dog from slipping.  Later on, special dog shoes are necessary to prevent your dog  from dragging his feet and scraping them on pavement which will cause sores.  Dog shoes need to be ordered and fitted by your veterinarian or physical therapist.
  6. Incontinence – Learn how to express your dog when he has incontinence issues.  Fecal incontinence for Paul’s dog Justice didn’t seem to be an issue because his bowel movements just came out. 
  7. Mattress – Paul recommends you get a cot with a mattress to cushion your dog and keep him off the ground.  The cot will raise your dog 18 to 20 inches off your floor which is an enormous relief for your back especially if your dog is over 50 pounds. Paul bought a mattress with 2 inch memory foam for about $125.  Degenerative myelopathy in dogs can take a toll on your dog’s body so you want to keep him as comfortable as possible.
  8. Urine, diapers and puppy pads – It’s important to keep your dog dry and free of urine scalds. This means you need to change your dog’s diapers at least 3 to 4 times daily and use baby wipes and cornstarch powder afterwards. Paul and Sharon used regular Degenerative Myelopathy in Dogsdiapers and a special dog waist wrap to secure Justice’s diaper.  They placed Justice on puppy pads for him to poop.  It is easier and less messy to just let the poop fall out.  This is probably the most difficult task and it takes some getting used to.  “However, your dog is like your child and you will do almost anything.” 
  9. Dog Health Insurance – Finally, getting good dog health insurance is critical. You will have unexpected dog health expenses with your dog because of the progressive nature of degenerative myelopathy in dogs.  The best strategy will be to get dog health insurance for your puppy before he develops any pre-existing conditions.

Now you have 9 proven tips to use to help care for your dog with DM thanks to Paul Konowicz, his wife Sharon and Justice.  I hope you got value from this article so you can take better care of your dog with DM.

Share this article on degenerative myelopathy with your friends and family so they have these 9 helpful tips from Paul and Sharon to care for their dog.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies and personal experiences from Dog Health News.

Our featured dog is Justice, a handsome Boxer who developed DM and lived in New England with his owners.  Justice was able to use a custom designed wheelchair to help him walk and run around.  I was sad to hear that Justice lost his battle with DM.  Thankfully, Justice had loving owners who took care of him through every challenge.

By the way… claim your FREE “How NOT to Overpay to Keep Your Dog Well” video news.  Just go HERE now to get your Dog Health and Wellness Video News.

Prevent Dog Choking: Know the Dangers of Dog Collars

Dog ChokingThe fear of your dog choking can concern you when your dog pulls hard on his leash which forces his collar to dig deep into his neck and makes him cough… or even worse you worry about your dog at home alone because his collar and tags could get stuck on something and cause him to choke before you can help him get out of his collar.

This dog health article gives you tips on dog collar safety to help you keep your dog out of harm’s way.  I hope when you read this article you’ll use these tips to prevent your dog from choking because of his collar’s poor fit or his dog tags.

Prevent Dog Choking: Steps to Check the Correct Fit of Your Dog’s Collar

First, check out whether your dog’s collar is the right one for your dog’s age, size and breed.  Here’s how to get the right size collar for your dog.

  • Use a soft measuring tape to measure the top part of your dog’s neck and add 1 inch.  This part of your dog’s neck is the narrowest part. 
  • Slide your index and middle finger under your dog’s collar to check that it’s not too tight. Your dog’s collar should fit snugly so it won’t to slip over your dog’s ears.

3 Dog Choking Dangers from Dog Collars & Tags

Second, here are 3 dangers to avoid that will help prevent your dog from choking due to his collar.

  1. Tight Collar  Your dog’s tight collar could restrict his airway and make it difficult for your dog to breath.  Tight dog collars also cause chafing around your dog’s neck which can lead to skin irritations.
  2. Loose Collar – Your dog’s loose collar can easily slide off.  This means that your dog’s collar could get caught on gates, furniture, bushes and other dogs when they play.  The risk for your dog is choking or suffocation if he’s unsupervised or home alone.
  3. Tags on Collar – Dog tags can get caught on things like your dog’s crate, furniture or bushes.  Your dog may twist and turn to get loose which could have fatal results from choking.

6 Tips to Prevent Dog Choking Injuries & Accidents

Lastly, here are 6 valuable tips to help you keep your dog safe from injuries due to his collar.

  1. Microchipping – One strategy to protect your dog from collar injuries and choking is to get your dog microchipped.  Your dog also has a better chance to be found if he’s gone missing because his collar and tags could easily be removed by someone who might want to steal your dog.
  2. Break-Away Collars – These collars will unsnap when it gets stuck on something like your dog’s crate or a bush.  Dog choking accidents can happen in the blink of your eye which means you need to supervise your dog at all times.
  3. Collar Free  Consider removing your dog’s collar when he sleeps or is home alone, plays with other dogs, and when your dog is asleep at night.  This way, your dog won’t be in danger of choking from his collar or dog tags when you’re not able to be with him.
  4. Boarding and Doggie Day Care – Discuss your collar on and collar off rules with the owner of all dog boarding and day care centers so your dog is safe in their facility and with other dogs at play.
  5. Dog Sitters & Dog Walkers – Instruct your dog sitters and walkers on your collar rules and dog choking safety so they understand the do’s and don’ts to keep your dog safe inside and on walks.  This includes being careful not to pull your dog with his leash and cause harm to your dog’s neck and throat.
  6. Groomers – You may want to give you groomer specific instructions about your dog’s collar when they wash and dry your dog for safety.  Soapy fur becomes slippery and collars can slide off while your dog gets lathered up.  To prevent accidents, always require that your dog is supervised and never left alone while they are at your groomers.

You’ve just read about the dangers of dog collars and how to prevent dog choking which will help you keep your dog safe from accidents and injuries that could result from your dog’s collar and dog tags.  Freak accidents like dog’s choking by his own collar can happen in seconds so I hope this information gives you all the tips you need for your dog’s safety.

Share this article with your friends and family so they have ways to keep their dog safe from accidents, injuries or choking as a result of their dog’s collar.  You can always depend on the best dog health strategies from Dog Health News.

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